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Comment Re:"At that price it's almost a burner" (Score 1) 153

I paid 80 bucks new from Amazon for this now discontinued phone.

Quite respectable, and a few months ago, was my best pick under 100 bucks. My girlfriend uses it, and she didn't want anything expensive, just basic Android apps, internet, etc. By anyone's standard, this is a smart phone.


Ask Slashdot: What Non-lethal Technology Has the Best Chance of Replacing the Gun? 644

Wycliffe writes: Most cops are not out to kill someone, but when someone reaches for a cellphone or their glovebox, the cop may assumes the worst and try to protect themselves from dying. Guns are used to immobilize the target, and aren't even that good at it when a person is charging. What other potential devices could be used to protect a cop so that guns are unnecessary? Foam? Lightweight body armor? Nets? Robots? 'M.A.N.T.I.S.' paralyzing gas? Force field? What non-lethal technology out there has the best potential to be more effective at immobilizing a target and/or protecting a cop than a gun?

Comment San Francisco prices are so high... (Score 3, Informative) 392

...because of multiple government regulations that have choked off supply, namely:

* Rent Control
* Excessive environmental regulations
* Excessive land use regulations
* An institutional hostility to landlords (so bad that many landlords simply refuse to rent at all since renters could tie them up in court for years when they tried to sell the property).
* California's general hostility to development.

And now San Francisco has said they'll try to limit price increases by restricting supply. Looks like someone failed Economics 101.

Bonus: Did you know that the Rev. Jim Jones (yes, that one) once served on San Francisco's Housing Authority?

Comment *WIN-BATTERIES?!?* (Score 1) 42

Someone needs to punch this idea in the throat right now before it gets deployed anywhere.

Need I remind the membership of the decades-long clusterfsck resulting from so-called "Win-modems" whose codecs were moved from hardware into host software and to this day remain completely undocumented? Even people who put down hard cash for a WinModem driver found themselves left to twist in the wind when the 3.x kernel series came out (modems may be mostly obsolete, but FAXes aren't (yet)).

Now: Who would like to bet that the WinBattery interface will not significantly extend battery life over what we have now, remain completely undocumented (or trapped behind onerous licensing that forbids Open Source implementations), and leave Linux and *BSD users with systems with significantly shortened battery life because they can't control the power interface?

This is yet another naked attempt to bottle up critical system functionality behind a Microsoft-only wall (because apparently fscking everyone over with UEFI and (In-)Secure Boot wasn't enough).

"Consider a spherical bear, in simple harmonic motion..." -- Professor in the UCB physics department