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Comment: Re:Simple (Score 1) 380

by tee-rav (#36668280) Attached to: How America Can Get Its Tech Mojo Back
Xenophobic gits don't complain that immigration is being obstructed. A complaint against the King of England, from the Declaration of Independence: 'He has endeavored to prevent the population of these states; for that purpose obstructing the laws for naturalization of foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither...' Jefferson wasn't perfect, but his litany of complaints against the King of England contains several gems.

Comment: Mix-a-lot (Score 1) 138

by tee-rav (#35912084) Attached to: Wardrivers Target Seattle Businesses
My money's on the Mix-a-Lot Posse.
Benzo? check.
Tinted windows? check.
One member of the gang, Larry, an allegedly-funny 'white guy' and 'real estate investor' has struggled in recent years to make payments on his many properties.
I predict the Benzo is an SEL, a 190 or an SEC, and that a search of the Benzo will reveal traces of buttermilk biscuits.

Comment: Re:Herbert Simon (Score 2, Interesting) 144

by tee-rav (#33247186) Attached to: Having Too Much Information Can Narrow Your Focus
The price to keep a person on task is high; the price to distract one is relatively low.

We are selling our attention whenever we're on the clock.

When we're recreating, it's different: Capitalists, having made a big enough bunch of us look at some shiny content they own, then sell other Capitalists the right to divert our attention with their ads.

Good, well-placed ads distract people and keep them on task long enough to spend their money.

Comment: Re:Who cares?? Well, I care! (Score 1) 560

by tee-rav (#32975460) Attached to: BP Caught Photoshopping Disaster Response Photos

Corexit's old tag line:"Got a slick? Can't correct it? Corexit!"

New tag lines:

"It's Photoshop for oil slicks."

"Photoshop. With neurotoxins!"

"It's like Photoshop, for the real world, on steroids."*

*if steroids caused internal bleeding, cancer, brain damage, and kidney failure.

BP has done a lot of things for aesthetic reasons, and not all of them are as inconsequential as doctoring photos.

Comment: Re:Dioxin is well-studied (Score 1) 343

by tee-rav (#32895114) Attached to: Infants Ingest 77 Times the Safe Level of Dioxin
Parent should read: The potential effects of accumulated dioxin are well established. The finding that infants and adults regularly consume more than the EPA limit suggests that reviews of the limit and the enforcement of environmental regulations are in order. Myriad unstudied, undocumented, widely-disseminated, and widely-used anthropogenic chemicals also demand scrutiny -- BEFORE they become widespread in the environment. Presently, industrial regulation follows the Pandora model: open the box and see what happens. Precaution is a severely underrepresented entity at the EPA (though curiously the DEA and FDA get plenty, within their respective scopes). There. Fixed that for me.

Comment: Dioxin is well-studied (Score 1) 343

by tee-rav (#32895092) Attached to: Infants Ingest 77 Times the Safe Level of Dioxin
The potential effects of accumulated dioxin are well established. The finding that infants and adults regularly consume more than the EPA limit suggests that reviews of the limit and the enforcement of environmental regulations are in order. The myriad unstudied, undocumented, widely-disseminated, and widely-used chemicals in the environment also demand scrutiny -- BEFORE they become widespread. Presently, industrial regulation follows the Pandora model: open the box and see what happens. Precaution is a severely underrepresented entity at the EPA (though curiously the DEA and FDA get plenty, within their respective scopes).

Comment: EM pollution (Score 2, Interesting) 238

by tee-rav (#32850870) Attached to: Some Birds Can See Magnetic Fields
If the temporal resolution of the cytochrome signal matches that of "normal" vision, birds with this ability can likely see individual oscillations of EM fields up to ~50Hz. What do faster-oscillating fields look like to such a bird? Do they interfere with the bird's normal vision? Strobe lights come to mind as an analogue.

