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Comment: lets do the math (Score 1) 56

by technosaurus (#49334295) Attached to: Stanford Breakthrough Could Make Better Chips Cheaper
Pi * r^2 gives us 3.14 * (8in/2)^2 yields 50 square inches. Assuming each chip is 1 square inch that gives us $5000/50 or $100 of savings per chip, since the wafer can be reused.

Now we need to make a few more assumptions for the rest. Assuming ~50% circuit density and similar cost, the remaining substrate would cost around $50. That's pretty significant, especially considering that many chips will be significantly smaller than a square inch.
What is also significant is the additional weight savings.

Comment: Then build static right (Score 1) 324

by technosaurus (#48811041) Attached to: How To Hijack Your Own Windows System With Bundled Downloads
If you use libraries designed with static linking in mind like musl-libc and tinyxlib, then it's not really that much. You get similar benefits to shared libraries if the program is or has recently been running... Users run programs, not libraries and shouldn't have to wait for every unused function of every dependent library to load just to run a program. What's worse is when vendors distribute alternate shared libraries with a single program so that none of the library caching occurs from other programs and the overall size increases significantly. If you are distributing multiple programs that use the same libraries, you can always create a multicall binary like busybox, toybox, dropbear and mupdf do and still do a static build that will be smaller than the overall shared build.

Comment: Re:Any actual examples? (Score 1) 598

by technosaurus (#48738599) Attached to: Tumblr Co-Founder: Apple's Software Is In a Nosedive
The simple act of text input in IOS

Problem 1
1. type something not in the dictionary and hit space
2. ... IOS miscorrects ... fine I'll just backspace and select my actual input. 3. I select my actual input
4. IOS doesn't replace it with the original that was just selected, but the same crap it just did
(not a problem in Android)

Problem 2

1. I don't notice this till later, because I expect sane behavior
2. Fine only the 1st letter is wrong, I'll just put my cursor after it, backspace and correct.
3. Cursor goes before or after the word or the whole word is selected
4. Have to delete the whole word and retype it
5. Be careful not to let it autocorrect or rinse and repeat
(Android puts the cursor where you tell it ... maybe off a letter or so with fat fingers)

Problem 3
You have to basically learn morse code to be effective.
Seriously the single physical button is a hindrance to adding usability features like convenient back, settings, home....
I don't want to navigate through 6+ different screens to change the settings in the app I am currently using
When an app opens another app and I want to get back to the original, IOS is useless and you have to manually navigate back.
This all techically _works_, and users only have to learn 1 (shitty) way of doing things

If you want a phone that _just_ works get an Apple.
If you want stuff to work effectively and efficiently, get an Android

Comment: Why not make 5 1/4" hard drives again? (Score 1) 219

by technosaurus (#48591477) Attached to: Seagate Bulks Up With New 8 Terabyte 'Archive' Hard Drive
I bought a Quantum Bigfoot back in the day just because I happened to have more 5.25" bays open. It did help that it was cheaper than the similar capacity 3.5" drives available at the time, but I still see new computers with multiple 5.25" bays.
If they put the same technology into a larger form factor, it wouldn't be long before the petabyte is reached.

(doesn't peta stand for the People for the Eating of Tasty Animals or something?)

Comment: Violates Interstate Commerce Clause (Score 2) 137

by technosaurus (#48545141) Attached to: Tesla Wants Texas Auto Sales Regulations Loosened
The Constitution reserves to Congress the power “to regulate Commerce [...] among the several States.” Art. 1 Sec. 8 Para 3. SCOTUS interpretation: * includes the power to preempt state law (express or implied) by the enactment of federal law * denies states power to unjustifiably discriminate against or burden the interstate flow of articles of commerce even if Congress has not enacted a preemptive federal law.

What good is a ticket to the good life, if you can't find the entrance?

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