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Comment: Re:Okay, we're clear on what you're promising (Score 3, Insightful) 185

In reality, that also helps. He cannot promise a battery with infinite capacity. Cars running on gas need refueling too and sometimes, when I'm running low, I wouldn't mind knowing where the closest gas station is. Not saying Tesla and Elon Musk will solve the world's problems, but they are trying to solve one or two while still making some profit. What do companies Exxonmobil or Chevron do for us? Really? Endless wars for oil, oil spills and other environmental impacts, price fluctuations and possibly many other negative factors.

Comment: This is good (Score 3, Insightful) 44

by supertrooper (#49233135) Attached to: edX Welcomes 'The University of Microsoft' Into Its Fold
I know almost everyone here will totally dis this news and make fun of it. Whatever. I welcome free education for those who can't afford it. I was lucky enough to get university education, but not everyone is that lucky. Even if 20 people learn something from these Microsoft courses, and it helps them land better jobs, I will be happy.

Comment: For all the people not appreciating Elon Musk (Score 1) 96

by supertrooper (#48204553) Attached to: What It Took For SpaceX To Become a Serious Space Company
You say it's easy. Then why don't you go and do something with your lives? I only wish we had a few more of people like this. Yes, he is rich, and he is planning to become even richer. At the same time, he is investing HIS money into something he believes in. Only hope he starts looking into things like hyperloop, and to make that financially viable.
Bitcoin

Why Bitcoin Is Doomed To Fail, In One Economist's Eyes 537

Posted by timothy
from the wish-I-had-some-to-whine-about dept.
Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "Economist Edward Hadas writes in the NYT that developers of bitcoin are trying to show that money can be successfully privatized but money that is not issued by governments is always doomed to failure because money is inevitably a tool of the state. 'Bitcoin exemplifies some of the problems of private money,' says Hadas. 'Its value is uncertain, its legal status is unclear, and it could easily become valueless if users lose faith.' Besides, if bitcoin ever really started to take off, governments would either ban it or take over the system says Hadas. The authorities might be motivated by a genuine concern about the stability of a shadow monetary system or they might act out of self-preservation because tax evasion would be too easy in a parallel economy. 'Part of the interest in virtual currencies like bitcoin is that their anonymity can provide a convenient cloak for criminal activity. Part is technological — this is a cool idea. And part is speculative — gamblers bet that bitcoin's value will increase,' concludes Hadas. 'Truly private money is an inferior alternative to the money that comes with the backing of a political authority. After all, no bank or bitcoin-emitter can be as public-minded as a government, and no private power can raise taxes or pass laws to unwind monetary excesses.'" Could be there's something good about money that can't be manipulated by law. Some people at least think there's plenty of value in Bitcoin and similar currencies, despite the risks. And those risks at present probably aren't enough to comfort the unfortunate Welsh fellow who (HT to reader judgecorp) "has realised he threw out a hard drive containing 7500 bitcoins, worth £4 million at today's prices. It is now under four feet of garbage in a landfill site the size of a football pitch."

There are no data that cannot be plotted on a straight line if the axis are chosen correctly.

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