Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Instead... (Score 1) 355

I'm not actually experiencing what you're saying. Where I've seen sites use Bootstrap, or use one of the new Wordpress themes etc, they've actually been pretty usable on a mobile device.

The real problems are getting to be the non-WWW stuff people forget about, like responsive HTML emails.

Apple

Apple Watch Launches 160

Posted by Soulskill
from the it's-all-in-the-wrist dept.
An anonymous reader writes: The Apple Watch's release date has arrived: retailers around the world have quietly begun putting them on their shelves, and customers are beginning to receive their shipments. Reviews have been out for a while, including thoughtful ones from John Gruber and Nilay Patel. Apple has published a full user guide for the software, and iFixit has put up a full teardown to take a look at the hardware. They give it a repairability score of 5 out of 10, saying that the screen and battery are easily replaced, but not much else is. Though Apple designated the watch "water-resistant" rather than "waterproof", early tests show it's able to withstand a shower and a swim in the pool without failing. Ars has an article about the difficulty of making games for the Apple Watch, and Wired has a piece detailing its creation.

Comment: Re:systemd is a bad joke (Score 1) 450

by squiggleslash (#49547063) Attached to: Ubuntu 15.04 Released, First Version To Feature systemd

Ask Linux Torvalds what he thought of what people in operating system design (namely, Andrew Tanenbaum, who famously called Linux "obsolete") thought.

I think Linus (not Linux) Torvalds is actually an operating system designer. He's also one of many who disagrees with Tanenbaum. Neither of which has anything to do with anything at this point, he's not the one designing the whole of Ubuntu or Fedora, his work is on a small part of it that doesn't handle the userland start up process.

The people who are designing Ubuntu, Fedora, etc, are saying init, both in its bad System V version, and in its "Scales for everything you need a 386 to do" BSD variant, is not up to the job in a world that has USB, Bluetooth, e-SATA, et al, in it. I think they're right, personally. And to be honest, I think they've been right since the early 1990s, when Internet service protocols were kinda grafted on, moved to inetd, augmented by Sun RPC services, NFS, blah, etc, and the phenomenon of a Unix system that wouldn't boot up due to anything other than hardware failure or disk corruption suddenly became very real and very common.

"We" haven't done much about it since then largely due to a combination of inertia and the fact an average Unix admin was skilled in shell scripting. The latter hasn't been true, however, for a good ten years, which is why Apple has LaunchD, and why Ubuntu also threw out init in favor of modern alternatives, initially Upstart, and now SystemD.

Comment: Re:So, where's IBM in all of this? (Score 1) 76

by squiggleslash (#49546993) Attached to: Amazon's Profits Are Floating On a Cloud (Computing)

No idea, but just because you don't see their name on the product doesn't mean it's not their's. In the past they've been very big on data centers, leasing the equipment and supporting it. You wouldn't know that just because Amazon's name is on the product, any more than you would know IBM's hardware powered Ford's data centers when you bought your Ford Escort.

Comment: Re:It is a cycle. (Score 1) 76

by squiggleslash (#49546877) Attached to: Amazon's Profits Are Floating On a Cloud (Computing)

I'm not seeing that. There was a gradual move to decentralization that peaked in the late eighties/early nineties, but then it's been gradual centralization, partially due to ubiquitous office networking (early nineties), and then due to ubiquitous Internet connectivity (mid nineties on.)

There may have been slight ripples during that time that affected the acceleration of the curve, but the broad curve itself was never interrupted.

My history would show:

1950s-1970s: Era of the highly centralized mainframe, with minis used in occasional scientific applications.
1970s-1980s: Increasing use of minicomputers, plus rise of the micro, some of which made their way into businesses. It's slightly less centralized but users are still sharing common computer resources.
1980s-late 1980s: Rise of the home/micro and PC, almost all applications local save for occasional use of Terminal emulators to access "legacy" applications on a central mainframe or minicomputer. Most new development is of decentralized, disconnected, tools.
Late 1980s-1995: Rise of the network. Client-server application development starts to take off. Development in business starts to be for partially distributed, but partially centralized, applications.
1995-2005: Rise of the Internet and associated standards. Businesses start to move all their core applications to the web, leaving a handful of Office type apps as the sole remaining decentralized stuff.
2005+: Rise of the cloud. Driven by a combination of mature web standards, the explosion of interest in non-PC devices, the increasing use and popularization of hosting services, and businesses that run data centers finding they're both hellishly expensive (yet unavoidable) and inevitably end up with huge amounts of unused capacity, there's a huge movement to move core business applications to services like AWS.

