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+ - Are Genes to Blame for Criminals Who Commit Violent Crimes?->

Submitted by concertina226
concertina226 (2447056) writes "Scientists from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have genetically analysed 900 violent offenders in Finland and discovered that those with two particular genes are 13 times more likely to have a history of repeated violent behaviour.

The group of criminals had committed a total of 1,154 murders, manslaughters, attempted homicides and batteries. The researchers created a profile for each criminal according to their offences, classifying them as either violent or non-violent.

Their research, Genetic Background of Extreme Violent Behavior, is published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

The scientists discovered at least 4-10% of all violent crime in Finland was committed by people who had the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene and a variant of the cadherin 13 (CDH13) gene."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Can the US survive 2 more years... (Score 3) 261

by uslurper (#47985427) Attached to: Obama Presses China On Global Warming

Hey if we slip into being a 3rd world country, we can call ourselves a 'developing nation' and ignore the kyoto protocol like china does.

Seriously, "China is running roughshod over us " is not accurate. WE are running roughshod over ourselves.
WE want our cheap stuff and our own companies are happy to invest in factories in China, Myanmar, Malyasia, etc. WE have financed their industrial growth. WE have voted on laws and politicians that enable 'free trade' with countries that cannot afford our own products.

If you want to say you think the US is going in the wrong direction, fine. But follow that up with REAL solutions. How do you suggest we reduce greenhouse gasses? -Gee-wiz, Mr. Keqiang, can you please stop using those coal-powered factories that we paid you to build? Ya, thats going to go real well.

Comment: The rating system on app stores are WAAAYY too g (Score 1) 113

by uslurper (#47751933) Attached to: Is Dong Nguyen Trolling Gamers With "Swing Copters"?

The rating system on app stores are too generic.
And considering 90% of all the apps get like 4.5 stars, the ratings are comepletly useless.
The top downloaded lists are much better, but that makes it near impossible for a new app to get any attention.

When you are looking for apps, you usually are looking for something specific.

For example, I was looking for a professional drawing/painting tool for my kid.
About 99.999% of these apps are more like coloring books for kids.
While there were some very nice tools, none on the top 100 downloaded had the right mix I was looking for.
And some had many of the features i wanted, but were severely lacking in implementation.

A good example may be to compare two top-rated drawing apps.
They are both highly rated and have a ton of downloads, but one is geared for kids and one is geared for professional.
Which app is 'best' for me depends on what I am actually looking for. If I want something for my 6-year old to finger-paint with, I definately do NOT want the pro tools.

I think Apple and Google should driving developers to produce better apps instead of more apps.
And the best apps should be sitting on the top of the hill.

One way I would suggest would be to have a Tag/Rating system. This would allow developers to tag their apps with all the different features they want.
Then users could rate each tag separately.

So for example a drawing app could have a tag for a blur tool (among others). Users could then give a rating specifically for that feature.

Prospective downloaders could then search for apps with that specific set of features and compare apps side by side.
search for: Drawing/painting apps
pick from most tagged:
kids
professional *
easy
color picker *
layers *
bucket fill *
brushes *
Blurr tool *
share on facebook
(and more)

App1
professional - 4
color picker - 5
layers - 3
bucket fill - 4
brushes - 3
Blurr tool - 1
-Total score: 20

App2
professional - 4
color picker - 4
layers - 2
bucket fill - 4
brushes - 3
Blurr tool - 4
-Total score: 21

The same functions could apply to games.

This would help developers compete by showing them what people are looking for, and where there apps need improvement.

Also, there is much logic that could be added beyond the ratings. -How often are apps USED as opposed to downloaded?
Do certain reviewers give blanket 10's? And many ways to get new apps rated.. Can I (automatically) get a free copy of this new app if I agree to rate it?

Comment: Re:Suggest a Tag/Rate system (Score 1) 249

by uslurper (#47674221) Attached to: Apple's App Store Needs a Radical Revamp; How Would You Go About It?

hmm my example did not display properly. So much for plain text.

