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Comment: Re:Classic example is the map DVD thingie (Score 1) 445

by steelshadow (#42130523) Attached to: The Coming Wave of In-Dash Auto System Obsolescence

My Prius model year 2006 came in with the maps stored in a DVD that was updated in Feb 2005. Car is still going strong, giving me 45 mpg in summer and about 40 mpg in winter. No problems, no issues. Except for that stupid map-DVD. Toyota thinks the updated DVD is worth 200$. And furthermore, only an authorized dealer technician can do this impossibly difficult task of ejecting old dvd and inserting the new one, labor at 80$ an hour. And the local dealer charges 20$ a day "storage fee" if you don't pick the car up when they call you to say it is done. It is a rip off. No one in right mind is paying for this stuff.

A few years ago I updated the map DVD in my sister's 2006 Prius. The DVD came with instructions and it was easy to do. The dealership sold me the DVD and did not try to insist that only an authorized technician could do the job.

Comment: Re:Rights with Responsibility (Score 1) 319

Therefore, the issue isn't whether schools have a right to police students' activities outside of school; but rather if actions taken in the world of cyberspace can or should be held to the same standards as those taken in print or public discourse.

Maybe you read a different article than I did, but the whole point is not whether they did something wrong but rather can the school suspend them for actions taken outside the school. It's long been settled that actions taken in cyberspace can have the same consequences as outside of it. The important issue here is how much power do schools have? I hope they do get smacked down and limited to actions taken on school and at school functions. The principals should have addressed this matter in civil court where they would likely easily win.

Comment: Re:Accusations of pedophilia?!?! (Score 2, Insightful) 319

Tell that to the group of bad parents that expect you to basically raise their children. It's not unheard of for schools to have to provide not only education, but meals, social training, and deal with behavioral issues.

If the teachers can't tell that to the parents then they are not doing THEIR job. Schools providing meals, social training, etc., are things that are happening inside the school. What is happening outside of the school is outside the authority of the school.

Comment: Re:Put the damn thing in neutral! (Score 2, Informative) 1146

by steelshadow (#29979862) Attached to: Toyotas Suddenly Accelerate; Owners Up In Arms
He probably did not have time to discover it was the floor mat causing the problem. That's something I never would have thought of in an emergency. As for turning off the ignition: (LA Times article):

One obvious line of defense is to simply shut off the engine, a step that may not be intuitive on the ES 350. The car has a push-button start system, activated by the combination of a wireless electronic fob carried by the driver and a button on the dashboard.

But once the vehicle is moving, the engine will not shut off unless the button is held down for a full three seconds -- a period of time in which Saylor's car would have traveled 528 feet. A driver may push the button repeatedly, not knowing it requires a three-second hold.

...

The other common defense tactic advised by experts is to simply shift a runaway vehicle into neutral. But the ES 350 is equipped with an automatic transmission that can mimic manual shifting, and its shift lever on the console has a series of gates and detents that allow a driver to select any of at least four forward gears.

Comment: Re:Put the damn thing in neutral! (Score 1) 1146

by steelshadow (#29979806) Attached to: Toyotas Suddenly Accelerate; Owners Up In Arms
From the LA Times article:

One obvious line of defense is to simply shut off the engine, a step that may not be intuitive on the ES 350. The car has a push-button start system, activated by the combination of a wireless electronic fob carried by the driver and a button on the dashboard.

But once the vehicle is moving, the engine will not shut off unless the button is held down for a full three seconds -- a period of time in which Saylor's car would have traveled 528 feet. A driver may push the button repeatedly, not knowing it requires a three-second hold.

Comment: Re:My sudden-acceleration Audi experience (Score 1) 1146

by steelshadow (#29979686) Attached to: Toyotas Suddenly Accelerate; Owners Up In Arms
From an LA Times article:

One obvious line of defense is to simply shut off the engine, a step that may not be intuitive on the ES 350. The car has a push-button start system, activated by the combination of a wireless electronic fob carried by the driver and a button on the dashboard.

But once the vehicle is moving, the engine will not shut off unless the button is held down for a full three seconds -- a period of time in which Saylor's car would have traveled 528 feet. A driver may push the button repeatedly, not knowing it requires a three-second hold.

"When you are dealing with an emergency, you can't wait three seconds for the car to respond at 120 miles an hour," said Clarence Ditlow, executive director of the nonprofit Center for Auto Safety.

The ES 350 Saylor was driving that day was a loaner provided to him by Bob Baker Lexus when he took his family's Lexus in for servicing. It's unclear whether Saylor's own car had the same feature or whether he was aware of the shutdown procedure. Bob Baker Lexus did not return calls.

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