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Comment: Re:OpenBSD (Score 1) 95 95

LibreSSL seems to have been immune to somewhere between half and two thirds of OpenSSL vulnerabilities recently. Not perfect, but a significant improvement.

Early on this was mostly due to the amount of outdated crap they deleted (less attack surface area), but as time goes on more and more will hopefully be due to improving the code that was left behind.

There's still a long way to go though.

Comment: Re:Meh (Score 1) 830 830

In most textbooks, the units are metric. This has been the same since I was in school in the 70's. It's just real life that is SI, and for some reason, real life seems to stick better.
Still, there are plenty of things that are in metric units. Engine sizes and soda bottles (but not cans) being the examples that immediately spring to mind.
Oddly enough, most American cars have nuts and bolts that are metric because we want to seem cool and hip, but most Japanese cars (manufactured for the USA) have SI nuts and bolts because they are pandering to Americans.

Are you talking about a different 'SI' that I'm not aware of? Unless someone is being overly pedantic, for day to day usage SI and metric are effectively the same thing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M...

quote:

Although a number of variants of the metric system emerged in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the term is now often used as a synonym for "SI" or the "International System of Units"

Comment: Re:Texting Maths (Score 2) 387 387

I disagree. Learning supposedly useless subjects like maths and art etc seem to help in wiring up neurons in your teenage brain to be able to unconsciously think or see better than otherwise.

It isn't the specific details of the math subject matter that is the benefit - that stuff is forgotten. I don't directly use any math techniques in my day to day life, but I can appreciate how a few years of learning it and practising solving problems in things like geometry, trig and calculus has given me a really intuitive feel for quantities, spaces and their changing relationships etc that I wouldn't have had without it.

Long term, learning is less about retaining specifics and more about training your brain to be able to learn stuff. Different subjects can exercise different pathways and it's all potentially valuable.

Your conscious mind may have forgotten all the specifics, but your unconscious mind has been improved by that practice and given your intuition a better starting point when solving new problems. And you may not really be aware of it.

No learning is completely useless. Although some teaching can be completely useless.

Comment: Re:Texting Maths (Score 1) 387 387

Most of the art classes I've taken in school really didn't allow any free expression. Most of there were something along the lines of create a copy of what the teacher does.

I had the opposite experience. Our art teacher mostly left us to it. He'd often turn up late hungover or stoned and just sit in the corner with his sunglasses on. Other times he'd do his own paid portrait work in class while he left us to it. He was (still is) a nationally recognised artist.

It was fun though :)

Comment: Re:Ungreatful Cunt (Score 1) 214 214

Think about that for a moment, folks. That's a QUARTER of a fucking CENTURY. Many Slashdotters weren't even born then, and for most of the rest, it's still been more than half of their lifetime.

What? Are you telling me there are Slashdotters under 40? Wow!

Seeing as though there's nobody on the lawn, I thought all the youngsters were all off twitting their instachats or something.

The UNIX philosophy basically involves giving you enough rope to hang yourself. And then a couple of feet more, just to be sure.

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