If there's a move against the grain (either towards centralization before the late 1980s, or away from centralization after 1995) I missed it.

Don't be fooled, if you have been, by the occasional post-1994 move towards more client devices, frequently out of control of IT (such as the BYOD movement), those initiatives only work because the core business applications are centralized and accessible using standard clients.

Comment: Re:Instead... (Score 1) 355

Every other new site I see developed these days tends to be written using Bootstrap. Older sites have the entirely reasonable excuse that overhauling an existing design takes time. But I'm seeing older sites switch over to newer technologies. Newer default Wordpress themes are also generally responsive by default, and I assume the same is true of other CMS systems.

Bootstrap isn't perfect but it's pretty good at making it easy to set up a professional looking website that happens to be responsive too.

Comment: Re:Common sense here folks (Score 2) 108

Nobody said that the nerves are going to work. Post transplant, the person will certainly be paralyzed from the neck down. That's why this kind of surgery is only appropriate for a paraplegic whose body is about to fail. He or she is not going to stop being a paraplegic, but might get many extra years of life by acquiring a robust new body.

Comment: Re:systemd is a bad joke (Score 2) 450

by squiggleslash (#49545679) Attached to: Ubuntu 15.04 Released, First Version To Feature systemd

Ubuntu isn't adding another. They're switching from Upstart, which they were pretty much the only user of left, to SystemD.

BSD init isn't remotely scalable, and requires knowledge of shell scripting from any admin configuring their system or installing software the OS's maintainers didn't plan for. It's actually a worse choice than Sys V init. Hence Apple's (absolutely right) decision to do LaunchD.

You'll have to ask the maintainers of SystemD as to why specifically they saw the other solutions as lacking, but at a guess LaunchD is too tied to Mac OS X and BSD, SMF to Solaris/BSD, and Upstart doesn't solve all the problems SystemD is designed to solve.

Comment: Re:systemd is a bad joke (Score 3, Insightful) 450

by squiggleslash (#49545243) Attached to: Ubuntu 15.04 Released, First Version To Feature systemd

the rest of us who have used and managed unix since the 80's have to dump WHAT WORKED WELL and move to some new shit that clearly has issues, does not fit in or belong very well and is being forced on us.

SystemD replaces components that Ubuntu already replaced long ago. The question here for the Ubuntu team was:

1. Do they keep LaunchD, when it offers few, if any, advantages over SystemD, and they're the only people using it and thus they have to maintain it, and Ubuntu stays non-standard.
2. Do they switch back to "init" because it used to be the standard, and it kinda works, except it's kind of convoluted and a huge source of problems, which is why LaunchD was written in the first place.
3. Do they look at what everyone else is switching to (ie SystemD), see if it does the same job as LaunchD just as effectively, and switch to it?

They chose 3. I'd chose 3 too. There's nothing wrong with SystemD, it's just the developers have no PR skills, and some old Unix people are harking back to a past that was never actually that great to begin with. SysV init sucked. It didn't sendmail.cf suck, but it definitely CNEWS sucked. Complicated, over-burdened by shell scripts and hacks to try to keep it going. SystemD isn't perfect, but it's undeniably an improvement.

Comment: Such hyperbole in TFS (Score 2) 33

by fyngyrz (#49544657) Attached to: MIT Developing AI To Better Diagnose Cancer

MIT Developing AI To Better Diagnose Cancer

FFS, it's not AI. It's a mindless program. Unthinking software. Data analysis software. Innovative to some degree perhaps, but AI? Hardly. No better than me stumbling in here and calling some DSP code I'd written "AI." Well, except I wouldn't do that. :/

When AI gets here, we'll have to call it something else what with all this crying wolf going on.

Unix is the worst operating system; except for all others. -- Berry Kercheval

Working...