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Security

40-Gbps DDoS Attacks Worry Even Tier-1 ISPs 146

Posted by kdawson
from the isotropic-tsunami dept.
sturgeon and other readers let us know that Arbor Networks has released their annual survey of tier-1 / tier-2 ISP security engineers. This year they got responses from 70 lead engineers. While DDoS attacks are reaching new heights of backbone-crushing traffic — 40 Gbps was seen this past year — the insiders are also worried about emerging threats to DNS and BGP. The summary notes that "Most believe that the DNS cache poisoning flaw disclosed earlier this year was poorly handled and increased the danger of the threat," but doesn't spell out what a better way of handling it might have been. All in all, the ISPs sound a bit pessimistic — one says "fewer resources, less management support, and increased workload." You can request the full PDF report here, but it will cost you contact information. In related news, an anonymous reader passes along a survey by Secure Computing of 199 international security experts and other "industry insiders" from utilities, oil and gas, financial services, government, telecommunications, transportation and other critical infrastructure industries. They are worried too.
Education

How Regulations Hamper Chemical Hobbyists 610

Posted by timothy
from the council-of-wise-men-strikes-again dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Chemical & Engineering News just ran this story that relates how government regulations create a terribly restrictive atmosphere for people who do chemistry as a hobby. (A related story was previously posted.)" The article gives some examples of why hamfisted regulations are harmful even to those who aren't doing the chemistry themselves: "Hobby chemists will tell you that home labs have been the source of some of chemistry's greatest contributions. Charles Goodyear figured out how to vulcanize rubber with the same stove that his wife used to bake the family's bread. Charles Martin Hall discovered the economical electrochemical process for refining aluminum from its ore in a woodshed laboratory near his family home. A plaque outside Sir William Henry Perkin's Cable Street residence in London notes that the chemist 'discovered the first aniline dyestuff, March 1856, while working in his home laboratory on this site and went on to found science-based industry.'"
Science

Fictional Town "Eureka" To Become Real? 337

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the next-terrorist-targets dept.
Zarath writes "The fictional town of Eureka (from the TV series by the same name) is going to potentially become a real life town as the University of Queensland, in Australia, plans to build a multibillion-dollar 'brain city' dedicated to science and research. The city, hoping to hold at least 10,000 people, is looking to attract 4,500 of the brightest scientists from around the world to live and work there. The city is planned to be built west of the city of Brisbane, in Queensland. While not funded by the Department of Defense (like the [city of the] TV series), the potential for such a community is very interesting and exciting."
Space

Plasma Rocket Successful Full Power Test 169

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the to-infinity-and-beyond dept.
Matt_dk writes "VASIMR is a new high-power plasma-based space propulsion technology, initially studied by NASA and now being developed privately by Ad Astra. A VASIMR engine could maneuver payloads in space far more efficiently and with much less propellant than today's chemical rockets. Ultimately, VASIMR engines could also greatly shorten robotic and human transit times for missions to Mars and beyond."
Space

Black Holes May Not Grow Beyond Certain Limit 201

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the stand-back-I-don't-know-how-big-it's-gonna-get dept.
xyz writes "Do black holes increase in size indefinitely? According to an analysis by astronomers at Yale and the European Southern Observatory, the maximum size a black hole may reach is only few tens of billion of solar masses. The limit was calculated using an analysis of what may happen to the gas surrounding a black hole which has reached few tens of billions of solar masses. It is thought that black holes of such size heat the surrounding gas to a temperature where the radiation pressure begins blowing outer layers into space."
Cellphones

Why Your Clock Radio Is All Abuzz About iPhones 397

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the i-hate-that-sound-so-much dept.
blackbearnh wrote in with a story that's not really about the iPhone, but if your office speakerphones beep like mine does, read on: "If you own an iPhone, you may have noticed that it has a distinct and very annoying effect on clock radios, computer speakers, car radios, and just about anything else with a speaker. The folks at O'Reilly Media aren't immune, so they set out to discover just what is it about iPhones that makes them such bad RF citizens. The iPhones aren't the only bad apples in the cell phone basket and there's not much you can do about the problem. We're really in an interesting time in that there has never been so many high-powered personal transmitters just wandering loose in the world."
Quickies

+ - Free Software empowers minority languages->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A Localisation workshop held in Morocco earlier this year brought various African localisers and linguists together. As a practical component of this gathering Translate.org.za lead an exercise to create OpenOffice.org locales for the various African languages spoken by participants at the event.

Four of these locales will now appear in OpenOffice.org 2.3, demonstrating once again how Free and Open Source software allows speakers of minority languages to change software to meet their needs, instead of hoping (or begging) for a proprietary vendor to care enough to meet their needs."

Link to Original Source
Censorship

+ - Military kills access to YouTube, MySpace

Submitted by
coondoggie
coondoggie writes "The Department of Defense is on the Web warpath again, this time blocking access to YouTube, MySpace and 11 other popular Web sites on its networks. According to a memo sent by Gen. B.B. Bell, the U.S. Forces Korea commander, overseas military personnel will be prevented from using these sites in a effort to protect information and reduce drag on the department's networks. Detractors of the plan says the net effect will be to block access to servicemembers in Iraq and Afghanistan who are the primary users of the sites. Troops and families living on U.S. bases will still be able to view the sites. http://www.networkworld.com/community/?q=node/1512 6"
PC Games (Games)

+ - Ryan Gordon on the future of Games on Linux

Submitted by
jvm
jvm writes "In a Q&A with LinuxGames, Ryan "icculus" Gordon lays out some brutal Linux gaming truths along with a few good reasons for hope. He rates the importance of certain technologies and companies on a scale of 0 to 10 (OpenGL is a 10, WINE and Transgaming a 2) and then goes on to explain each rating in detail. From which company presents the real threat to Linux adoption to why 2008 is likely to be a big year for Linux gaming, Ryan has the answers."
Security

+ - Study: Bike helmets expose riders to further risk.

Submitted by doug141
doug141 (863552) writes "A British scientist has shown that wearing a bicycle helmet actually exposes cyclists to further risk. Drivers passed an average of 8.5 cm (3 1/3 inches) closer with the helmet than without. The researcher was struck by both a bus and a truck in the course of the experiment. Will bicycle helmet laws suffer a backlash? How much should legislators weigh science?"

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