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Comment: Cost is for hosted service more than software? (Score 1) 345

by therealmorris (#33773240) Attached to: Minnesota Moving To Microsoft's Cloud
Surely the real cost they're paying here is for the "cloud services", and so the price would be similar whether or not the software behind it is OSS or not? Or is the argument just anti-MS really? It sounds like there's some saving from a previous move to MS Exchange and the licensing deal from that as well though.

Comment: Joystiq reckons it's a publicity stunt? (Score 5, Informative) 326

by therealmorris (#33630760) Attached to: DRM-Free Games Site GOG.com Gone

It's starting to look like the platform's shutdown is just a marketing stunt. Good Old Games spokesman Tom Ohle told us that "as the site says, this doesn't mean GOG is dead. We will have more to share in the next couple of days." A NeoGAF poster dug up a Polish business forum, in which CD Projekt co-founder Micha Kiciski purportedly mentions a conference dated for this Wednesday, adding, "we'll post information about this soon on GOG.com (please do not panic after reading the information contained there.)" We'll keep an eye out for more info.

Joystiq

Comment: Re:I'm all for it (Score 2, Insightful) 832

by therealmorris (#33626034) Attached to: Intel Wants To Charge $50 To Unlock Your CPU's Full Capabilities
Problem is, if they're selling these unlock cards then the chips can't just be disabled "when it needs more chips in the economy bin and less in the high-end one", they must be using better chips and artificially disabling every single one, or else how would anyone know if the card would work! That I think is the issue here.
Image

Anti-Speed Camera Activist Buys Police Department's Web Domain 680

Posted by samzenpus
from the I-bought-the-law dept.
Brian McCrary just bought a website to complain about a $90 speeding ticket he received from the Bluff City PD — the Bluff City Police Department site. The department let its domain expire and McCrary was quick to pick it up. From the article: "Brian McCrary found the perfect venue to gripe about a $90 speeding ticket when he went to the Bluff City Police Department's website, saw that its domain name was about to expire, and bought it right out from under the city's nose. Now that McCrary is the proud owner of the site, bluffcitypd.com, the Gray, Tenn., computer network designer has been using it to post links about speed cameras — like the one on US Highway 11E that caught him — and how people don't like them."
The Internet

A New Neutral, Long-Haul Fiber Network 129

Posted by kdawson
from the shaking-up-the-neighborhood dept.
techclicker sends word on the ambitious plans of Allied Fiber to disrupt the long-haul business in the US. The company is embarking on the first phase of a planned six-phase build-out of dark fiber, towers, and co-lo facilities ringing the US. The first three phases are budgeted at $670M; the last three are not yet laid out in detail (announcement, PDF). Phase 1 is scheduled for completion in 2010. Allied's business model of selling wholesale bandwidth to all comers is in sharp contrast to that of incumbents such as AT&T, who won't sell backhaul to potential competitors. "Allied is deploying a 432-count, long-haul cable coupled with the 216-count, short-haul cable that will be a composite of Single-Mode and Non-Zero Dispersion Shifted fibers. Allied Fiber has implemented a new, multi-duct design for intermediate access to the long-haul fiber duct through a parallel short-haul fiber duct all along the route. This enables all points between the major cities, including wireless towers and rural networks, to gain access to the dark fiber. In addition, the Allied Fiber neutral colocation facilities, located approximately every 60 miles along the route, accommodate and encourage a multi-tenant interconnection environment integrated with fiber that does not yet exist in the United States on this scale."

Comment: Re:It's the freeloaders time (Score 2, Informative) 1051

by therealmorris (#31390086) Attached to: Ars Technica Inveighs Against Ad Blocking
Ars is pay per view:

There is an oft-stated misconception that if a user never clicks on ads, then blocking them won't hurt a site financially. This is wrong. Most sites, at least sites the size of ours, are paid on a per view basis.

http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2010/03/why-ad-blocking-is-devastating-to-the-sites-you-love.ars

Comment: Re:As an Australian Resident,,, (Score 1) 277

But then, as it seems to be in America now, shops will just not stock games with these high ratings to avoid any risk of incurring the fine, effectively the same fate as if it had been banned anyway.

For the record, I and all of my friends (we're 17) play violent video games, but we are capable of distinguishing between real life and the games ourselves.

Australia

New Aliens Vs. Predator Game Doesn't Make It Past AU Ratings Board 277

Posted by Soulskill
from the gauntlet-thrown dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Australia refused to give Rebellion's new Aliens Vs. Predator game a rating, effectively banning it in the country. Rebellion says it won't be submitting an edited version for another round of classifications, however. (As Valve did with Left 4 Dead 2.) They said, 'We will not be releasing a sanitized or cut down version for territories where adults are not considered by their governments to be able to make their own entertainment choices.'"

Comment: Re:What Part of "No" Don't You Understand? (Score 1) 267

by therealmorris (#29443981) Attached to: BBC Wants DRM On HD Broadcasts

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