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Comment: Re:Can someone please... (Score 1) 172

by sulliwan (#35571238) Attached to: RSA's Servers Hacked
NP-Complete only tells you that (if P != NP) there is no general polynomial algorithm for solving your problem. However, if the best exponential algorithm is able to, on average, break your crypto in a few minutes, then it's still not a very secure crypto system, even though it is based on an NP-Complete problem. What you are looking for in cryptography, is that the fastest you can solve a certain problem is, on average, about the same as a brute-force search. This condition can be met even if it turns out that P = NP. If the best polynomial algorithm for solving your problem is only marginally faster than a brute-force search, then your crypto system can still be considered secure.

Comment: Risk management. (Score 1) 447

by sulliwan (#31381188) Attached to: Why Paying For Code Doesn't Mean You Own It
If I buy a software project from you, I need assurance that I can keep using that project and doing maintenance on it no matter what happens to you or your business. If you die tomorrow, I will need the source code and the ability to modify it as I see fit for the contract to not carry a significant business risk for me. Signing over rights (apart from authorship and other inalienable rights) to your software should be a standard part of any development contract, in case this is not done and you keep ownership, I also expect free maintenance on the code and significantly lower costs(as is common when licensing general use software, such as MS Office, etc). If this piece of software is critical for me, for example part of a contract I made with a client of mine who needs assurance that the software keeps working then it is not possible for me to allow you to keep ownership, sorry.

Comment: Re:Excellent. (Score 1) 369

by sulliwan (#30857290) Attached to: Vimeo Also Introduces HTML5 Video Player
There is a 3rd option, don't buy the license, but include a decoder such as ffmpeg anyway, just don't allow the feature on copies of Firefox used in countries which enforce software patents. Not being able to watch YouTube might just nudge the average American to at least get informed about the issue. Codec licenses make no sense, it's a license to use a mathematical equation. Licensing specific implementations is fine, there are free alternatives which don't use any of the copyrighted code available.

Comment: Re:Bullshit! (Score 1) 421

by sulliwan (#30067652) Attached to: What Computer Science Can Teach Economics
Resources don't have an intrinsic value, value is entirely subjective. Probably the best example of this is the only truly limited resource: human labor. Let's say you work for 1 hour, you gain both expertise in the field and possibly even create something to make your work in the future more efficient(if it's a tool, an algorithm or a computer program, doesn't really matter). Now the next hour of your work has a higher value than the previous hour had, since you are more effective in what you do. Is the current market system able to fairly distribute wealth which arises from creating value? Hell no. However the logical principles of a growth-based economy are sound.

Comment: Re:An unemployed LAWYER was perhaps.... (Score 1) 554

by sulliwan (#29729383) Attached to: Blogger Loses Unemployment Check Because of Ads
I keep seeing this thrown about every now and then that everyone should be able to understand the laws. This is complete nonsense. Most people can't even understand their dishwasher manual which is a much simpler machine than that which is governed by the laws. Additionally, natural language has a really low information density and is rather ambiguous, neither are qualities you would want for describing laws. This is the reason legalese exists for in the first place, it's not just lawyer job security. You wouldn't want computer programs written in natural language, would you? You also wouldn't expect everyone to understand the programs.

Comment: Re:Refocus malware views (Score 1) 178

by sulliwan (#29598455) Attached to: Auto-Detecting Malware? It's Possible
Credit card details are actually surprisingly cheap on the black market. Credit card companies are doing a pretty good job at fraud detection and transaction authentication considering how insecure the cards by themselves are. Both your identity information and your World of Warcraft account are probably worth more than your credit card details.

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