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Comment: Re:No more HollyWood films in ... (Score 1) 233

by teumesmo (#33474820) Attached to: Brazil Considering Legalizing File Sharing

Frankly, if you consider people's hysteria in regard to criminals "taking over" or their plans to take over Rio de Janeiro or São Paulo, the Police death squads have been quite tame in recent years. I'm just pointing out a upwards of 1 trillion USD(Based on world consumption of 600,000+ kilos) coke trade flows through Brazil to the rest of the world, although statistically none of it is grown in Brazil. Sure, police doing what they learned during the military dictatorship in order to make their jobs relatively tenable is atrocious, Brazilian government should just legalize coke, but of course you may choose to stand on your soap box and enumerate the benefits of stopping the drug trade, how it should be done, and berate the police for not being composed of stoical suicidal saints, but surely you won't mind me pointing out the insanity of your logic.

Comment: Re:No more HollyWood films in ... (Score 1) 233

by teumesmo (#33472544) Attached to: Brazil Considering Legalizing File Sharing

Have you tried either either Australia or Canada? Sure, it's not as flashy as say, San Francisco, but due to their minuscule demographic density, they're much more receptive to taking in strays. To my knowledge, US identities are a breeze to forge, and accents are just a fact of life in the US, don't let strict VISA rules keep you oppressed in unholy backwaters.

Comment: Re:No more HollyWood films in ... (Score 2, Interesting) 233

by teumesmo (#33472520) Attached to: Brazil Considering Legalizing File Sharing

If the US loses the Brazilian presidential elections this year, we(Brazilians) will be in world of shit. I have already seen a few minor US news articles in which Brazil is is honored with the hip tag "enemy state", and grouped with Cuba, North Korea, Syria, Iran and Libya. It should be interesting observing a "crisis of democracy" first hand, notice how government had to contest to audit the Brazilian voting machines a while ago.

Comment: Re:Wrong (Score 1) 372

by teumesmo (#33211058) Attached to: FBI Prioritizes Copyright Over Missing Persons

Funny, aren't the copyright freaks the same people who advocate Corporate efficiency? Except the FBI kicking down your door for copyright infringement is, surprisingly, even more American than being sued out of existence.

I for one believe there's no excuse for the FBI having a sizable enough DNA backlog, that it becomes news, or even worse, common knowledge. After all, this is a simple test, they aren't mapping an individual's whole genome to 4gb files.

Comment: Re:Does the US still have working atomic bombs? (Score 1) 173

by teumesmo (#32862736) Attached to: NASA's Plutonium Supply Dwindling; ESA To Help

So you're saying US generals will idly sit on their hands while nuclear arsenal half-lifes itself out of service? I'm pretty sure even enlightened states like the US of A has laws against desertion.

So Russia retrofitting a large part of their nuclear arsenal to hair-trigger readiness in response to certain claims about the US's nuclear arsenal was what, a Microsoft ploy to sell Windows !@#$ Advanced Server?

Comment: Re:Does the US still have working atomic bombs? (Score 1) 173

by teumesmo (#32859692) Attached to: NASA's Plutonium Supply Dwindling; ESA To Help
Please, that's so unlikely as to be laughable. Obviously the US Ministry of Defense isn't content with its 1+ trillion USD budget, and is pushing for a couple extra hundred billions.

To my knowledge, less than 1/7 of the cores of uranium based warheads show any likelihood of not detonating properly, while virtually none of the cores of plutonium based warheads show any decreased potential for criticality. Not that it really matters, US government can always ask Israel to nuke whom it pleases, including Israel itself and US territory, I'm sure someone can think up a use for that.

These are the types of things that only happen to NASA, lost recipes of high temperature materials, inability to access data in old hardware, imperial/metric clusterfucks, ever decreasing budget, material shortages. All due to, what I hope, is their inability to impose dependable control on technocrats operating under a sacrosanct umbrella, the main trademark of NASA, although the expediency of funneling the money elsewhere, military space programs, nuclear shield research, while destroying the public image of NASA, is hardly negligible.

Comment: Re:We will always have deep sea exploration.... (Score 1) 720

by teumesmo (#30053914) Attached to: Whistleblower Claims IEA Is Downplaying Peak Oil
As it so happens, I'm only a lowly Brazilian, I would have a hell of a lot of inconveniences  buying "big oil" stock.

I understand part of your point of view, but taking the pedantic plunge, I would like to paraphrase Chomsky, who mentions how big business socializes costs(middle eastern wars) and privatizes profits. The only reason they can pump that oil so cheap(say, 5 USD a barrel) is because of all the public money funneled into keeping such volatile region stable. Although USA citizens are quite accustomed to cheap petroleum products, it doesn't fully reflect the tax burden laid upon them for that privileged, which in the words of Adam Smith, means they are paying the exorbitant profits of stock twice for the same commodity, but of course only "big oil" gets its share.

Comment: We will always have deep sea exploration.... (Score 1) 720

by teumesmo (#30051252) Attached to: Whistleblower Claims IEA Is Downplaying Peak Oil
Judging by Brazil's exploits, by actually spending, as Brazil does, some 40 dollars per barrel in operational costs(deep sea exploration), I think peak oil might still be 100 years away. Hopefully big oil's addiction to their own criminal profiteering will lead them to cleaner(more profitable by a factor of 100) alternatives, unless they figure they are rich enough already, and decide to take a "moral" stand to us mere mortals.

Comment: A fool's input. (Score 2, Interesting) 1345

by teumesmo (#29320421) Attached to: Schooling, Homeschooling, and Now, "Unschooling"
It brings a smile to my face reading comments commending the inadequacy of the system for separating the grain from the sheaf, those who always felt smart enough for most tasks, and those who eventually succeeded in spite of everything. You see, you have 2 specially unprepared individuals, except for their respective pathologies, whereby the idolatry perpetuated by pathologically successful effectively creates the cesspool seen as required for the creation of more pathologically driven individuals. Perpetuation of the species?

Anyways, if we, as a society, can't agree upon on what is actually important, Practical Knowledge or Erudition, street smarts and books smarts, populism or elitism, perhaps it would be worthwhile to forgo both and invest in improving artistic, logical and semantical(or as defined by psychology, such as logical, linguistic, spatial, musical, kinesthetic, naturalist, intrapersonal and interpersonal) skills in the young, when they first went the education system. Replace kindergarten and first to fourth grade teachers with only the well spoken, unprejudiced, and emotionally mature. Perhaps a rotational system were teachers are forced out of their comfort level, and all teachers are at least high school level.

La Morte e il Nulla. E vecchia fola il Ciel.

IF I HAD A MINE SHAFT, I don't think I would just abandon it. There's got to be a better way. -- Jack Handley, The New Mexican, 1988.

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