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Comment Re:they cripple OtherOS to preserve their revenues (Score 1) 292

Surprisingly, PSP still has new titles actively being released/developed for it. I don't think piracy hurts anything in the industry as much as the media likes to make it sound; if people have the money to pay for a game they enjoy, they purchase it and as far as I'm concerned that's the end of the story.

Comment Re:"Friendly AI" (Score 1) 258

Armed robots are a great idea in that they'd cost less than a fully trained human and are more easily repairable.

Wrong. Humans are a renewable resource, they are produced much more rapidly than any other single resource/machine and run off of another very easily renewable resource(plants and animals).

In addition to all of these facts, you also forget to realize that in this situation it would still take a human to control the robot and it is quite likely that the robot would be dismantled by the enemy or damaged beyond repair in most battles. You do still have the saved trainee, however I don't believe he would ever end up being worth more than the expensive machine we created for him to control.

Machines will be more efficient than humans in warfare when either humans become rarer or machines can give birth and live off natural and renewable resources. Until then, flesh and blood humans will make the cheapest and easiest soldiers.

Comment Re:Perspective (Score 1) 466

lol.. So it's okay for them to pollute all of civilization as long as it's to a small enough degree?

These small amounts of contaminants are still present and going somewhere which I would assume is into the population or anything using water.

Over time this could add up and I would suspect that even reaching 1% contamination on our water from years of pollution from these many sources would reduce public water to unusable.

However, this likely will never happen since in essence the contaminated water is being consumed and filtered by every(thing/one) on a daily basis.

I still can't help but wonder what affects these pollutants could ultimately have on all life.

Comment Re:Design (Score 1) 175

And I guess, if in 20 years it gets attacked by aliens someone will post "oh, and they should have seen this coming and added laser defenses."

I could almost agree with you if it weren't for the fact that we already had prior knowledge of the existence of dirt/dust/sand on Mars. We have no evidence suggesting that we will ever run into aliens.

Comment I recommend whatever your Brother is interested in (Score 1) 799

I am a self-taught programmer and I have been programming for over 12 years. I started my interest in programming when I was 12, but wouldn't consider myself into programming until I was 14.

When I was 12, I got a C++ programming book and went through it fairly quickly. My interest was in developing video games like Doom, Quake, etc. At the time I was young and lacked the knowledge or dedication to look into this any further and became attached to HTML/JavaScript, PHP and AS2/3 as a web developer and 2d/3d animator/modeler/artist.

Slightly off-topic bg info: I actually went to school for Media Arts and Animation(Where I flunked out with 1 class to graduate due to financial issues and turned to programming permanently) and while I did take a couple minor programming courses based on AS2, I found that I already knew more than the teachers at my school on the subject from reading through the docs when I was 15-18 and ended up serving as a tutor in the classes(as I did in virtually all classes with nearly straight A's and still unable to graduate from final class, almost laughable if it hadn't cost so much) even though I would now consider my knowledge of AS2 at the time to be infantile. I should have expected as much since the school was dedicated to art students, many of whom could barely work a computer.

Back to the subject: I think the best way to get a new person into programming would be to teach them the fundamentals of object oriented programming first and make sure that it is taught around something they are interested in. For example, if the noobie is interested in games I would suggest teaching them to program in UnrealScript - Unreal Engine 3 - UDK or XNA Game Studio 3.1. If he is into 2d graphics and animation try AS3 or Silverlight(I do not really have experience with Silverlight past a few documentation glimpses and tutorials). If he just likes dealing with data try PHP/MySQL.

The important thing here is to make sure that he grasps the techniques needed to produce reliable, extend-able, clean and well documented object-oriented code. If he's really interested in programming he's probably already good with math and will pick up on the algebraic and geometrical side of things easily in school math classes and be able to relate them to the object-oriented ideas you have already instilled in him allowing him to be able to generate code producing quick visual results with any of the previously suggested packages. All of the languages I have suggested are extremely well documented.

I hope I have been helpful.

Comment Re:It's that computer called the brain. (Score 1) 257

What we need is a smarter computer that says, "I don't know what this is supposed to be, but here's my best guess," and displays noise. Let the brain then takeover and mentally remove the noise from the audio or image.

You obviously don't understand the mechanics of computer programming. A computer attempting to execute a backed up program can not possibly view a file in this manner and attempt to show you 'noise' because the computer is missing an instruction in it's likely already compiled code and without being the actual programmer or having access to the original source code good luck knowing what instruction is actually missing.

Comment Re:Panspermia (Score 1) 186

They found that the tail includes "dust" as large as bacteria, and since high-altitude airplane and balloon samples had shown bacteria at all altitudes, our default assumption should be that there are bacteria (mostly in spore form) in our planet's dust tail.

This is assuming that all bacteria isn't burned up and killed in our atmosphere before becoming the dust trail we have spotted. They would have to test samples from the actual dust trail to know if there is living life exiting our planet and being sent across galaxies.

Take your work seriously but never take yourself seriously; and do not take what happens either to yourself or your work seriously. -- Booth Tarkington