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Submission + - Facebook Patches Critical XSS Bug That Led to Total Account Compromise (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: British security researcher Jack Whitton has identified a critical XSS vulnerability on Facebook that could be leveraged via malicious PNG images and grant an attacker access to someone's account. In an interview, the researcher said that his XSS could have been used in the same way with the Samy worm that infected 1 million MySpace users in just the first day in 2005. Facebook took the issue so seriously that it patched in in just 6 hours, unlike other companies that take 6 months to just respond to an email.

Submission + - VMWare lays off Fusion and Workstation development team (chipx86.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The entire Hosted UI team, responsible for VMware’s Workstation and Fusion products, have been laid off and the future of these products is now unclear with rumors future maintenance will be outsourced to China.

Comment Depends (Score 1) 84

This will depend heavily on which language the original and end documents are in. Or: Success relies strongly on source and target vernacular.

English has numerous words for the same thing. Try to say a guy is cute, handsome, beautiful, or hot in Portuguese and it all translates to "Bonito".

Submission + - Largest Known Prime, 49th Known Mersenne Prime Found!! (mersenne.org)

chalsall writes: GIMPS celebrated its 20th anniversary with the discovery of the largest known prime number, 2^74,207,281-1. Curtis Cooper, one of many thousands of GIMPS volunteers, used one of his university's computers to make the find. The prime number, also known as M74207281, is calculated by multiplying together 74,207,281 twos then subtracting one. It has 22,338,618 digits — almost 5 million digits longer than the previous record prime number.

Submission + - Did Apple Rip Off A Jailbreak App To Make iOS 9.3's Night Shift? (forbes.com)

JustAnotherOldGuy writes: Imagine this: You create a highly popular app that allows jailbroken iOS users to alter the lighting on their devices to potentially reduce the impact of blue light on their quality of sleep. Your app is then essentially copied by Apple, introduced as a native feature in iOS, and your requests to include the fairly basic, non-intrusive app in the official App Store are blocked by Apple itself. Seem unfair? Well, that’s pretty much what’s happened to F.lux – a very highly-regarded app that’s now only available on jailbroken devices. It was previously possible to install it using a method called side-loading without jailbreaking your device, but Apple contacted F.lux in November last year to ask it to cease and desist – quite possibly because Night Shift, a new blue light-limiting feature of the forthcoming iOS 9.3, does exactly the same thing.

Submission + - How fast do gravitational waves travel? 1

StartsWithABang writes: When Einstein’s theory was first proposed as an alternative to Newtonian gravity, there were a number of subtle but important theoretical differences noted between the two. Einstein’s theory predicted gravitational redshift, time delays, bending of light and more. But what was perhaps most remarkable is that unlike Newton’s gravity, Einstein’s general relativity predicted an entirely new phenomenon: gravitational radiation. Much like how charged particles moving in a magnetic field accelerate and emit radiation in the form of photons, masses moving in a gravitational field accelerate and emit radiation in the form of gravitational waves, or ripples in the fabric of space itself. Even though these waves move at c, the speed of light in a vacuum, the expanding Universe carries them even farther, as these ripples ride atop the fabric of our expanding spacetime.

Comment Re:Environmentally unconscious (Score 1) 197

The environmental value of your body's chemical components is totally negligible compared to what you consume over your lifetime.

This is oversimplification to the point of just plain wrong. There are chemicals in your body (and your food) that took centuries of effort and huge investments of energy for the biosphere to put together just right so you could live on them. No, I'm not talking the chemical energy in the molecular bonds, I'm referring to the long, convoluted path from inorganic raw material to useful proteins and other specialized molecules that life depends on. It is an insult to life and our planet to just burn them into constituent atoms. This composting method recycles them into the biosphere almost intact, tho they do go into simpler life forms.

I've been looking for a legal way to do this for at least 40 years. I'd prefer being fed to a few carnivores (lions would be nice) with the poop being composted, but this will do.

Comment Make the work easier, not just the code (Score 0) 197

A lot of programming work is modifying someone else's code. Proper commenting goes a long way towards making that job easier for the guy who comes after you. I certainly appreciate it when I inherit well laid out & documented in the source old stuff from folks I've never met. But it's important to go beyond just that tired old I've-heard-that-before advice.

Make your code funny. Compilers make the same binary size whether your variables are one letter or a whole sentence long. Tell jokes, rag on your boss and co-workers (nicely!), make error messages a hilarious variable with the serious message inside. The best place is when you output a message to the user and need them to hit a key before you continue. Most languages need a variable as part of the input statement, but you'll never reference that variable again. It's perfect for snide remarks that only other coders will see. My favorite tho is when I once wrote

Open(the.pod.bay.doors.Hal) else print Im.SorryDave.I.cant.do.that

with properly assigned values. It compiled & ran fine, but wow did it get a good laugh from a nearby cubicle a few months later. It livens up the workday and you'll be thanked for it.

Comment Easy to beat (Score 1) 353

End-user encryption. If I make my own, it doesn't have to be particularly good, it just needs to be custom enough that "The Man" doesn't have a script-kiddie one-size-fits-all tool belt that can crack it. My shit is private, but I'm not doing anything that would make them spend big $$$ on figuring it out. Without my password, they are SOL. Oh, gee, my memory isn't so good either. Perhaps my lawyer can help me remember it?

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