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Comment: Re:Shocking (Score 1) 578

by srleffler (#32889680) Attached to: Claimed Proof That UNIX Code Was Copied Into Linux
Their case stayed in court because they delayed introducing the evidence for as long as possible. They foot-dragged for years before submitting their list of infringing code. Once it was finally submitted, the Court pared the list down to just a few hundred lines of possibly-infringing code. The court never ruled on whether any of that code actually infringed, because SCO declared bankruptcy and got the case stayed.

Comment: Re:for those wondering when (Score 3, Informative) 336

by srleffler (#32768014) Attached to: HDBaseT Supporters Hope To Kiss HDMI Goodbye
Actually the cellphone makers agreed to standardize their power connectors a few months ago, at least in Europe. All smartphones will have a common power connector, and you'll be able to use any power supply. Eventually, phones won't come with a power supply, you'll just keep using the old one. I believe the new standard is one of the small USB connectors.

Comment: Re:They probably shouldn't be treated as Id. eithe (Score 1) 355

by srleffler (#32420864) Attached to: Thumbprints Used To Check Books Out of School Library

... ultimately, no system can guarantee that the actual finger or eye or DNA was scanned - all that the 'server' can verify is that the correct 'data' corresponding to previously recorded data, was transmitted over the network to the server. So, compromise a terminal (or setup a computer which masquerades as a valid 'terminal'), then send the correct 'data' from that terminal, and the server will assume that the user's thumb or retina was scanned.

A properly-designed system would have the data sent by the terminal encrypted, so to compromise the system the hacker needs not only the geometric information on your finger or retina, but also the terminal manufacturer's private encryption key.

Comment: Re:Big Deal (Score 1) 355

by srleffler (#32420694) Attached to: Thumbprints Used To Check Books Out of School Library
Computerizing sign-out of books does make some sense. Once the system is set up, there is much less labor involved in tracking which books are out and when they are due back. The switch to this system may allow the library to be managed by a staff member part-time, rather than a full-time librarian.

It's not clear that the biometric ID is better than using a library card with a barcode, but perhaps the biometric system is cheaper since you don't have to print and issue library cards and deal with lost cards, etc.

Comment: Re:They are waiting for copyright to expire in 2 (Score 1) 142

by srleffler (#32393886) Attached to: <em>The Hobbit</em> On Hold
Your information is out of date. U.S. copyright terms were extended by the Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998. Assuming the copyright was renewed by 1965, its term was extended for 95 years from the date of publication, so the copyright will expire around 2032.

Not only will The Hobbit's copyright not expire in 2012, but in fact with rare exceptions no copyrights will expire in that year, or in any other year until 2019. The change in copyright terms was motivated by the then-imminent expiry of the copyright on Mickey Mouse.

First Person Shooters (Games)

Dedicated Halo 2 Fans Keep Multiplayer Alive 239

Posted by Soulskill
from the never-surrender dept.
On April 15th, Microsoft terminated Xbox Live support for the original Xbox console, marking the end of online multiplayer for many older games. However, a group of Halo 2 players have refused to give up online play by leaving their consoles on and connected since then. Overheating consoles and dropped connections have taken their toll, but at present, 13 players are still going strong.

Lisp Users: Due to the holiday next Monday, there will be no garbage collection.

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