Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:China and South Korea already did this, no? (Score 1) 363

the fact that American consumers (who have the freedom to do so) have been buying these specialized connectors and cables for years proves that consumers want them. That's common sense as well as basic economic theory -- which some Slashdotters seem to understand better than others.

I honestly can't tell if you are being sarcastic or serious.

Suppose that, when you bought a cell phone, you were given a choice between (1) using a power adaptor plug that you already owned and fit other devices you owned, and (2) buying a new power adapter that only worked with this one single new device. Everybody would choose #1. The only reason that Americans have always chosen #2 with cell phones, is because there has never been a choice #1.

Comment Re:Short answer (Score 2, Informative) 564

(1) Is to help boost stocks by convincing investors the company is growing, even though it's not actually hiring anybody. (2) To claim they searched for U.S. candidates, could not find any, therefore they need to import cheap labor from China or India. Whichever one it is, it was obvious I wasn't getting the job even though I'm only 30 minutes away from the factory.

I once worked for a company that advertised a job that wasn't actually open. Basically, the person in that position was foriegn (Italian) and had just applied for full residency in the U.S. Her employer wanted to keep her on, of course. But apparently they had to prove to the INS that she was most fit for the job, so they had to advertise the job. Not sure what corporate machinations were involved, but they did keep her (and she got residency).

At another place, they had received such a huge number of applications for a specific job, that they decided not to accept any more.

Comment Sounds like Apple (Score 2, Funny) 204

FTA: "We are paying particular attention to style and design; I'm practically obsessed with it," said Patrick Chomet, global director of terminals for Vodafone Group.

Channeling Steve Jobs?

Also: "If the device hits an anticipated price point of between 99 and 199 euros, Ms Milenesi said it would be pitched at the broader phone market. "With that range of prices, it's not aimed at the same audience as, say, the iPhone, it's looking more at a broader appeal for people."

Hmm, how much cheaper than the iPhone is that really? Will people want to save a few euros and miss out on all the cool Apple vibe that iPhone owners magically acquire?

The Military

Submission + - French and British Submarines Collide (cnn.com)

Dekortage writes: Earlier this month, the HMS Vangaurd and the Le Triomphant submarines collided in the Atlantic while each was on practice maneuvers. The subs sustained serious damage. The French had initially reported that their sub had struck a container of some kind. Both subs were carrying nuclear warheads, and not surprisingly, groups that support nuclear disarmament have called the event "a nuclear nightmare of the highest order."

Comment Playing devil's advocate here... (Score 4, Insightful) 610

So Apple is doing this to protect its income for apps on the iPhone store. That also means it is protecting the income of application *developers* who sell through the iPhone store. Sure, they could try to sell apps only for jailbroken phones, but with all the gray areas around it legally (at least in the public's eye) and with the immense ease of use of the iPhone store (click and download right now!), they would much rather go Apple's route. Right? So Apple could be covering its ass, making sure they don't get attacked from iPhone developers who have trekked through the process to make "legit" apps but could be someday losing out to jailbroken competitors.

Or else it's just about the money.

Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft to Sell PCs in Retail Outlets (guardian.co.uk)

Dekortage writes: Microsoft plans to open a line of retail stores to sell PCs, mobile phones, Xbox consoles, and other Microsoft-related products. They've hired David Porter, formerly a Wal-Mart executive and most recently at DreamWorks Animation, to lead the initiative. "There are tremendous opportunities ahead for Microsoft to create a world-class shopping experience for our customers," Porter said in a press release. "I am excited about helping consumers make more informed decisions about their PC and software purchases."

Slashdot Top Deals

Real Users never know what they want, but they always know when your program doesn't deliver it.

Working...