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Comment: Re:BMI is a lie! (Score 3, Informative) 329

by teg (#46965899) Attached to: Gaining On the US: Most Europeans To Be Overweight By 2030

If you cycle, then I suggest doing your BMI maths to find out how obse you are, BMI FUCKING SUCKS! Muscle is heavier than fat, bmi is your weight in relation to you high. therefore if you have a maximum about of muscle then you come in at Obse on this stupid fucking scale. Fuck all fat on me, mostly skinny build, have some nice leg muscles, no real arm or back muscles, no fat gut, im 183cms and 95KGs.. Overweight to the point that if I put on more weight i'm Obese!

BMI is not perfect. However, unless you are a weightlifter or outrageously fit (not just "skinny fit", but bulging muscles) it's a pretty good indicator. And it's pretty easy to know if you are in the extremely fit part - if you're thinking about it, you aren't.

Comment: Re:Q: Why Are Scientists Still Using FORTRAN in 20 (Score 1) 634

by teg (#46965233) Attached to: Why Scientists Are Still Using FORTRAN in 2014

A: Legacy code, and because Fortran 2003+ is a very good modern language for scientific computation and maps very naturally to problems

See.... Fortran 2003 is more modern than ISO 1999 C.... Now that that's settled... How come people are still programming in languages like C/C++/Java, when Fortran2003 is available?

The GP did write for scientific computation. Fortran maps naturally to scientific calculcation, and doing linear algebra in Fortran rather than C is faster to develop, easier to read and faster to run. That doesn't meant that Fortran is a good fit for everything, I pity the developer trying to implement an SQL database or an operating system in Fortran. But for scientific computation, it's often extremely competetive.

Comment: Re:Communism is the only way forward (Score 1) 870

by teg (#46586961) Attached to: Job Automation and the Minimum Wage Debate

Pure capitalism is letting the market decide which leads to the monopolization of industries.

Nope.

Nobody's ever succeeded in establishing a coercive monopoly without government backing. In a free market, monopoly is a non-issue. For example, when Alcoa was the only vendor of Aluminum in the United States, the pricing of aluminum fell continuously.

-jcr

Standard Oil and Bell says otherwise, in different ways.

The first one is just a matter of "are you big enough, ruthless enough and no rules stop you, you can get rid of competition that way".

The second one - Bell - is interesting. For some services, like telephony, if you don't have government regulation you will get a natural monopoly. The phone companies would earn more money if they merged - no need to ever compete on price, or duplicate infrastructure. The price would be based on the value to consumers, not on the marginal cost of providing it as in a perfect market. And competition would be hard to come by - refuse to receive and make calls to this network. Knowing this, a competetive network would never appear in the first place.

Comment: Re:Coastline Paradox & Audiophilia (Score 1) 413

There is no need for a new format. The idea that LPs are better is hogwash. The only time LPs sound better is when they are mastered with more dynamic range than whatever you are comparing them to is.

That statement requires you to define "better". An LP, with all its limitations (a CD can contain all the information on the LP, and more), can still sound better to someone who likes that particular distortion. Or has a deeper experience because of the entire ritual of listening to an LP, caused by other limitations - cleaning it before playing, listening to the entire record in the sequence the artist/producer wanted it, look at the cover etc.

Comment: Re:Reality check (Score 1) 413

Most of the point would be to go from MP3 or AAC to lossless. While a 320 kbps mp3 made today will sound far better than a 128 kbps mp3 made fifteen years ago, it still a lossy algorithm that tries to remove sound most people will miss the least. That doesn't mean it's not gone.

Going from CD quality to 24/96 would be another matter, and not likely to bring much, if any, benefit.

Comment: Re:so let me get this straight (Score 4, Insightful) 348

by teg (#46375185) Attached to: Tim Cook: If You Don't Like Our Energy Policies, Don't Buy Apple Stock

not only does apple control everything about the phones we buy, but they think they can tell the owners to fuck off? One more reason that I wont ever buy another apple product

The owners agreed with Cook - the right wing loonie didn't get support from the rest of the shareholders. Which makes sense, as Apple needs not only to have the current premium products associated with its brand, but align with its potential customers - and above all, avoid really bad associations. Or just being boring.

Image is very important for premium brands - and that's what the majority of the shareholders wants Tim Cook to continue to cultivate, alongside its innovation focus.

Comment: Re:Attention Fanboys (Score 1) 120

by teg (#46303253) Attached to: Drive-by Android Malware Exploits Unpatchable Vulnerability

Android: Tell me again why you think your platform is more secure when the vast majority of the user base cannot access software updates?

