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Comment Re:For the Nth Time (Score 1) 156

That's not an explanation. It's bullshit handwaving. Women can do whatever they want, and make up the majority of college graduates, and have for 30 years: If most of them choose a career path that isn't "Code Monkey", who's to say that they've made the wrong choice? The next question, then, is, "For whom is this actually bad?"

And who really wants to be a code monkey, anyway? Big coding shops are more like an assembly line. The pay is good because of competition -- or at least it will be until the market is even more flooded with "programmers."

Comment Re:the French Dream (Score 1) 284

What about the French dream... what's wrong with pursuing your dreams in France or any other country for that matter?

We changed that to the "Freedom dream." Along with freedom fries, freedom kissing, the freedom braid, freedom toast, renamed the Gene Hackman movie "The Freedom Connection," and freedom onion soup.

Comment Re:Are they going to bother notifying us?! (Score 1) 43

Or, how about the fact (yes, fact) that most people [citation needed] use the same password for a variety of services? A unique enough email address can lead to one's online identity being discovered, and now the nefarious turd has your password.

Then again, maybe the person already checked those vectors and is just trying to make a little more money off the list.

Comment Re:Not programming semantics, but the coder (Score 1, Interesting) 576

.Such code is the result of coders who rely on the compiler too much, and their brains too little.

I work in .Net -- *ducks* -- and it happens quite often that people rely on Intellisense and the fact that their code compiles as validation it is correct. We don't have to allocate memory, so we don't think about how we use objects that require database calls; we don't think about scope; there's a plug-in that will refactor code for you, so there's another crutch to give us more time to think about what we will be doing when we get off work.

Also, get off my lawn.

Comment Re:Price tags are the greatest innovation of retai (Score 1) 439

Look at the places where people still haggle over crap like a bag of rice or a pair of pants. Their economies are always underdeveloped with a low standard of living. Moreover, look at the most successful retailers: Walmart, Amazon, Target, that Swedish furniture chain, etc. They all have posted prices. They dominate global retail. If haggling was efficient and productive then some Egyptian or Bangladeshi retail chains would dominate global retail. This is not the case. The price tag was one of the most important innovations of capitalism. So why the fuck do we still by cars like some old lady in a 3rd world market haggling over some melons?

Walmart and other big chains offer rock bottom prices compared to smaller operations by amortizing losses over a broad range of products and geography. Lose money or make very little on this product; make a large margin on something else.

That said, I prefer not to haggle over the price of goods. But that said, other models like the sort-of-but-not-really crowd funding model of Gustin are intriguing.

Comment Re:Price tags are the greatest innovation of retai (Score 2) 439

4. People who aren't dependent-buyers.

The ability to walk away is important. If you are shopping for a car because your car died and you don't have super credit or savings, haggling works about as well as bluffing in poker. You may not have the stomach for that, but it isn't the fault of the haggling system.

Leveraging always beats prototyping.