Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Television

Submission + - Spanish Soap Operas Top YouTube Piracy List (adage.com)

Dekortage writes: "It's no secret that people upload pirated video to YouTube. However, the number one pirated network might surprise you: it's Spanish-language Univision. For example, YouTube has nearly 30,000 pirated clips of the current hot novela Cuidado con el Angel. Fox and ABC are second and third on the list, although their numbers are half of Univision's. In contrast with networks like NBC, the analysts at noted that they had "never seen a copyright takedown on any of Univision's shows on YouTube.""

Comment Re:How to Falsify Evolution (Score 2, Insightful) 951

That's what we need, a generation of young people who know how to make a sensible-sounding fallacious argument.

Stepping back from the article for a moment... it's not just evil fundamentalists who have honed that skill. Think politicians, marketers, ad execs, the RIAA, and plenty of others. Much of society is based on saying things that sound truthy but aren't quite true.

Comment Re:Not that cold (Score 1) 290

People from Canada/USA/Scandinavia/Eastern Europe just laugh. They laughed at all the English people making a big deal out of "not much" snow, too.

I lived in the American South for several years. The small town I lived in had no snow for two winters in a row, so they sold the town's snow truck. The next winter, we got a whole inch of snow, and the town almost totally shut down for a couple of days because there was no truck to plow the snow aside.

Compare that to when I lived in Buffalo, NY, where we sometimes got five inches of snow per hour -- for six hours or more.

Comment So... make sure one of your apps is a VM? (Score 1) 842

If this news is true, then folks will find ways around it. Running a VM could be one. Or they will turn more to web apps -- hello, tabbed browsing!

Maybe this is actually an attempt to limit malware. If your computer is running multiple malicious background apps, suddenly you won't be able to run anything else, and users will become more careful about sites they visit, etc.??? Nah, that'll never work...

Comment Another music service bites the dust (Score 3, Insightful) 125

FTA:

music that has not passed its âoerenew dateâ still works... music that has expired will no longer work because the DRM licensing server has apparently shut down.

Quick, listen to your music before it expires!

Also, the article suggests that Total Music (which recently acquired Ruckus, and was a joint venture between Sony and UM) still has some life in it, but this article (on the same site!) says otherwise and quotes the blog of a VP there. I guess these record labels are having a hard time with this stuff...

Comment Re:Not that cold (Score 2, Insightful) 290

Of course our cold temps pale in comparison to Canada, and the northern New England states Maine, New Hampshire, etc.

Where I live in upstate New York, we've hit -15 F (-26 C) several days this year. Further upstate from me has gotten to -25 F (-32 C) below. Friends in Maine tell me they've seen -35 F (-37 C) this winter. These weren't just for a day, but for several, even more than a week at times, before returning to ever-so-slightly warmer temperatures.

Even if things were cold back in 1709, methinks they doth protest too much.

Comment Almost ten years??? (Score 2, Funny) 20

"It's been this way for Hinton for most of this decade." So now that he's earned almost a million bucks, plus retirement and benefits, he's coming forward. What a guy!

Wife: "So honey, how was work today?"

Hinton: "It was really tough. They kept playing lousy music on the radio, and the commercials were terrible! At least I finished learning French on tape."

Comment Re: don't want to pay for abortions (Score 1) 377

I work with several international nonprofits, and I know a lot of people who write grant proposals, as well as folks in USAID and various foundations who review proposals. The U.S. government does not simply dump money into the general fund of any organization. Instead, it defines a very narrow destination for that money: you will work on Issue X (e.g. HIV), in Region Y (e.g. Uttar Pradesh in India), for Time Period Z (e.g. September 2009 through August 2011), using Methodology A (e.g. abstinence education). Furthermore, you will report on your efforts with weekly summary reports and quarterly detailed analysis, and we will drop by whenever we feel like it to inspect. A lot of folks in the nonprofit world complain about all the strings and boundaries placed on the money and the work, but hey, it is the government's money, and they have every right to ask this. But none of this is going into anybody's "general fund."

