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Comment: Re:I had the same problem (Score 1) 179

by sremick (#49451337) Attached to: Google Lollipop Bricking Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 Devices

I replaced my Nexus 5 with a Samsung Galaxy S5 -- I really like the S5 (and removable SIM), but I hate Samsung's Touchwiz interface.

Which is one of the reasons I bought a T-Mobile S5 even though I'm on AT&T. Unlocked it, rooted it, installed Lollipop months before AT&T or T-Mobile released it. Been happy ever since.

I only had to suffer through Touchwiz and bloatware for a few days.

Comment: Samsung has lost its way (Score 2) 235

by sremick (#49162085) Attached to: Samsung Officially Unpacks Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge At MWC

No MicroSD slot and no removable battery means no sale for me. And from the posts on this forum, I'm far from alone.

When my S2 died a couple weeks ago I had already read the rumors that the S6 would lack these critical, basic features. So I went ahead and bought an S5. So glad I didn't wait for the anti-consumer S6.

Removable batteries are both about getting through a full day of hardcore usage without ever being tethered to a charging wire, as well as increasing the overal longevity of the phone by being able to replace it 2-3 years in when it no longer holds a decent charge.

Expandable storage isn't just about having more storage in the device. It's about being able to have safe storage independent of the device that can survive the device failing. Every night my phone does an automatic backup of all my apps and data to my MicroSD card. I can't tell you how many times this has saved me over the years, on multiple phones. More than once on my Samsung Captivate (original Galaxy S). More than once on my S2... including this most-recent time 2 weeks ago. I moved my MicroSD card over to my new S5, restored my data and I was right back where I left off.

And don't give me that crap about backing up to the "cloud". The "cloud" is a joke, and those of us in the Real World don't have data, let alone wifi access 24/7. Just because I don't have wireless signal doesn't mean I don't want my data backed up that night.

Every cell phone I've ever owned has had a removable battery, and every smartphone I've ever had has had a MicroSD card... including some non-smartphones from back when they were called TransFlash. There's no way in hell I'm going to start giving up these basic, core features of owning a phone. If Samsung doesn't get its head out of its ass, stop being stupid and stop being anti-consumer then the S5 could easily be the last Samsung phone I ever buy. I'll miss the OLED screen but they won't deserve my money at that point. I'll vote with my money and give it to a company that isn't into the business of screwing the user and forced-obsolescence.

Comment: Re:backup for 911 (Score 1) 115

by sremick (#48210339) Attached to: Software Glitch Caused 911 Outage For 11 Million People

Also, there's no reason cellular 911 service shouldn't be ultra-reliable.

http://www.mychamplainvalley.c...

What are the odds that all 4 of them will have ALL their overlapping cell towers in an area knocked-out?

What are the odds your family isn't all on a single cellular carrier, making you unable to take advantage of such redundancy?

Comment: Re:backup for 911 (Score 0) 115

by sremick (#48205237) Attached to: Software Glitch Caused 911 Outage For 11 Million People

What is this land line you speak of?

If you care enough about 911 and emergency situations to be reading this article, and you don't have a landline, then that's on you for being irresponsible. People spend more on texting than it costs to have a landline. No excuses.

The monthly cost of a landline is cheap insurance in the event of an emergency. Cell towers go down, fail, become over-congested, and cell phone batteries die.

Comment: Re:backup for 911 (Score 0) 115

by sremick (#48205145) Attached to: Software Glitch Caused 911 Outage For 11 Million People

whats a landline.

If you care enough about 911 and emergency situations to be reading this article, and you don't have a landline, then that's on you for being irresponsible. People spend more on texting than it costs to have a landline. No excuses.

The monthly cost of a landline is cheap insurance in the event of an emergency. Cell towers go down, fail, become over-congested, and cell phone batteries die.

Comment: Re:backup for 911 (Score 2) 115

by sremick (#48205139) Attached to: Software Glitch Caused 911 Outage For 11 Million People

What landline?

If you care enough about 911 and emergency situations to be reading this article, and you don't have a landline, then that's on you for being irresponsible. People spend more on texting than it costs to have a landline. No excuses.

The monthly cost of a landline is cheap insurance in the event of an emergency. Cell towers go down, fail, become over-congested, and cell phone batteries die.

