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Comment: Re:how can i tell if my router is affected? (Score 1) 134

by sleekware (#46243305) Attached to: Linksys Routers Exploited By "TheMoon"

I have a WRT54 running the original linksys software. I know you guys will say to push DDWRT onto it. In any case, how can i tell if my router's been compromised? It has been flakey lately but I figured that was just signal interference.

Also running original firmware, with a newer Linksys. Short of doing the most reasonable thing and swapping out my firmware for third party, I'm thinking of upgrading to the latest manufacturers firmware and then treating the router's IP as an untrusted site in my browser, adding an exception only when I need to make a change. Perhaps this would thwart? Also not using the default IP, didn't see it mentioned if that would matter...

Comment: Re:FB2K FTW (Score 1) 400

by sleekware (#45476297) Attached to: Winamp Shutting Down On December 20
I was a big fan of Winamp and I converted to foobar2000 for my music a few years ago. It's true that it can be cumbersome out of box, but I save my settings and it works for me and it's the only player I use now. It is much different from Winamp, but I like it much better. That being said it isn't for everyone, but if you like to tweak the heck out of things it's your friend. Interesting yet, the guy who wrote foobar used to do some work for the creators of Winamp:

foobar2000 is a freeware audio player for Windows developed by Peter Pawlowski, a former freelance contractor for Nullsoft. It is known for its highly modular design, breadth of features, and extensive user flexibility in configuration. For example, the user-interface is completely customizable.[5] Its extensive SDK allows third-party developers enough power to completely replace the interface. foobar2000 supports a large number of audio file formats, has many features for organising metadata, files, and folders, and has a converter interface for use with command line encoders. To maximize audio fidelity in cases where resampling or downscaling in bit depth is required, it provides noise shaping and dithering. There are a number of official and third-party components which add many additional features. The core is closed source, whereas the SDK is licensed under the BSD license.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foobar2000 foobar2000 site: http://www.foobar2000.org/ download: http://www.foobar2000.org/download

IT

+ - Best I.T. Apps for Mobile?

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "While trying to search for I.T. apps for mobile devices, it seems that there are many apps that do the same thing. Which are the best? Some simple desires are SSH capabilities, remote control, network monitoring, Active Directory Password resets, WiFi surveillance, etc. I recently was issued a company iPhone and would like to know which are the best applications to load to help out with my job, without having to sort through the thousands of mediocre ones. Which apps have you had good experiences with?"

Comment: Re:Still hanging on dearly to my IBM Model M... (Score 1) 332

by sleekware (#34794682) Attached to: Will Touch Screens Kill the Keyboard?

The model M keyboard has a Ps/2 connector. Sounds like your referring to the earlier PC/AT keyboard which had the 5-pin DIN connector.

Some of the early Model M keyboards did come with an AT connector according to this feature list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model_M_keyboard#Features_by_part_number

Music

Atari Loses Copyright Suit Against RapidShare 198

Posted by Soulskill
from the game-over-play-again? dept.
dotarray writes "Online copyright lawsuits aren't all about music. Video game publisher Atari Europe recently became concerned that copies of its game Alone in the Dark were floating around one-click file-hosting service RapidShare, so it took the hosting company to court. While they won the initial case, the decision was overturned on appeal, finding that RapidShare is doing nothing wrong."
IBM

IBM's Jeopardy Strategy 99

Posted by samzenpus
from the john-henry dept.
jfruhlinger writes "Developing a computer that could play chess once seemed like a worthy AI goal — but it turned out to be something of a dead end, as chess is very abstract and simple when compared to the real world. Will creating a game-show-playing computer lead to more interesting results? IBM hopes so, and its Watson machine will tackle problems in parallel processing, data searching, and natural language comprehension in an attempt to beat Jeopardy legends Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter. " IBM announced the man vs. machine competition last month.
The Courts

Xbox Modding Trial Dismissed 179

Posted by Soulskill
from the game-over dept.
It seems the harsh words from District Court Judge Philip Gutierrez on Wednesday had their intended effect; prosecutors in Matthew Crippen's Xbox modding case have now dismissed the indictment. Quoting Wired: "Witness No. 1, Tony Rosario, was an undercover agent with the Entertainment Software Association. He told jurors Wednesday that he paid Crippen $60 in 2008 to modify an Xbox, and secretly videotaped the operation. Rosario had responded to Crippen’s advertisement on the internet and met Crippen at his Anaheim house. All of that had been laid out in pretrial motions. But during his testimony, Rosario also said Crippen inserted a pirated video game into the console to verify that the hack worked. That was a new detail that helped the government meet an obligation imposed by the judge that very morning, when Gutierrez ruled that the government had to prove Crippen knew he was breaking the law by modding Xboxes. But nowhere in Rosario’s reports or sworn declarations was it mentioned that Crippen put a pirated game into the console. ... [Prosecutor Allen Chiu] conceded he never forwarded that information to the defense."
Education

200 Students Admit Cheating After Professor's Online Rant 693

Posted by samzenpus
from the people-get-what-they-deserve dept.
Over 200 University of Central Florida students admitted to cheating on a midterm exam after their professor figured out at least a third of his class had cheated. In a lecture posted on YouTube, Professor Richard Quinn told the students that he had done a statistical analysis of the grades and was using other methods to identify the cheats, but instead of turning the list over to the university authorities he offered the following deal: "I don't want to have to explain to your parents why you didn't graduate, so I went to the Dean and I made a deal. The deal is you can either wait it out and hope that we don't identify you, or you can identify yourself to your lab instructor and you can complete the rest of the course and the grade you get in the course is the grade you earned in the course."
Graphics

Wolfenstein Gets Ray Traced 184

Posted by Soulskill
from the ach-mein-framen dept.
An anonymous reader writes "After showcasing Quake Wars: Ray Traced a few years ago, Intel is now showing their latest graphics research project using Wolfenstein game content. The new and cool special effects are actually displayed on a laptop using a cloud-based gaming approach with servers that have an Intel Knights Ferry card (many-core) inside. Their blog post has a video and screenshots."
Businesses

Local TV Could Go the Way of Newspapers 180

Posted by Soulskill
from the not-as-good-for-wrapping-paper-though dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "Alan D. Mutter writes on his 'Reflections of a Newsosaur' blog that the economics of local broadcasting may begin to unravel as dramatically in the next five years as they did for newspapers in the last five years, due to the unparalleled consumer choice made possible by a growing mass of (mostly free) content on the Internet. 'Once it becomes as easy and satisfying to view a YouTube video on your 50-inch television as it is to watch "Two and a Half Men," audiences will fragment to the point that local broadcasters will not be able to attract large quantities of viewers for a particular program,' writes Mutter. The economics of cable TV programming already are geared to serving small but targeted niches, but as audiences shatter, those options won't be available to local broadcasters, who will be deprived of the vast reach that enabled the high ad rates and enviable profits long associated with their businesses. Although barely 8% of US households had access to IPTV in 2009, this technology is likely to be available to some 20% of the more than 100 million homes subscribing to pay-television services in 2014, according to senior analyst Lee Ratliff of iSuppli, a private market research company. 'We already have gotten a hint of what the future could hold. Acting to trim spending during the recession, many local stations cut back their news staffs, resulting in a decline in the caliber and depth of their coverage,' writes Mutter."

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