Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Cyber Monday Sale! Courses ranging from coding to project management - all eLearning deals 25% off with coupon code "CYBERMONDAY25". ×

Comment Re:That was easy (Score 1) 867

Part of my concern is my existing Steam library and whether or not I would need to repurchase a majority of the titles I already own.

I'm very impressed with how Valve/Steam handles this situation. When you buy a game on Steam you buy it for all platforms. I used to run Windows and had some Steam games. Then I switched to Linux and any games I had that had a Linux port were available to play. No effort required, they were simply there in the Linux Steam client. A few months later another couple of games I had from the Windows days released Linux ports and they just appeared as available/purchased in my Steam client on their own.

Comment Re:So, Microsoft is a social leech! (Score 5, Insightful) 103

Microsoft contributes something (its patents - so others can use them and make money)

Scenario A: Google back when they initially developed Android ran into a design roadblock. They saw no way to solve the particular problem until one of the developers read a MS patent that solved their issue. MS is therefore paid royalties on their patent.

Scenario B: Google developed Android without ever having heard of any MS patents. Once Android became popular MS lawyers studied their patents trying to stretch them enough to find infringement. They bully the Android phone makers into paying billions. In this scenario Android would have been exactly the same product without the MS patents and MS is being paid billions for nothing.

Scenario A is what the patent system was supposed to be. Scenario B is reality most of the time today. Question is if the few cases of Scenario A justifies all the Scenario B's.

Comment Re:Comcast and Time Warner, a match made in . . . (Score 1) 112

I've lived in Comcast, Cox, and Timewarner cable areas. I'm commenting solely on Internet service, but Timewarner has far and away been the best.

Same experience here. I've had TWC internet-only for 5 years. No outages, no data cap, no artificial slowdowns on "non-approved sites" (AFAIK). There's a local phone number on the bill. The times I've needed service I called it rather than the 800 number and each time I've talked to an on-shore call center that was able to fix the issue.

Now Comcast on the other hand... yuck.

Comment Re:Hmm... I thought it was *my* vehicle. (Score 1) 157

At least in the case of Tesla, the update will only be done if you allow it. The screen displays a message that an update is available and gives you the option of scheduling it for later that day, immediately, or you can close the message. If you close it it will nag you a few times but will eventually stop.

But I could see other manufacturers not giving the option to refuse an update.

Comment Re:I use Gentoo - but not for much longer (Score 1) 175

If package 1.2.3 is incompatible with my Xorg, I'll mask 1.2.3 and newer. There is a slight chance, however, that 1.2.4 will be compatible, but it doesn't matter, since Portage made me masked out 1.2.3 and newer, I'll never even know.

Gentoo lets you mask only a specific version of a package with =package-1.2.3.

Comment Re:uhh (Score 5, Insightful) 549

In Musk's case, though, I don't think he's crazy. I just think he's a charismatic con man looking to line his own pockets by selling a pipe dream.

Really? The man was independently wealthy. He could have bought his own island and lived in luxury the rest of his life. Instead he plowed his entire fortune into Tesla and SpaceX and was a couple of weeks away from losing everything. If the 4th SpaceX launch had failed like the previous 3 or if they hadn't figured out the drivetrain problems on the Tesla roadster he would have nothing now.

I'd think it's pretty clear that Musk is motivated by other things than money. You may agree or disagree with his dream, but there's no question the man is sincere.

"Today's robots are very primitive, capable of understanding only a few simple instructions such as 'go left', 'go right', and 'build car'." --John Sladek