Trying again:

Prospective downloaders could then search for apps with that specific set of features and compare apps side by side.
search for: Drawing/painting apps
pick from most tagged:
kids
professional *
easy
color picker *
layers *
bucket fill *
brushes *
Blurr tool *
share on facebook
(and more)

App1
professional - 4
color picker - 5
layers - 3
bucket fill - 4
brushes - 3
Blurr tool - 1
-Total score: 20

App2
professional - 4
color picker - 4
layers - 2
bucket fill - 4
brushes - 3
Blurr tool - 4
-Total score: 21

Comment: Suggest a Tag/Rate system (Score 1) 249

by uslurper (#47674159) Attached to: Apple's App Store Needs a Radical Revamp; How Would You Go About It?

The rating system on app stores are waaaayyy too generic.
And considering 90% of all the apps get like 4.5 stars, the ratings are comepletly useless.
The top downloaded lists are much better, but that makes it near impossible for a new app to get any attention.

When you are looking for apps, you usually are looking for something specific.

For example, I was looking for a professional drawing/painting tool for my kid.
About 99.999% of these apps are more like coloring books for kids.
While there were some very nice tools, none on the top 100 downloaded had the right mix I was looking for.
And some had many of the features i wanted, but were severely lacking in implementation.

A good example may be to compare two top-rated drawing apps.
They are both highly rated and have a ton of downloads, but one is geared for kids and one is geared for professional.
Which app is 'best' for me depends on what I am actually looking for. If I want something for my 6-year old to finger-paint with, I definately do NOT want the pro tools.

I think Apple and Google should driving developers to produce better apps instead of more apps.
And the best apps should be sitting on the top of the hill.

One way I would suggest would be to have a Tag/Rating system. This would allow developers to tag their apps with all the different features they want.
Then users could rate each tag separately.

So for example a drawing app could have a tag for a blur tool (among others). Users could then give a rating specifically for that feature.

Prospective downloaders could then search for apps with that specific set of features and compare apps side by side.
search for: Drawing/painting apps
pick from most tagged:
kids
professional Total score: 20

App2
professional - 4
color picker - 4
layers - 2
bucket fill - 4
brushes - 3
Blurr tool - 4
>Total score: 21

This would help developers compete by showing them what people are looking for, and where there apps need improvement.

Also, there is much logic that could be added beyond the ratings. -How often are apps USED as opposed to downloaded?
Do certain reviewers give blanket 10's? And many ways to get new apps rated.. Can I (automatically) get a free copy of this new app if I agree to rate it?

Comment: Americans have a social stigma to math (Score 2) 688

by uslurper (#47075653) Attached to: Professors: US "In Denial" Over Poor Maths Standards

If you look at the american culture vs. academics, you will see that for decades academics have had a social stigma attached to them. Especially mathematics which appears to be the most "nerdy" of them all.

Just look at how movie and tv culture ridicules the smart kids and idolizes the athletic, attractive, charismatics. Many stories are about the 'maverik' who doesnt follow the rules and goes by the 'gut' feeling overcomes the odds and wins the day. Even the science fiction buys into this! Examples: Captain Kirk sleeps around, cheats on his tests, has other people do his science and engineering. Spock has a great intellect, but is really a comic character and only wins when he goes with his 'human' side. The android Data really just wants to be human and have feelings.. doesnt care about making scientific breakthroughs even though he has the intellect for it. Luke uses the "force" -a mysterious power that is a metaphor for having a lot of "heart".

None of the stories talk about years of study, winning because you are better prepared, succeeding by hard work, etc.

Comment: How does the rotation speed affect gravity? (Score 1) 34

by uslurper (#46891335) Attached to: Astronomers Determine the Length of Day of an Exoplanet

How does the rotation affect the gravity of a planet?
If the planet is rotating fast enough, does that reduce the force of gravity, or does the gravity still 'squash' you since it is actually affecting the space around it.

For example, if there was a planet with twice the mass of Earth, but spinning twice as fast, what would it be like to stand on the surface?

Do black holes spin? -or are they 'locked in' because the mass would be impossible to move.

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