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NSA Internet Spying Sparks Race To Create Offshore Havens For Data Privacy 166

Posted by samzenpus
from the keeping-a-lid-on-it dept.
schwit1 writes "Some European leaders are renewing calls for a 'euro cloud,' in which consumer data could be shared within Europe but not outside the region. Brazil is fast-tracking a vote on a once-dormant bill that could require that data about Brazilians be stored on servers in the country. And India plans to ban government employees from using email services from Google and Yahoo Inc. It is too soon to tell if a major shift is under way. But the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation estimates that fallout from revelations about NSA activities could cost Silicon Valley up to $35 billion in annual revenue, much of it from lost overseas business. A survey conducted this summer by the Cloud Security Alliance, an industry group, found that 56% of non-U.S. members said security concerns made it less likely that they would use U.S.-based cloud services. Ten percent said they had canceled a contract. Even some companies that seek to profit from fears about U.S. snooping acknowledge that law-enforcement agencies in other countries want to catch up with Washington's capabilities. 'In the long run, there won't be any difference between what the U.S. or Germany or France or the U.K. is doing,' says Roberto Valerio, whose German cloud-storage company, CloudSafe GmbH, reports a 25% rise in business since the NSA revelations. 'At the end of the day, some agency will spy on you,' he says."

Comment: Re:Deadman switch courier ships (Score 1) 277

by yukk (#44184551) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Permanent Preservation of Human Knowledge?
How about this: Open Source Ecology. A lot of work has gone into this.

And there's a TED Presentation for those post apocalyptic net-surfers.

These guys have the blueprints to go from nothing to somewhat modern. The site goes through mining and metal extraction and refining to building useful machines from plows to 3D printers.

See: Coffee can foundry to Casting and so on to the Global Village Costruction Set of 50 machines designed to make modern life possible.

Software

Hillsborough County (FL) Hackathon is a Sign of Increasing Tech Awareness (Video 30

Posted by Roblimo
from the hackers-meet-in-the-middle-of-xanth dept.
The idea of the Hackathon was to develop either Web or mobile applications that would dovetail with county services and be useful for county workers, county residents or both. The winners got cash prizes, but many people on the nine competing teams weren't aware of them until the closing awards ceremony when the three winners were announced. But then, this is a helpful part of the country where, if an old person falls down on the sidewalk, strangers will rush to her side, whip out cell phones in case a 911 call is needed, and help her to her feet. A hackathon to benefit your neighbors is nothing but an extension of that spirit. One note: Several county employees said this was the first-ever government-organized hackathon around here, but there was a Tampa Mayor's Hackathon last June, and Tampa is the biggest city in Hillsborough County. But this is all good, and Hillsborough hopes to hold a bigger (and hopefully better-publicized) hackathon next year. Meanwhile, there are more home-grown tech events around here every year. April 25 saw the 3rd annual Ignite Tampa event, which brought together people involved in "technology, arts, communications, education, non-profits, the government sector and more" to meet with "the community" -- and local venture capitalists. And the inaugural Sarasota-Bradenton BarCamp is scheduled for May 2 - 5. And so on. Lots of events, many of which combine technology and the arts, which is always a delightful mix -- and one we look forward to seeing even more of in coming years, not only in Florida but everywhere in the world.
Open Source

How To Use a Linux Virtual Private Server 303

Posted by samzenpus
from the listen-up dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "Game developer David Bolton writes: 'For my development of Web games, I've hit a point where I need a Virtual Private Server. (For more on this see My Search for Game Hosting Begins.) I initially chose a Windows VPS because I know Windows best. A VPS is just an Internet-connected computer. "Virtual" means it may not be an actual physical computer, but a virtualized host, one of many, each running as if it were a real computer. Recently, though, I've run into a dead end, as it turns out that Couchbase doesn't support PHP on Windows. So I switched to a Linux VPS running Ubuntu server LTS 12-04. Since my main desktop PC runs Windows 7, the options to access the VPS are initially quite limited, and there's no remote desktop with a Linux server. My VPS is specified as 2 GB of ram, 2 CPUs and 80 GB of disk storage. The main problem with a VPS is that you have to self-manage it. It's maybe 90% set up for you, but you need the remaining 10%. You may have to install some software, edit a config file or two and occasionally bounce (stop then restart) daemons (Linux services), after editing their config files.'"