Comment: Re:Disruption is essential (Score 1) 502

by tee-rav (#30623572) Attached to: Did the US Take the Back Seat In Science In 2009?
And the US government fears disruption -- of its banking system, of its auto industry, of its insurance "system" -- so much that it uses public resources for disruption prevention. Investors in good ideas, new ideas, and strong management are punished when government sponsors and rewards failed ideas, old ideas, and poor management. The government will continue to sponsor old ideas as long as the public doesn't fuss too much about it.

Comment: Patent them please! (Score 1) 52

by tee-rav (#30468566) Attached to: 94 New Species Described By CA Academy of Sciences
Hey CA Academy of Sciences, Please patent the species (including all genetic code) you discovered/described, and grant free use under open license. "Biologists" and "geneticists" discover lots of things, of which many of the useful ones end up being owned by "Big Pharma" or "Agribusiness." As an experiment (or a friendly competition), see what the "Open-source community" does with the 93 still-extant species you discovered last year.

Comment: Third party computer (Score 1) 533

by tee-rav (#30425400) Attached to: How Do I Keep My Privacy While Using Google?
Don't keep a Google account. Use Google on a public computer at the library. While there, read their newspapers and other periodicals to keep current. Don't get a library card; don't check anything out. Wear gloves and a disguise if you really don't want to be ID'ed, or street clothes if you don't want to be noticed.

Comment: Re:Biofuels are the future. (Score 1) 139

by tee-rav (#30386816) Attached to: Self-Destructing Bacteria Create Better Biofuels

And atmospheric carbon fixation is something of a moot point when we have hundreds of years of reserves of carbon that we are already digging up out of the ground and expelling into the atmosphere as highly concentrated CO2. They will even pay you to take it.

Parent gets to the point. The advantages of plants are: plants provide a service that "They will even pay you" for: pulling waste CO2 out of the atmosphere; plants store solar energy; plants manufacture themselves*; waste oxygen from plants is an essential ingredient to animal life.

Disadvantages: plants are flammable when dry, some have potential to maim when knocked over, some taste icky, the larger ones can be navigation hazards, and many harbor undesirable organisms*.

*Some plants are specially engineered not to harbor undesirable organisms. However, these plants are also usually rendered unable to manufacture themselves.

Comment: Data-consumption-hours intensity of GDP? (Score 1) 245

by tee-rav (#30379658) Attached to: Each American Consumed 34 Gigabytes Per Day In '08
Let's use these numbers constructively: 1.3 trillion hours consuming data, $14 trillion GDP. America produced $10.76/hour of data consumption by Americans. If we slow our connections down by 50%, we halve content, double the hours of data consumption, and thereby double GDP overnight, without mandating the consumption of one bit of additional data! Clearly a win-win.

Comment: Re:What? (Score 1) 290

by tee-rav (#30245936) Attached to: Newspapers Face the Prisoner's Dilemma With Google

In about 80 years, just about anyone who likes *anything* now will be dead.

A more important problem for newspapers is that their readers do not fit well with most advertisers' target demographic. People beyond a "certain age," have declining disposable incomes, but even before that their purchasing preferences have ossified to the point where advertising doesn't sway their spending habits. Coupled, these two phenomena suggest that newspapers will increasingly become vehicles for medical coupon distribution. Live readers are nice, but if their purchases are few and their habits are stable, advertisers aren't going to spend money to reach them.

Comment: Not a museum... (Score 1) 435

by tee-rav (#29045503) Attached to: Science, Technology, Natural History Museums?
but the tour of the generator room at the Hoover Dam is impressive. And road-tripping there gives many opportunities for further fun. Also: tour of the Trinity Site, outside Alamogordo, NM (check schedule); Museum of Science, Boston -- I still love the van de Graaff generator (if you go, the MIT Museum and the Harvard Museum of Natural History are worth visits as well); tour of the VLA, "near" Socorro, NM; California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco.

The absent ones are always at fault.

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