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Comment: Re:WTF is up with open source names (Score 1) 146

by swestcott (#35528028) Attached to: Drizzle Hits General Availability

OH man GIMP we have a graphics person here and back when we had a smaller IT budget he needed photo shop but we did not have the money for it so I without thinking first said well GIMP works well and I can show you how to use it well everyone is staring at me and it all comes crashing down the graphics guy has metal braces on both legs and needs crutches to move around .... So red faced I say I did not name it that no I do not know why it is called that ...somehow we suddenly had the money to buy a copy of photo shop

Apple

+ - Mac OS X Machines Roped Into Jnanabot Network->

Submitted by Spottywot
Spottywot (1910658) writes "Security specialist Symantec has released an analysis of the cross-platform Jnanabot worm, revealing that around 16 per cent of infections are found on Mac OS X machines.



The figures, which Symantec released earlier this week, analysed the infected machines that made up the Jnanabot botnet in December 2010, and came to a somewhat surprising conclusion



While the vast majority of machines infected by the Java-based Jnanabot worm and forming the botnet were Windows-based, 16 per cent of the network was made up of machines running Apple's Mac OS X — a platform that is often claimed to be immune to malware."

Link to Original Source

+ - THE CONSTITUTIONAL ISSUES OF CLOUD COMPUTING->

Submitted by swestcott
swestcott (44407) writes "Would James Madison, for example, agree with some current interpretations of the Fourth Amendment, which hold that old-fashioned letters stored in a dresser drawer enjoy stronger legal protection against search and seizure than an e-mail stored on the Web or a private post left for a friend on Facebook?"
Link to Original Source
The Courts

Prison Bans D&D For Mimicking Gang Structure 496

Posted by kdawson
from the step-away-from-the-polyhedral-dice dept.
Trepidity writes "In a case that has been winding its way through the courts for a while now, a Wisconsin prison banned inmates from playing Dungeons & Dragons, using the justification that 'one player is denoted the Dungeon Master... [who] is tasked with giving directions to other players... [which] mimics the organization of a gang.' The prison also cited some sparse evidence that a handful of non-inmate D&D players once committed some crimes that allegedly were related to their D&D playing. On Monday the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the regulation (PDF) against challenges from inmates. The court appeared skeptical of the ban, sarcastically referring to it as the 'war on D&D,' but upheld it nonetheless as having a 'rational basis.' Law professor Ilya Somin suggests that the court may have had no choice, given how deferential rational-basis review usually is."
Microsoft

Bill Gates Remembers 1979 310

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the i-don't dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "Last week Gizmodo had a special celebration of 1979, the last year before a digital tsunami hit, that put Bill Gates in a nostalgic mood this week. Bill chimed in with his own memories of that seminal year when everything changed. 'In 1979, Microsoft had 13 employees, most of whom appear in that famous picture that provides indisputable proof that your average computer geek from the late 1970s was not exactly on the cutting edge of fashion,' wrote Gates. 'By the end of the year we'd doubled in size to 28 employees. Even though we were doing pretty well, I was still kind of terrified by the rapid pace of hiring and worried that the bottom could fall out at any time.' What made Gates feel a little more confident was that he began to sense that BASIC was on the verge of becoming the standard language for microcomputers. 'By the middle of 1979, BASIC was running on more than 200,000 Z-80 and 8080 machines and we were just releasing a new version for the 8086 16-bit microprocessor. As the numbers grew, we were starting to think beyond programming languages, too, and about the possibility of creating applications that would have real mass appeal to consumers.' Gates remembers that in 1979 there were only 100 different software products that had more than $100 M in annual sales and all of them were for mainframes. 'In April, the 8080 version of BASIC became the first software product built to run on microprocessors to win an ICP Million Dollar Award. Today, I would be surprised if the number of million-dollar applications isn't in the millions itself' writes Gates. 'More important, of course, is the fact that more than a billion people around the world use computers and digital technology as an integral part of their day-to-day lives. That's something that really started to take shape in 1979.'"
Businesses

+ - Recent Video Game survey tainted

Submitted by
swestcott
swestcott writes ""H&K survey shows 60% of respondents agree that the government should regulate the sale of video games." this little ditty was released after the The Entertainment Software Association — better known as the lobby for video game producers chose a diffrent PR group to repersent them see this short article in the Washington Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/12/10/AR2007121001676.html"

"Kill the Wabbit, Kill the Wabbit, Kill the Wabbit!" -- Looney Tunes, "What's Opera Doc?" (1957, Chuck Jones)

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