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Comment: Re:Option? (Score 1) 340

by takev (#35160198) Attached to: Microsoft Kills AutoRun In Windows

The installer is a fixed signed application I believe. You cannot make your own installer and allow it to execute automatically.
I am not sure if the installer is actually on the disk image, I think they are .pkg files.

If there are application bundles in the disk image, they will be executable, but you will get a warning that you are trying to execute an application which you have just downloaded from a website (it shows the website).

Comment: Re:ISP (Score 1) 551

by takev (#35110064) Attached to: If You Think You Can Ignore IPv6, Think Again

ULAs are routable, just not globally. ULAs are supposed to be globally unique though, so when your company mergers with an other you can just link the two networks together without renumbering.

Right now when companies merge they both will (with high probability) have used the same range of 10.0.0.0 addresses, so one of the companies will need to renumber.

Also although in IPv4 multiple ip address assignments is an administrative nightmare, with IPv6 it will not be as most of it will be handled automatically by hosts. You will only need to configure the routers to advertise the prefix of the global routable networks.

Comment: Re:Why would you want to do those broken things? (Score 1) 551

by takev (#35110008) Attached to: If You Think You Can Ignore IPv6, Think Again

The reason FTP adds the ip-address and port number in the payload of a packet is to allow server to server data transfers. You can take an ftp client and connect to two servers at once, then tell one server to listen for a data connection from the other server, then let the other server send the data to the first.

If those servers are going to be NATed this is going to be hard, in fact these days it just will not work anymore as all the NAT devices expect the client to also be the receiver/sender of the data. Or the NAT may not see the control connection of the client at all.

There are so many things broken with NAT you wont belief it, but because you've never used such features you cannot think they could exists, nor could you see the use of it, so you want NAT.

Comment: Re:Can someone explain IPv6 without NAT? (Score 1) 551

by takev (#35108340) Attached to: If You Think You Can Ignore IPv6, Think Again

IPv6 is designed to assign multiple addresses to your network interface.

By default an interface is assigned a link local address, that can only be used inside the broadcast domain of your network. So all the host/routers connected to the same switch can talk to each other, without being configured to work on the internet.

When you connect a router to an ISP it will receive a network address which it will advertise to all the hosts in the network. The hosts in the network can use the advertised network address and auto configure a second address on their network interfaces. You can also manually configure, and also make manual subnets by configuring the router.

When you connect a router (may be the same router) to a second ISP, then the router advertises and other network number, and all the host on the network will add this to their interface as well. With some stacks you can configure policies for costs and quality to use one ISP over an other, of course this requires a bit more work by the network administrator. Multihoming with IPv4 was a lot more difficult.

You can also make your routers advertise Unique Local Addresses, basically a private range, then you can have a stable numbering within your organization. From what I understand from the wiki article, the unique local addresses are hopefully still be globally unique so you can route between two ULA networks for example when two companies merge (which is an extreme hell now with IPv4 where every company has chosen the exact same range of 10.0.0.0 addresses)
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unique_Local_Address

I am not sure if using ULA inside your network, to make internal-services provider independent, is recommended.

So what I am saying is, that NAT is not necessary, because it was build in the protocol to work with private ranges and public ranges at the same time.

Comment: Re:Recovery Fairy Tales again (Score 1) 274

by takev (#34949618) Attached to: Espionage In Icelandic Parliament
Harddrives no longer have stepper motors for positioning the head, they use a voice coil and you can position the head anywhere you want. In all likelyhood the internal electronics uses PWM to drive the voice coil, I am guessing with data retrieval you can get a higher resolution PWM or use an analogue system.

Comment: Re:Sickening (Score 1) 134

by takev (#34043548) Attached to: NASA To Auction Automated Code Generation Patents
Copyright is enough to cover software from being stolen by another company.

Right now we are in de ridicules situations that a single piece of software is covered by three different property rights:
- Copyright, which covers the original source code and binary as a work of art/craft.
- Trade secret, because most software is only released in binary form.
- Patent, which oddly for software does not break the trade secret because they mostly cover ideas instead of implementation or are written in such a way that one skilled in the art can't recreate the implementation from the patent.

In other fields you have to choose one, and only one, of these rights.
- The formula for Coca Cola cannot be copyrighted, they don't want to patent it because it only last for a few years, so they have a trade secret they protect.
- The song Happy Birthday is copyrighted, there are no patents for the order of notes in the music, nor can it be a trade secret on how to sing Happy Birthday.
- The cap of a shampoo bottle, can't be copyrighted, a trade secret is useless because everyone can see it, so they opted for a patent.

Comment: Re:Full sized laptop key style (Score 1) 310

by takev (#34021702) Attached to: Ergonomic Mechanical-Switch Keyboard?
I know what you mean, I also like notebook keyboards. Somehow they never use the dome switches, and have much more of a click feel compared to normal keyboards. Although the Apple unibody notebook keyboards look odd they feel quite good for typing, and crums don't seem to get underneath the keys like they do on other notebooks.

The Apple keyboards are the same ones used on their notebooks, so you may want to check those out.
        http://www.apple.com/keyboard/

They used to also have wired keyboards, not sure if you can still buy those.

Comment: Re:What the article doesn't mention (Score 2, Insightful) 312

by takev (#33645898) Attached to: Looking Back At OS X's Origins
Their first Beta had lots of colors, their windows has a light blue pin stripe. Then the graphic artists told Apple that all their graphics became off-color, because their eyes compensated against the slight blue tint (our eyes' automatic white balance).

Ever since then each version removed more color from the themes and from their applications. Personally I think they went overboard with iTunes, but it may also be that they want everyone to adopt the gray icons in a list for other applications as well. Don't forget that Apple applications are often used by programmers as example applications on how to visually design their own. For programmers making application that are used in any way during (not just for) Image and Video editing it is wise to reduce the amount of colors in their application. Just like most applications shouldn't make any kind of sound when people want to do sound editing.

Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them. -- Bill Vaughn

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