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Comment: Re:an historical perspective (Score 1) 151

by tohasu (#35592120) Attached to: New FBI System IDs People By Voice, Iris, More
How's this? "Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty."-Thomas Jefferson any better? I thought bringing up the "NAZis" was a little mean-spirited -- isn't there a "law" about that -- in any political argument someone will bring up Hitler before X number of exchanges? How predictable. My point is that the preservation of freedom requires a vigorous commitment.

Comment: an historical perspective (Score 3, Informative) 151

by tohasu (#35587966) Attached to: New FBI System IDs People By Voice, Iris, More
It's interesting to read this discussion on the anniversary of a famous speech in American history (1775). “There is no longer any room for hope. If we wish to be free ... we must fight! ... Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace — but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! ... Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” Partick Henry to the Second Virginia Convention.

Comment: Re:what is lost what is gained (Score 1) 305

by tohasu (#32893178) Attached to: Do Home Computers Help Or Hinder Education?
I think you make good points, but of course technology will replace traditional skills. That's the whole purpose of it. New skills will be needed. We don't have to manage horses if we have horsepower, but we might have to know how to fix a flat. But mostly what I want to get at is the whole orientation we bring to trying to understand new technology. We quite naturally use the old framework that the technology will be instrumental in replacing -- gradually if not suddenly. So we tend to end up with information about what is being lost. Trying to figure out what is gained in much more complicated -- maybe impossible.

Comment: what is lost what is gained (Score 3, Insightful) 305

by tohasu (#32887076) Attached to: Do Home Computers Help Or Hinder Education?
Most of the studies I've seen about the impact of NEW technology on kids and education measure OLD skills and come up with statements about what is LOST. "Math skills" is a good example. How many of you were not allowed to use calculators in math class? Raise your hands. I remember when they were thought to imperil "math skills." A few educators saw them as game-changers and recognized that they enabled students even as they called for the development of new skills -- or a shift in the importance of various components of the skill set. It's very hard to see the real impact of new technology just because it's new. The things kids are learning from computers are things we have no words for - yet. I have confidence that there is learning going on, it's just not going to be learning that will enable business-as-usual to continue, so of course it's threatening.

Comment: analog "information" (Score 1) 883

by tohasu (#21171307) Attached to: Vinyl To Signal the End for CDs?
"Another reason for vinyl's sonic superiority is that no matter how high a sampling rate is, it can never contain all of the data present in an analog groove," Lots of posts seem to take it for granted that more informatin represents better music. I grew up with vinyl and I can tell you that a lot of the "information" came in the form of background noise (hiss and pops). When I played my first CD, I was stunned by what I didn't hear -- and I am not in the line to go back to vinyl.

Pound for pound, the amoeba is the most vicious animal on earth.

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