Comment: Re:I'd like to blame the editors... (Score 1) 87

by yukk (#40608335) Attached to: Cloned Horses Ok To Compete In Olympics

When do you think cloning ATHELETES will become legal? That's something I wouldn't put past the old USSR/East European Block. Remember the "women" atheletes they sent?"

Link to Original Source

What do you mean when will it become legal ? It may not be legal but you can bet that certain countries *cough*China*cough* are already doing that.

For some regimes the only real definition of illegal involves being caught.

Comment: Re:Gabe Newell should treat them to lunch... (Score 1) 473

by yukk (#38732436) Attached to: Ubisoft Has Windows-Style Hardware-Based DRM For Games

These guys are walking billboards highlighting the value of Steam vs the crap DRM-ware of Ubi, Origin, MS Games, etc.

I don't know if it's changed, but I heard Valve was working on a reputation based discount system. Maybe not quite what we're discussing here, but who knows, maybe if you say "Steam Rocks - buy games there because of X" and people do, at the next sale you'll see a coupon for lunch :)

Comment: Re:And they wonder why people pirate (Score 2) 473

by yukk (#38732318) Attached to: Ubisoft Has Windows-Style Hardware-Based DRM For Games
Well, the difference is that in theory they could have made another sale to the person who entered the secondary market. In practice though, that person is in the secondary market for a reason; usually price. So in order to capture that sale the company would have to drop the price after a short intro period, and likely keep dropping the price to hit the thresholds of those (in, say, Australia) who don't want to pay $99.99 (~$US104) for a game but are willing to pay, maybe $40 for a used copy of a game that costs $50 in the U.S.

The companies can't be bothered doing this though, so they try DRM. Luckily Steam has a lot of sales and I guess that's good enough for the publishers.

Microsoft

+ - Upgrading From Windows 1.0 to Windows 7->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "YouTube user Andrew Tait has uploaded a video entitled Chain of Fools : Upgrading through every version of windows. Tait starts with MS DOS 5.0 running Windows 1.0 and keeps upgrading the operating system until he reaches Windows 7, taking note of the changes to system settings and application compatibility along the way."
Link to Original Source
Sci-Fi

+ - Laser Tractor Beams->

Submitted by yukk
yukk (638002) writes "A laser can act as a "tractor beam", drawing small objects back toward the laser's source.
Unlike the optical tweezers version which traps tiny objects in the focus of a laser, using a Bessel beam at a glancing angle should provide a force towards the source of the laser.
Details here."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Chess (Score 2, Interesting) 418

by yukk (#34345630) Attached to: Have I Lost My Gaming Mojo?

I'm in my mid 40's as of about a week ago. I still play games, single and multiplayer, and I still own the kiddies who think they are hot stuff. Getting older doesn't mean you can't have fun.

This could be just how my brain works, but I figure if I'm 40 and I am still able to own kids in fast-paced multiplayer games, then this is actually a BAD thing because it means I've invested way too much time into the game when I should be doing other things with my life. Not to criticize you in any way, it's just a reason why I feel that sucking at such games as one gets older is nothing to be ashamed of at all. Means you've moved onto other, more important things.

No, being able to own those kiddies means his senses, reactions and eye-hand co-ordination are still good at 40. Maybe even great. Let's hope your next surgeon if you need one kicks ass at video games and that the guy behind you on the highway isn't thinking it's too bad his reactions have gone to heck and he can't see well enough to play games any more. Games are just a choice of outlet as someone said. Different things engage different people. That's what makes us individuals.

"If John Madden steps outside on February 2, looks down, and doesn't see his feet, we'll have 6 more weeks of Pro football." -- Chuck Newcombe

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