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Comment: Re:College course ? (Score 1) 177

by tixxit (#42528755) Attached to: UC's For-Pay Online Course Draws 4 Non-UC Students
I'm assuming the US is like Canada (where I went to school). If so, then chances are that if you went into any remotely math related field you took a course like this in HS (as it was required for admission). However, my University still offered a similar course, for those students who switched majors or whose major didn't do any math in the first semester and decided to not take it in HS.

Comment: Re:$5000 Canadian (Score 2) 172

Sure. Canadians don't really pay much more than those in the US do (I would know, I just moved to the US and am now paying US income tax). However, for that little bit extra, Canadians get good health care, great public schools and substantially better social programs. For example, my wife can actually take 10 months off after having a baby and not have to worry about money.

Comment: Re:What's the point? (Score 1) 172

Basically, the Tories, whether they intended to or not, have made pursuit of non-commercial infringers a no-win scenario.

I don't have any love for the Tories, but let's give credit where it is due. They knew full well what they were doing and stated on several occasions that they wanted to discourage IP holders from pursuing non-commercial infringers.

Comment: Re:This just in , shitty movie blames piracy . (Score 1) 172

On the other hand, this law was just the gov't putting its money where its mouth is after years of saying they have no interest in non-commercial copyright infringement. Even if the old laws are used, I don't think Voltage will find much sympathy in Cdn courts. At least, that's what I hope!

Comment: Re:They should act like Kryptonite. (Score 2) 244

Intel recalled all processors with the FDIV bug back in the 90s and are still king of the hill today. However, very few companies have the resources to take a hit like that and come out intact. If they aren't offering the fix for free, it is probably because they just cannot afford it. I'm sure they are not completely brain dead and realize this looks bad to them. Most likely, they did more research leading up to this decision than we did.

Comment: Re:Basic testing is cheap, $200 (Score 1) 244

by tixxit (#40366147) Attached to: My thoughts on getting my own DNA tested:
The problem is that you are incredibly unique. You won't get a list of a handful of genes. You'd get a list of thousands and thousands of variants (if you actually get sequenced). Many of these variants are common. Many will be errors (cheap sequencing uses shorter reads which have higher error rates). Many won't actually affect gene function. What do you expect to do with this? To make this useful, you have to make a lot of choices, many of which will be somewhat suspect.

Comment: Re:That Moment (Score 4, Informative) 414

by tixxit (#40129287) Attached to: 350-Year-Old Newton's Puzzle Solved By 16-Year-Old
The article states the father taught him calculus when he was 6. However, his father also says the kid passed his understanding a while ago and he doesn't understand the math used to solve this problem. Seems like the father was responsible for instilling a curiosity and some foundations, but after that it's all just this kid. You gotta give him credit.

Comment: Re:Like what? Buying Apple more ethnically sound. (Score 1) 178

I remember several years ago (5 maybe?), a report came out about how "green" various laptop manufacturers were. Lenovo won, flat out. Apple was the worst. A couple years later, Apple was on top and boasting about it. However, they changed because the spotlight was put on them. They work to a different standard now because people are holding them to a higher standard. So, it's not all altruistic. But this doesn't really matter, as your point still holds (now, anyways).

"Irrationality is the square root of all evil" -- Douglas Hofstadter

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