Now, you're probably referring to the Global Gag Rule that was recently overturned. To quote an earlier post:

U.S. funds did not pay for abortions overseas before the GGR, and they won't now. Check the 1973 Helms Amendment and subsequent clarifications by the government. The Global Gag Rule took it a step further, and said that if a health clinic accepted U.S. funding for any reason (obviously not abortions because that was prohibited), then it couldn't use any of its OTHER funding sources for abortions -- even if that funding was from its own government, or its own fundraising, and even if abortion was legal in its country. In fact, if it accepted U.S. funds but did not offer abortions in any way, its funding would be cut if staff merely told women of other clinics where abortions were available.

Furthermore, shutting down clinics due to the GGR has been enormously stupid: the rates of safe abortions have dropped, but they are offset dramatically by the rise in unsafe witch-doctor-style abortions. And since these clinics are generally one-stop health centers that provide a huge variety of services, cutting off all their US aid means cutting back on things we can all support, like malaria medicine for kids or prenatal checkups for pregnant women or HIV counseling for infected couples.

Comment Re:change (Score 1) 377

It's an enormous deal to me that my tax dollars are being used to fund overseas abortions.

You must be talking about the Global Gag Rule (a.k.a. Mexico City Policy to its supporters) which Obama recently overturned. You shouldn't believe everything you hear in the news. U.S. funds did not pay for abortions overseas before the GGR, and they won't now. Check the 1973 Helms Amendment and subsequent clarifications by the government. The Global Gag Rule took it a step further, and said that if a health clinic accepted U.S. funding for any reason (obviously not abortions because that was prohibited), then it couldn't use any of its OTHER funding sources for abortions -- even if that funding was from its own government, or its own fundraising, and even if abortion was legal in its country. In fact, if it accepted U.S. funds but did not offer abortions in any way, its funding would be cut if staff merely told women of other clinics where abortions were available.

I think abortion is wrong, but the Global Gag Rule has been a terrible piece of legislation, and dramatically misrepresented by most media sources.

Comment Re:More details please (Score 1) 73

Like you say, it's free, try it out for yourself.

However, from experience I can tell you that hiring a good expert in the CMS of your choice, can really save you lots of headaches. Whether it's Typo3, or Drupal, or Plone, or Joomla, a good expert can set up the templates, organize the pages, and give you advice/support on managing the site. I am not an expert in any of these CMSs, but have worked on projects involving them enough times that I recognize the value of a good expert. It can be like hiring a magician, and far better than trying to learn a programming and coding your own CMS. (I have coded my own CMS's for custom situations, but an off-the-shelf system generally does what most people need.)

(My current CMS of choice is Cascade, which is a commercial product and based almost entirely on XML/XSL to output just about any data you want: XML, XHTML, PHP, JSP, ASP, PDF, whatever. Really powerful, although XSL is a cruel lover if you aren't careful.)

Having said all that, I'll share this advice about Joomla:

  • The built-in text editor is junk. Find and install JCE. The core JCE functionality is free, though the commercial add-ons for image management are worthwhile if you manage a lot of graphics in the site. Like a lot of things about Joomla, JCE adds features that should have been there in the first place.
  • You need the Extended Menu plug-in if you want to do any useful CSS menuing like Suckerfish. Even though it doesn't handle SSL links right (they get menued as HTTP instead of HTTPS), it's still totally worthwhile. You can fix some of the HTTPS stuff via an htaccess file if necessary. As above, this adds a feature that should be already part of Joomla.
  • I have never, ever, ever been able to get any of Joomla's community extensions working right. None of them. It's a good thing that I don't run any community sites and have only experimented with them for family or clubs I'm in.

I've written Typo3 extensions before (in PHP obviously), but must admit that I detest TypoScript. It always feels like a hack.

Slashdot Top Deals

Trap full -- please empty.

Working...