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Comment: Re:And when capped internet comes then people will (Score 1) 279

by thedonger (#49536911) Attached to: German Court Rules Adblock Plus Is Legal

I didn't realize they had that. It is a start. What I would really like is a la carte channel packages instead of bundles. But I know that isn't likely to happen any time soon because so many channels would be free-marketed into oblivion when ad revenue plummets because only a tiny fraction of the consumers want them.

On the other hand, maybe the lack of cheap accessibility is good. If the bar of media consumption is lowered too much, we may see a generation of people completely give themselves over to leisure.

The further removed we are from having to work hard, the more we forget what was sacrificed for the free time we enjoy.

Comment: Re:And when capped internet comes then people will (Score 1) 279

by thedonger (#49527725) Attached to: German Court Rules Adblock Plus Is Legal

Caps are important to them because they see their cable monopoly slipping away as Netflix, HBO, et. al. offer a la carte purchase options that bypass their subscription based model.

If only content creators truly were providing a la carte content. HBO Go requires a subscription to a traditional service provider. Hulu is artificially restricted, and has ads. Netflix is marginalized by content providers striking deals with Amazon, Apple, and others, making their best content Korean action films and their original series. In the sports world, ESPN streaming requires subscription to a traditional service provider, and Fox Sports, the only one that offers their service separate from a traditional service provider (at $20 per month), was priced out of the Premier League market by NBC -- whose sports service requires subscription to a traditional service provider.

Comment: Re:Wonderful. (Score 1) 252

by thedonger (#49527601) Attached to: Twitter Rolls Out New Anti-Abuse Tools

Spend any amount of time on Twitter and it is clear that "abuse" in forms other than malicious is rampant. For example, the guy with 17k followers who follows 18k people. His whole Twitter ring is a meaningless bunch of follows/followers/retweets designed to make people look (or feel) popular. In the end, it is just noise.

Unless I missed something, that was pretty much a synopsis of the Twitter business plan.

I think they thought it would be neat for people to be able to let others know they were pooping and whatnot. But then people with lots of followers started making money off of the resulting notoriety, and suddenly a cottage industry of allegedly helping people make money off it sprang up.

I've seen Twitter accounts that do nothing more than re-tweet. I don't get it.

Comment: Re:Wonderful. (Score 4, Insightful) 252

by thedonger (#49521851) Attached to: Twitter Rolls Out New Anti-Abuse Tools

Spend any amount of time on Twitter and it is clear that "abuse" in forms other than malicious is rampant. For example, the guy with 17k followers who follows 18k people. His whole Twitter ring is a meaningless bunch of follows/followers/retweets designed to make people look (or feel) popular. In the end, it is just noise.

Comment: Re:...Coming Soon (Score 3, Funny) 399

Drug sniffing dogs are no more addicted to drugs than bomb sniffing dogs are addicted to explosives, cash sniffing dogs addicted to cash or cadaver sniffing dogs addicted to dead people. Seriously, dogs have keen noses and will find whatever they are trained to find. The rumor that dogs are turned into drug addicts in order to find drugs is pure unadulterated bullshit.

Except this one cash sniffing dog I saw -- gold grills; Rolex; diamond studs in his ears as large as dog biscuits...

Comment: Re:A sane supreme court decision? (Score 1) 399

That was a second detention, done without probable cause (since he had already dealt with the reason for the stop), and was therefore unlawful.

The lack of probable cause is not related to the fact that the officer already dealt with the reason for the stop. Hypothetically speaking, on the officer's return to the vehicle he could have noticed something that would lead to the moving violation turning into a longer detention. That was apparently not the case here.

Comment: Re:thank God they didn't have computers.... (Score 1) 629

Wrong.

It's a crime. It's a computer crime, and you're supposed to know that.

By the letter of the law it is a computer crime, but by intention it is an act of vandalizing a computer. Those are two very different things. If he looked up test answers, changed grades, or altered attendance records, then I would accept it as a computer crime. This is an instance of blind application of a law.

We don't really understand it, so we'll give it to the programmers.

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