Comment: Re:Is there no commandline? (Score 1) 345

by sremick (#48132383) Attached to: ChromeOS Will No Longer Support Ext2/3/4 On External Drives/SD Cards

Wake me up when there's a Nexus device with a MicroSD slot. Until then, I couldn't care less about Nexus devices as apparently they don't care about me or all the other countless users who have learned and conditioned their usage of their smartphone around what used to be a standard, logical feature.

Comment: Re:Microsoft Natural Keyboard, before they fschked (Score 1) 635

by sremick (#47858903) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Old Technology Can't You Give Up?

My old Northgate Omnikey keyboard had the keycap letterings not printed in paint, but as plastic molded throughout the entire thickness of the key. There was no possible way to wear it off. It was also full-mechanical with a metal base. Could be switched to Dvorak layout in 2 presses.

I miss that keyboard.

Comment: Re:Removable battery? (Score 1) 176

by sremick (#47236487) Attached to: Samsung Debuts Thin Galaxy Tab S With Super AMOLED 2560X1600 Display

You're joking right? Consumers are pushing a desire for thinner lighter devices capable of longer and longer run-times with higher loads.

Believe it or not, consumers also like to not have to replace their device in 2 years because the battery only holds half the capacity it used to. Just because it's not on the box or part of the advertisement's spiel doesn't mean it's not something consumers care about. There are plenty of consumers who can see into the future beyond the length of their nose.

Something has to give when you are designing around these requirements. A lot of modern devices are thin because their batteries lack any kind of protection. Using flat lithium cells gives the designer far more flexibility to design a product rather than having a full battery pack with protective case and protection circuit.

You seem to be under the misconception that these rule each other out. Do you do much electronics repair? How many devices have you owned? Opened? Replaced the batteries on? I am on a tablet right now that is thinner than a Microsoft Surface Pro 2, but unlike the Surface it has a user-removable battery and doesn't sacrifice run-time to get it. My cell phone is thinner than an iPhone... and guess what? Removable battery.

Manufacturers aren't making non-removable batteries because of design constraints. They're making them non-removable because it ensures that when the battery wears out, the consumer is forced to buy a new model. Otherwise why permanently epoxy the battery into the device? I know all about unprotected lithium cells... I'm a certified Apple technician and have opened plenty of MacBooks. But you can have a battery that uses the case of the device to protect it without gluing the damn thing in so it can't even be serviced by someone with the proper training and tools.

The average consumer is likely to damage the types of batteries used in these devices and burn their house down in the process.

I'm well aware of this... it's made quite clear in our training and quite obvious when you're working on them daily. But it's not as necessary as you've been fooled to think. The "design constraints" and "users are demanding thinner" is just the bullshit lines they've come up with as an excuse to mask the actual reason: enforced obsolescence and increased revenue stream. If it were actually true, there would be no need for the epoxy, and no other manufacturers proving them wrong.

Given the pace of technology and the average use life of such devices, replaceable battery is one feature I really no longer care about.

That's nice. Not everyone is rolling in cash and prepared to buy a new phone or tablet every 2 years, especially when there's no technical reason to have to do so. Consumers have been conditioned to accept a worn-out battery as a legitimate reason to trash their otherwise perfectly functional and adequate device, which is insane and inexcusable. This would've never been accepted pre-iPhone/iPod. My sister's HTC One X is less than 2 years old and already can't hold a charge worth a damn. The phone is already 3 times the phone she needs, so why should she be forced to buy a new one? It's criminal. Luckily I am willing to replace it for her but HTC has made it unnecessarily difficult for no legitimate reason. There are thinner phones with user-replaceable batteries... they could've made it so she could do it herself, but that wasn't advantageous to their bottom line.

And if the batteries actually fail a quick and quite cheap trip to the repair shop will see it swapped out.

WHAT "repair shop"? Maybe for the lucky subset of people who live in cities near an Apple Store or some other electronics shop. But guess what? There's a lot more to the USA and world than the big cities. And the fact remains: there's no need for it to not be replaceable by the consumer. There's no need for them to pay $80 to have someone replace a $5 battery. And there's no reason to epoxy the batteries in so the repair shop can't even replace just the battery.

It's a scam, it's bullshit, it's anti-consumer, and it should be criminal. Unfortunately they've sufficiently brainwashed you so that you're inclined to parrot their same line which helps them spread the lie and make you an unpaid salesforce on their behalf, but those of us who have opened enough off these devices, and seen enough of what is possible, know the truth. It's too bad that the technically-informed are the minority of consumers, leaving the majority to be taken advantage of by the manufacturers, but unfortunately that's been the case for years.

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