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Comment: If you don't get caught you didn't do it... (Score 2) 209

by tenchima (#44568783) Attached to: US, Germany To Enter No-Spying Agreement
According to Wikipedia: "Espionage or spying involves a government or individual obtaining information considered secret or confidential without the permission of the holder of the information. Espionage is inherently clandestine, as it is taken for granted that it is unwelcome and, in many cases illegal and punishable by law." I think the operative word here is clandestine...

Comment: Re:The SCO Group - Not Santa Cruz Operation (Score 1) 157

by tenchima (#41059373) Attached to: CowboyNeal Looks Back at the SCO-Linux Trials

Actually - I stand corrected on that. I never had much dealings with Bryan Sparks, but Ransom Love seemed genuinely interested in trying to make the two companies work together. I think I saw the writing on the wall when he left. I don't hate Caldera per se, but as for the hacks who came in after Sparks and Love to run it...

There seemed to be a belief that through some sort of osmosis SCO UNIX users would just transfer to Caldera Linux. There was however no firm path defined for users how to do this. When the bubble burst, and no more investment money came in, there seemed to be a desperate scrabble to bring money in from the only paying source available, which was SCO UNIX, not Caldera Linux. Of course, support can be a problem when you already let a good part of your UNIX engineering and support staff go...

 

Comment: The SCO Group - Not Santa Cruz Operation (Score 4, Informative) 157

by tenchima (#41057241) Attached to: CowboyNeal Looks Back at the SCO-Linux Trials

Just wanted to remind people that this farce was initiated by the company called Caldera when they bought SCO (The Santa Cruz Operation). They renamed themselves The SCO Group ("...SCO no longer means Santa Cruz Operation..."), but it was still the Caldera management calling the shots.

The Santa Cruz Operation was a good company to work for. I can't say the same for Caldera. When the take-over occurred, the lucky ones (IMHO) go to go to Tarantella (eventually subsumed into what was Sun). The red-headed step-children got to stay behind with the sinking ship. And boy, was I ^H ^H ^H ^H ^H were they glad top be let go before the Darl McBride hit the fan.

Comment: A mixed approach might be worth considering (Score 1) 227

by tenchima (#40729801) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Stepping Down From an Office Server To NAS-Only?

Having used various Synology NAS devices over the years, I can recommend them. Although if you buy any of their devices that can have a memory upgrade, I recommend following their requirements to the letter. We have had an instance where using memory that on paper was identical, turned out to by slightly different and bricked the whole system (Synology, to their credit, replaced the system at no cost).

As with any device on site, backups that go off-site are very important. If you don't do this, then the cloud option as a backup is a good idea. If you choose the cloud option as a primary, remember that all devices that get you to the cloud (Local switch, Firewall, router, ISP feed etc) are all now single points of failure that can cause you to lose access to your data for a period of time.

Comment: Debian / Ubuntu Qmail Rocks (Score 1) 554

by tenchima (#37015084) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Self-Hosted Gmail Alternatives?

Not sure if anyone has mentioned this, - a quick search did not flag it.

I used the older version of Qmail Rocks installation instructions on Fedora up to 12. Then decided it was too much trouble to keep up with the updates in Fedora, and at which time all internet references to Qmail Rocks for Fedora disappeared - the version I was using was really old anyway, and I had updated various components myself.

However, I then found this link: http://qmailrocks.thibs.com/

Which is an updated version (last update Feb 2011) for Debian. I actually installed it on Ubuntu Desktop 32 bit (64 bit fails).

The installation following the instructions was comparatively quick and easy and it uses RoundCube which to my mind is a less clunky looking Web interface than Squirrelmail which was used on the Fedora version.

Currently have a Dell Server set up and ready to switch over. Looks clean and stable.

Good luck.

Hold on to the root.

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