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Comment: Re:Plant? (Score 1) 367

by sribe (#49754707) Attached to: How Java Changed Programming Forever

That's going a bit far. Javascript definitely has some kludge...

Oh, I agree. Some last-second editing rephrased "at all compared to" and made it read a bit differently than I intended. JavaScript is kludgy; but it's nothing compared to the ass-backware inside-out semantic model that Node.js advocates promote ;-)

All you kiddies who discovered event-driven programming and the C10K problem last month, shut up. The real adults have solved the C2M problem, and the solution involves threads AND event-driven queues, a technique which has been well understood for about 20 freaking years now.

Comment: Re:Irresponsible. (Score 1) 120

The Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey crashed 4 times during testing killing 30 crew members.

You got me; I'd totally forgotten about the V-22 Albatross ;-)

All modern planes except light GA aircraft have engines have fully computer-controlled engines, it's called FADEC...

Of course they are. I wasn't taking a cheap shot a software-controlled planes in general, I was taking a cheap shot at French software engineering--sorry I wasn't more clear about that...

Comment: Re:Irresponsible. (Score -1) 120

They WERE testing the plane. cant know about the bugs until the real world tests

And yet, somehow, in modern times, it's only Airbus whose planes crash during testing and kill crews. But I guess since we don't have a statistically meaningful sample size of computer-controlled jets doing that, it's just coincidence that they're both Airbus, right? Just pure dumb luck...

Comment: Re:What? (Score 1) 126

by sribe (#49702713) Attached to: How SpaceX and the Quest For Mars Almost Sunk Tesla Motors

Once again, state labor laws have absolutely nothing, nada, zip, zilch to do with a bankruptcy proceeding. Repeating it over and over will not make it true, no matter how often you try.

Once again, principals' legal liability for wage theft HAS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING TO DO WITH BANKRUPTCY LAW. Bankruptcy for the CORPORATION deals with the disposition of the CORPORATION'S assets. It has nothing at all to do with personal assets, and how those personal assets might be attached in a suit for FRAUD.

Comment: Re:Personal guarantee of company debts (Score 1) 126

by sribe (#49702693) Attached to: How SpaceX and the Quest For Mars Almost Sunk Tesla Motors

Look, at least one other person here has pointed out that your claims are incorrect, using pretty much the same argument that I have. Apparently you are one of those unfortunates who is incapable of admitting when you are wrong. Good luck to you, sir. You're going to need it.

My understanding came directly from a corporate attorney who was asked the exact question. Yours and his came from reading and interpreting the wrong law.

Comment: Re:Claims for wages not protected under FLSA (Score 1) 126

by sribe (#49701423) Attached to: How SpaceX and the Quest For Mars Almost Sunk Tesla Motors

That is only true if the company is a sole proprietorship or partnership structure where there is no corporate veil. Claims for wages due to insolvency do not fall under the Fair Labor Standards Act [shrm.org] unless the principle willfully filed for bankruptcy in an attempt to avoid paying wages. Employees are considered creditors during a bankruptcy and may be paid according to their priority as a creditor but generally they will have no claim on the personal assets of the shareholders unless there was a personal guarantee of some sort or malfeasance

Again, that is only FEDERAL law. Laws pertaining to "wage theft" vary from state to state.

And, by the way, how is allowing employees to come to work after you run out of money, but not telling them until payday, not malfeasance???

Comment: Re:Personal guarantee of company debts (Score 1) 126

by sribe (#49701401) Attached to: How SpaceX and the Quest For Mars Almost Sunk Tesla Motors

The #1 reason businesses incorporate is to protect the owner(s) from the liabilities of the corporate entity - that's ALL liabilities, including unpaid wages.

Only under certain circumstances. There are MANY circumstances under which the corporate veil does not protect the owners, and wage theft can be exactly such a circumstance--indeed ANY kind of fraud.

Comment: Re:What? (Score 1) 126

by sribe (#49701337) Attached to: How SpaceX and the Quest For Mars Almost Sunk Tesla Motors

Wow. I guess you figured the hole you're in wasn't deep enough, so you decided to keep digging.

Right back at you ;-)

FYI, there is no such thing as a state bankruptcy court, and state labor laws play no part in a bankruptcy proceeding. ALL bankruptcies in the US take place in a federal court, and are governed by federal law: [wikipedia.org]

Absolutely true. And completely irrelevant. The bankruptcy proceeding is about the disposition of the corporation's assets, and has absolutely no protections for personal liabilities under state labor laws or anti-fraud statutes.

Comment: Re:What? (Score 1) 126

by sribe (#49698819) Attached to: How SpaceX and the Quest For Mars Almost Sunk Tesla Motors

You have no idea what you're talking about.

Uhm, yes, actually I do.

In no case (in the US) are owners personally liable for unpaid wages or any other unpaid creditor.

The article you link to is about FEDERAL bankruptcy law and the FEDERAL Department of Labor. It says absolutely nothing about state laws nor state departments of labor.

Comment: Re:What? (Score 1) 126

by sribe (#49698121) Attached to: How SpaceX and the Quest For Mars Almost Sunk Tesla Motors

Companies must have the ability to meet their liabilities as they become due otherwise they are trading insolvent. Put simply if Tesla had reached pay day and been unable to make the payment then it would have been insolvent and it would have been illegal for them to continue trading.

True. Being publicly-traded brings that regulatory aspect into it. Of course, halting trading doesn't get employees paid, but it does at least let them know what's coming :-(

Also, I think unpaid wages are a priority claim against assets, so in a bankruptcy reorganization or liquidation, employees would have priority over other creditors, and investors are further back.

Logic is a pretty flower that smells bad.

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