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Comment I didn't inhale these emails (Score 4, Insightful) 348

Nor did I have sex with these emails.

Wouldn't it be nice (a naive thought) if we had a politician who:
1. We could trust
2. Put the country's best interest above his/her own
3. Wasn't in the pockets of the rich

Instead we have trump and clinton.
Maybe they should get married.
They both are the exact opposites of points 1 thru 3 above.

I wonder why people are feeling they are not represented?

Comment What you know, who you know? Both. (Score 2) 242

It's not what you know that will necessarily get you a new job.
It's not who you know that will necessarily get you a new job.

It's both plus having the ability to communicate in a reasonable manner.

When you are "experienced" and have quite a few years of development behind you, a decent developer will have built up a list of friends from previous or current jobs. Hopefully, these friends respect your ability to develop. When it comes time to obtain a new job, hitting up those friends is an invaluable resource. I have hired several colleagues from previous encounters in this manner. I have even hired the same guy twice. Each time I moved jobs, I pulled him in behind me. I have also been hired twice thru personal references myself.

Just think about it. Do you think an interview is much more than a crapshoot? You are trying to judge the suitability of a candidate based upon a few hours of interaction. Wouldn't you rather judge someone based upon their past performance of which you (or a friend you trust) are familiar, having previously worked with them?

I'm not saying that an old dog shouldn't learn new tricks. Far from it. It's every developer's responsibility to maintain their skill set. I am extolling the virtues of building a network of past/current colleagues who might be of help to you in the future, just as you might be of help to them.

Comment Lay-offs were good to me (Score 2) 179

I was layed off twice:
The first layoff, a major client representing more than 50% of the business left. Layoffs were inevitable. I asked my boss if he could get me in the first round of layoffs. He said "no" and shook his head affirmatively, adding a wink. I received 6 months salary (I had been working there 6 years) and had a new job one week later getting more money.
The second layoff, the entire industry (banking) was suffering a severe downturn and many banks were shedding employees. I wanted to retire. I asked my boss if layoffs were coming and he said "yes". I asked him if I could be put on the list and he again said "yes". I had to wait for 6 months which was agonizing but I received about 5 months money (I had been working there for 10 years) which was significantly better than resigning where I would have received nothing.
So here are my tips:
1. Always be on good terms with your boss. If you aren't, get a new boss by switching departments or jobs.
2. If layoffs are coming, always be in on the first round. You typically get a better severance deal.
3. It goes without saying that you should always keep yourself with marketable skills as you never know when a job will end.

Comment Trains for people (Score 1) 258

So we are going to pay for a nuclear freight train to nowhere?
Couldn't we instead use the money to improve the existing rail network to encourage humans to use it?
The rail service in this country is such a joke that most people choose to pay between 3 and 4 dollars a gallon for gas, increasing pollution and funding the arms buildup in the middle east.

Comment Let it self-destruct or interfere and prolong it (Score 3, Interesting) 542

Much of the foreign interference offered by this country's government results in the reverse of what they were trying to achieve.
To meddle in something that is none of your business merely tends to give credibility to whatever you disagreed with in the first place.

“Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.” - George Carlin.
“Never argue with a fool, onlookers may not be able to tell the difference.” - Mark Twain.

So if Iran or wherever wants to pass stupid edicts, just let it go ahead.
Have some respect for Iranians to recognize a horse's ass for what it is.
If a stupid government passes a sufficient number of dumb edicts that they eventually make themselves irrelevant.

Or maybe we should interfere and start another war which would surely help support a dumb regime (on both sides).

Comment very, very private (Score 1) 124

Typed URL into my browser and after a long wait got:
Server Error in '/' Application.
Runtime Error
Description: An application error occurred on the server. The current custom error settings for this application prevent the details of the application error from being viewed remotely (for security reasons).
[...and some more]

Comment No job, no schedule, no worries (Score 5, Interesting) 311

Eat your hearts out.
I'm recently retired and loving it.
I'm currently building a kayak rack in my back yard without any deadlines.
Sometimes I just put down the tools and paddle off to check my crab pots.
At the start of every day I sit on my patio overlooking the water, drink my coffee and decide what (if anything) I will do for the rest of the day.
I wish I could have retired 40 years ago.
So long and thanks for the fish.

Comment Just another process crash? (Score 1) 45

"I'm going to rebuild the car kernel and take her out for a spin" Sentences like this can give a more literal meaning to the crash and burn of a process. I suppose they take the injured driver to a hospital with his core dump. Who guarantees there was even adequate unit testing done before a car goes out onto the highway with other unsuspecting drivers? Then again, I suppose its the same answer as to when I added the airbag suspension to my low-rider without getting my car re-inspected.

Comment Conclusion: it will never happen (Score 1) 360

I have been educating users for years on how to submit even vaguely reasonable problem reports. It's an uphill battle.

Everything in our system has a ticket id.
More than 90% of all problem reports never mention a ticket id.

Some of the worst offenders have been other developers!
If peer developers cannot do it, what makes anyone think that the regular user community will step up?

Regard it as an exercise in patience and endlessly request the ticket id that was missing from the original problem report.

Be careful when a loop exits to the same place from side and bottom.