Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Rights, in Canada (Score 2) 384

by spindizzy (#38442680) Attached to: Sony Sued Over PSN 'No Suing' Provision

It's the same in Australia - case law here shows EULAs are [not] worth the paper they're [not] written on. Click through here is not a contract.

Doesn't stop both Australian and International companies pretending they are.

Or especially US companies thinking that US consumer laws with their appalling lack of protections apply here. They lose, a lot.

Comment: Re:3 was good? (Score 1) 629

by spindizzy (#30519562) Attached to: The Definitive Evisceration of <em>The Phantom Menace</em> *NSFW*
Except there is not redemption from any ethical view point I'll recognise. Saving your own son by murdering another, especially after voicing the hope that said son will join you in a crushing rulership of the galaxy does not redeem for what appears to be a responsibility for millions, if not hundreds of millions murdered at your own hand/orders. Vader got off insanely lightly and the message it sends is twisted beyond belief.
Networking

Australia To Build Fiber-To-the-Premises Network 300

Posted by kdawson
from the no-censorship-on-the-wire-of-course dept.
candiman writes "The Australian PM, Kevin Rudd, has just announced that none of the private sector submissions to build a National Broadband Network was up to the standard, so instead the government is going to form a private company to build a fiber to the premises network. The network will connect to 90% of premises delivering 100Mb/s. The remaining 10% will be reached with wireless and satellite delivering up to 12Mb/s. The network cost has been estimated at 43 billion AU dollars over 8 years of construction — and is expected to employ 47,000 people at peak. It will be wholesale only and completely open access. As an Australian who voted for the other guys, all I can say is, wow."
Communications

+ - Australian Government pushes for Fibre To The Node->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "After kicking the incumbent, previously Goverment branch, telco out of the bidding process because they didn't get their act together, the Australian government has rejected all of the bids from the exisiting commercial companies to provide a national broadband backbone and instead has decided to invest AUD$43billion in a new company to build and provide services to customers. Providing fibre to the node will pose a very real threat to the incumbent (Telstra) telco that owns all of the copper but the best is yet to come: if Telstra move to try and delay or scupper this effort, the Government is willing to fix the legislation in their favour! woooo! Now why can't Obama take a leaf out of this book and do something similar for the USA?"
Link to Original Source
The Courts

+ - I violated copyright law. Now what?

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "I am US-based and have recently been doing part-time subcontracting work for a friend in the UK who runs her own small marketing firm. She sells a complete branding/identity plan and if that includes a web site refresh, she calls me. The clients do not know who or where I am, or even that the work is being subbed. Like many designers, I often use Corbis and other photo merchants to mock up layouts for review. It is legal to download images ("comps") from Corbis to use offline for the this purpose. If the client likes the design/images, I get a quote from the photo vendor and the client has the option to purchase. If the price is too high, which it often is with Corbis, I turn to less expensive or free alternatives.

One of her clients, for whom I recently designed a site, just received a $25,000 invoice from a law firm in London representing Corbis, who claimed their content was on the client's site. The client of course was frantic when they received the bill and called my marketing friend, who called me. I investigated and sure enough, there were images on the site that were rightfully the property of Corbis, which I put there. In this instance I neglected to swap out the comps with legal images I purchased for the client from another online source before I made the site live. As a designer I respect content rights and did not, would not, maliciuosly steal images. The client and my friend had no idea.

I moved quickly to correct the situation — scrubbed the site and looked through other clients' sites to make sure nothing else had gotten through. I called Corbis and told their legal department what happened and they told me I would have to deal with the law firm, who handles "all our overseas affairs." I then sent a certified letter to the law firm telling them what happened in an attempt to exonerate the client, and by default, my friend. That was today.

I quoted the images in question on the Corbis site and the total would have been about $800. I did my due-googling and in the spectrum of copyright infringement, I want to believe I'm closer to the speeder than I am the serial-killer. Other photo houses (Getty) send out cease and desist letter and it's done. There is mention of similar situations on some forums, especially in the UK, but I can't seem to find any precedent as to what my fate might be. Does anyone have any idea? I made about $1,000 for the site about a year ago, and as much as it would pain me, would be willing to give that up to make this go away. But something tells me this is going to get ugly."
Slashdot.org

+ - How the Web Almost Never Was

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "I remember in the early 1990's when the web was being developed; Yahoo! was only 1 page, and there was believed to be only 100 web pages (not sites) in the whole world. The web had no ad banners, no PPC, and no commercial use. Domain name registration was free. Everyone believed the Internet was primarily used by college students. Some groups, like the RIAA, claimed the web & FTP sites were primarily used to transfer illegal music and therefor the world wide web should be shut down. This true story parallels the RIAA's current campaign against P2P sites, and explains why P2P technology (such as DNS) is necessary for the future of the web."
The Internet

+ - What's the Real Cost of BitTorrent vs Legit?

Submitted by
SharkeeTX
SharkeeTX writes "How much do you really save using BitTorrent for TV? How much does leaving your computer on to download cost? This study reveals the costs and savings of BitTorrent, iTunes TV, XBox Marketplace TV, and Digital Cable. When is one cheaper than another? How much TV do you watch determines the answer and guides you to a cheapest solution.

http://thehonk.net/?p=179"
Hardware Hacking

+ - Simple computation using dominos

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "When silicon fails to beat Moores law, maybe dominos can help. This guy has created a half adder in dominos as a proof of concept for domino computation. If he intends to make a full domino computer he's going to need an awful lot of dominos..."
Portables (Apple)

+ - Who's buying all the IPods

Submitted by
skeets
skeets writes "I know some people love their IPods, but it always amazes me that they sell so much better than other brands (11-12 million this quarter). Now don't get me started on Zune sales. The Zune article also sites SanDisk as No. 2, but it is still way behind Apple in market share. Will the IPhone sales be counted in IPod market share?"
Games

Rockstar to Use NaturalMotion Technology in Upcoming Games 39

Posted by Zonk
from the feeling-euphoric dept.
CVG reports that future Rockstar titles will feature NaturalMotion technologies in an effort to make the games more realistic. Specifically, Rockstar will be licensing the 'Euphoria' engine, an advanced physics and substance simulation model already in use in several upcoming LucasArts titles. There's no word in the article on which games will feature the technology, but this certainly seems like something that would fit well with the sandbox style games of the GTA series. " Employed in the recently revealed The Force Unleashed, euphoria simulates the human body and motor nervous system. It means that in-game characters are fully interactive and always react differently to external influences, ultimately leading to a more life-like experience for the player. Specific reference to how euphoria 'uses the processing power of PLAYSTATION 3 and Xbox 360' to simluate the human body and motor nervous system was made in the announcement. While Rockstar is yet to name games using euphoria, its integration of the tech is well advanced."

The person who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything.

Working...