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Comment Re:They don't set their rates (Score 1) 385

That's true of software contracting as well. Try telling a client you're only billing 3 hours a month sometime, and see how that goes over.

Every client relationship I've held would have (or has!) gone south if I've not committed enough of my company's resources in a timely manner. And for several contracts clients have been dependent on us for "ongoing business needs". Sure, they could contract someone else, but so can Uber.

Client/Employee relationships tend to be evaluated similar to fair use. Even if you're grounded in all measures, it may or may not fly.

Comment Re:No generics (Score 4, Informative) 221

Underscore is ignore. for loops operate in a key/value fashion, so:

for key, value := range values
gives you:
0, 1
1, 2
2, 3

In practice this turns out to be very convenient. You can switch storage between slices and maps without altering your code (both use the same key, value := range x form), and I know that your example above doesn't modify anything stored in values without having to look past the loop declaration.

Comment Why is math so hard? (Score 5, Informative) 127

That title is terrible, and not supported by the article.

The article presents some numbers, quoting Nikolay Testoyedov:

  • Some Russian satellites are 25% imported components, some are made of 75% imported components.
  • Of these imported components, at most 7/8 (87%) come from America
  • So, at MOST, 65% (75% * 87%) of Russian satellite components are from the US.
  • However, this is just an upper bound from what few numbers we have. Taken in context, it seems likely that the average Russian satellite is only 1/3 to 1/2 American components. Still high, but less shocking than the title number.

Now, I think Slashdot gets off the hook for the misleading title, because the firggin article attributes the 75% from the US number to Nikolay Testoyedov and used the same number in its title. But the article title demonstrates some terrible critical math and reading comprehension skills.

Comment Re:32MB? (Score 1) 227

Well, the person who I replied to originally called out the Nest as expensive because of its included micro, under the claim that it had 32MB of ram (IIRC it actually has 64MB).
But I'll take on you're argument that this scale of device won't work on the low end, with the counter-claim that IoT can't work on smaller than this scale (mostly due to a lack of qualified developers).
A few years from now I'd expect to find a micro-controller with 32MB of ram for under $3. In theory a commoditized embedded platform would provide:

  • Much better tooling, particularly for testing.
  • Lower expertise requirements, allowing a company to employ application developers instead of firmware engineers.
  • Decent, standard available libraries - You won't fit a good SSL library on 32KB of flash.
  • Upgrade infrastructure, employable without bricking the device. Imagine if heartbleed were to happen on the IoT world, it would be epic levels of bad news to not have remote upgrade capability. All the companies I work with who do anything like this in industrial applications have remote upgrade capability, leading to much duplicated work that too frequently has errors.
  • A large enough common market to push the prices of beefier microcontrollers even further down.

It seems likely a platform like this, even with mildly higher per-unit functionality would save costs and reduce time to market. I base this claim on the requirements for remote upgrades and secure communications channels — without which the whole IoT idea will never get anywhere — and the fact that there is not a glut of capable talent to build such infrastructure on bare-metal systems.

Of course, IoT could just be a fad buzzword that never amounts to shit for consumer products.

Comment Re:that's fine (Score 1) 408

Accident rate is uninteresting as a percentage of cars, only accidents/miles driven is meaningful. Considering that these are test vehicles and are likely driven far more than your average commuter car, I find the 2x increase in crashes/vehicle statistically meaningless. This of course becomes more complex when you consider other factors, such as that drivers that drive less currently are more likely to get in a crash per 100,000 miles.

Without details I'm not going to accept that you can avoid confirmation bias.

Comment Re:Marijuana's capacity to REVEAL TRUTH (Score 1) 291

I'm not trying to say that firearms are more useful than vehicles, but I think you'll find that you can save more lives by making the roads safer than you can by repealing the 2nd amendment.

If I understand your reasoning correctly, once we reduce traffic fatalities to 5000/year in America, then you will support repealing the 2nd amendment? You freedom hating monster.

In other news, ethical arguments on comparative danger are still meaningless.

Comment Re:Here is the #1 problem with delivery drones (Score 1) 129

Company spends $50,000 on delivery truck. Company dispatches truck on it's first delivery run. Rogue actor uses $5 worth of wrench to jam the driver's noggin, takes key, and steals it. Company is now out $50,000.

Because they are manned, trucks are simply far too easy to lose and far too easy to steal. They are impractical.


1. This does happen (Google had plenty of examples)
2. Rogue actor ends up with a huge volume of parcels that are easier to fence than a specialized machine

Comment Re:Good luck getting theaters on board (Score 1) 92

Besides, your screen at home isn't as good

Not remotely true. Most digital theater projectors are 2k, which at this point I'm willing to call crap. I watched a movie with some subtitles at the beginning the other day, seeing the white text split into a grid of pixels was very off-putting. Plus it takes effort to find optimal seating.

As to audio,
  Headphones do it better, if you really care, and
  The total lack of control of other people makes that a pretty moot point.

I generally agree with you in terms of the market, but trying to argue that most movie theaters are providing a "premium" experience requires a fair bit of romantic idealism coupled with selection bias when you actually go.

Comment Re:Great (Score 2) 44

It would seem your baseless assumptions are wrong.

Sure, that was 3 years ago. But you seem to be ignoring the following facts:

  • AMD's proprietary driver shares most of its code between Windows and Linux.
  • NVIDIA's proprietary driver shares code between Windows, Linux, Solaris, OSX and assorted BSDs.
  • The majority of a device driver has to do with the device itself, and all kernels are trying to get the device to do the same thing and so will expect similar hooks. It is annoying to support multiple targets, but certainly not difficult.

Comment Re:With the right cards it's trivial for video (Score 1) 774

I appreciate the criticism. Did another crack at research, managed to find an xorg.conf that (supposedly) does multiple sessions with one graphics card with the Nvidia driver. I think I'll try to redo the setup this weekend, if I can find the time.

I wish all my side projects were scrutinized by persons as knowledgeable as yourself. Seriously, thanks.

Comment Re:Ignorant too (Score 1) 774

Then there's the people that were running multiple keyboards, mice and monitors for a couple of people on the same box well over a decade back. What is it with Wayland fanboys not having a clue about the system that they are supposed to be improving on?

I setup such a system a year and a half ago (4 stations off one computer, totaling > 10mpx of desktop space).

Allowing me to be abundantly clear: I wish Wayland was production ready a year ago. Multiseat-X sucks for these reasons:

  • You either need a separate graphics card per session, or use framebuffered Xephyr windows to run your desktop (I chose the latter, as performance wasn't a concern, but adding more graphics cards was)
  • Dynamically assigning keyboards/mice to different screens based on a common USB host... sucks. SystemD manages sessions and integrates with udev so a hotplugged USB devices can be limited to it's associated session. Seriously awesome.
  • The above is doubly a problem as when a usb peripheral disconnects momentarily, an X session forgets about it and never sees it again... Fixed by following what was happening with GDB, putting together an awful hack, and nuking X updates from the package system.
  • All users sessions run on the same virtual terminal. I'd often ssh into the system to maintain it rather than my usual ctrl+alt+F1
  • Documentation is erratic and frequently wrong.
  • What I have works, but I would not deploy it to someone else's work environment

All that badness aside, I do appreciate only having to maintain one machine for software updates etc, not having to setup network shares, or worry about users logging in with NFS + LDAP. It made it quite easy for 4 people to share a powerful machine that they only needed the speed from on occasion, and collaboration was super simple.

I look forward to rebuilding this setup with pure SystemD + Wayland in the next 18-24 months.

"You can't get very far in this world without your dossier being there first." -- Arthur Miller