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Comment: Re:Little Knowledge, Big Danger (Score 1) 123

by zlite (#30398172) Attached to: A Critical Look At Open Licensing For Hardware

None of this is true for non mains-powered, non-RF-emitting devices. We make open source hardware (Arduino-based autopilots--diydrones.com) in the US, and there are no such restrictions for us. Please don't generalize about electronics. Small battery-powered devices are easy to make and sell.

Robotics

+ - Can Open Source Be Giving Comfort to the Enemy?-> 2

Submitted by
zlite
zlite writes "We make open source Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (drones), mostly for geomapping and other amateur uses. One of our problems is that most people think of UAVs as Scary Things, and despite our efforts to prove otherwise there's always the risk of regulatory crackdowns. We have amateur UAV participants from around the world, but now they've been joined by an Iranian in Tehran, who's made a UAV in the colors of the Iranian flag. My instinct is that we should welcome everyone, everywhere, but I'm sure some in Washington worry that this looks like helping an "Axis of Evil" country make advanced weapons. They could shut us down with the stroke of a pen. My question: is there ever a case for letting national security issues dictate the limits of an open source project?"
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