BlackBerry: Anyone at BlackBerry can easily intercept everything your phone does, so don't even try.

iOS: No, your fingerprint scanner does not make your phone more secure. Get over it.

What about Windows Phone? Just because you haven't seen one, it doesn't mean they don't exist. People who thought the same about unicorns have been proven wrong.

Comment: Re:Attention Fanboys (Score 2) 120

by teg (#46303225) Attached to: Drive-by Android Malware Exploits Unpatchable Vulnerability

iOS: No, your fingerprint scanner does not make your phone more secure. Get over it.

Apple doesn't say its safer. In fact, Apple considers LESS safe than the PIN, because you can always enter the PIN. Or if the reader fails to get a valid fingerprint, you need the PIN to unlock. Or if you reboot. PIN trumps reader every time

The only way it's "safer" is that it encourages you to use a PIN where you might not have used one before because it's less annoying to unlock.

Another big advantage: Since you don't have to enter it as often, you can use a password rather than a pin. I exchanged my 4 digit pin code for an alphanumeric password of length 9 after I got a 5s. Thus, it has increased safety for my phone.

Comment: Re:Not going to happen (Score 1) 222

by teg (#46302207) Attached to: Sony's Favorite Gadget Is Kinect

Microsoft is going to hold on to that thing for as long as they can. It's not going away for several different reasons.

The first and largest is that the Kinect is a product differentiater. It makes the XBone different from the PS4.

Indeed. The "price of Kinect" now is probably around 200$. Without the Kinect, the consoles are very similar - except for the XBox One being slower. Thus, if there was no Kinect they'd have to set the price be quite a bit lower than the PS4.

Comment: Re:How is Norway going to know? (Score 1) 245

by teg (#45702501) Attached to: Norway Rejects Bitcoin As Currency; Taxes As Asset, Instead

The car must be registered and insured.

I'm actually starting to like the USA again...

Cars are registered and insured in the US at the state level, the federal government isn't party to it. Frankly, even at the state level, insurance is not filed with the state unless you have prior convictions of lacking required insurance (then you have to file a SR-22, at least in Texas).

My auto insurance is between me and my insurance company, I have a card to show a police officer if pulled over that I carry at least the minimum required coverage, but the government doesn't know how much, only that I have "enough".

As for a "wealth tax", are you serious? Blah... if it is taxed when I earn it, then you can't have another go at it, that is the whole idea of no double taxation. We fought a war of independence to rid ourselves of such nonsense. Of course, we have the death tax, which is clearly unconstitutional, but seems to be ignored anyway, so perhaps I shouldn't talk. Stupid government not following its own rules.

As far as insurance goes - you only need to have liability insurance. If you want to insure your car for theft and damages, that's voluntary - but being able to pay for damages caused by you isn't. And as Norway is a rather small country, rather than a federation of states, expect it to have information and powers that you'd usually think would would be separated by "federal" and "state". You get a sticker every year showing that the yearly road fee is paid, and that liability insurance is OK.

Wealth tax has some bad side effects - like most taxes - and fortunately, the new government is working towards removing it. However, the Norwegian tax system is in general more sane than the US system - lower rates and less loop holes - so it isn't all bad. And more importantly, Norway has a healthy budget surplus - the key to any sane tax cut.

Comment: Re:How is Norway going to know? (Score 1) 245

by teg (#45702255) Attached to: Norway Rejects Bitcoin As Currency; Taxes As Asset, Instead

When the time comes that you can easily buy a Ferrari for bitcoins they will also have a chance of noticing, and will ask you how you could afford that Ferrari.

How or why would they ever know I bought a Ferrari? Are such purchases reportable in Norway? (they aren't in the US)

The car must be registered and insured. Also, Norway has a wealth tax and you'd have to list it there. Of course, you could try to find a way around all of these but the harder you try, the more likely they'd get for money laundering etc. instead if they actually caught you.

Comment: Re:Local file (Score 1) 135

by teg (#45688483) Attached to: Safari Stores Previous Browsing Session Data Unencrypted

If you include the encryption key with the backup, it doesnt matter either way. If you dont, its not a terribly useful backup.

Apple's Time Machine can use full disk encryption. You need a password/passphrase to be able to read from the disk later, which is rather useful. If someone steals my iMac and my onsite backup, they can not access any data - the system, as well as the backup, are both encrypted.

Programmers do it bit by bit.

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