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Comment: Re:Once (Score 1) 217

This already doesn't work with the Do Not Call registry. I have telemarketers claim that they get "one free call" to every number. So they call EVERY known number for customer A. Then they get a new client, customer B. They change the business name under which they are calling and start at the beginning of their list. They NEVER STOP CALLING damnit. When you go to the FTC site to register a complaint, right there on the form they ask "Have you asked them not to call back?", rather implying that the feds will take no action unless they have called repeatedly using the same business name. Now you figure it makes sense to make it easier for the crooks to do this "one free call" with cell phones? Save yourself some grief and throw your cell phone in the trash if this goes through.

Comment: Re:5 euro, no limits, right now (Score 1) 314

by scatter_gather (#40687097) Attached to: Fair price for an unlimited wireless data plan?

You are missing one thing: 3G is old tech in the US. ...

Comparing 3G data plans to 4G data plans is apples to oranges, they have nothing in common, except for the unfortunate fact that in the US, customers arent bothered with choosing one or the other, so they get a "Data plan" that includes both. Before long, we are going to see 3G "limited" devices sold under more aggressive pricing, but until then it's 4G or bust.

Of course "4G" in the US is nothing more than a marketing term. The "4G" from one carrier is not the same as from another, and none of them provide the performance that the 4G standard actually specifies. The comparison is more like apples to oranges to monkeys to motorcycles. The pricing still really comes down to whether you can profitably recover your infrastructure investment in a country the size of the US as compared to a country little bigger than the state of New Mexico.

Comment: Re:Not the First Discovery in Coding Theory (Score 1) 66

by scatter_gather (#34344434) Attached to: 60 Years of Hamming Codes
To summarize the article that you seemed not to have read, Shannon is cited as writing the seminal paper to which you refer, and in it created an existence proof for error correction codes. He did not, in his paper, actually go so far as to create an ECC. According to TFA, Shannon is credited with creating the entire field of information theory. Not a bad accomplishment. Hamming was noted as actually creating ECCs and laying the foundation stone for coding theory. It's probably why they named the codes after him, hmm? Many codes more suited to today's computational needs have been developed since, but someone had to be first.

Comment: Soroc (Score 2, Interesting) 94

by scatter_gather (#33515752) Attached to: How 6 Memorable Tech Companies Got Their Names
Soroc Technologies was an early intelligent (well, ok, dumb) terminal company, started back in 1981. Well, they were smart enough to put the cursor where you wanted and do a few other tricks. Anyway, the name came from a night of drinking beer and trying to think up a new company name. They were drinking Coors at the time, and decided that an anagram of Coors would fit the bill. The company still exists, see www.soroc.com, and check out the company logo. Yes, it is the top of the beer can.

This was related to me one night over dinner by the company founder.
Supercomputing

Homebrew Cray-1 140

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the when-i-was-a-child dept.
egil writes "Chris Fenton built his own fully functional 1/10 scale Cray-1 supercomputer. True to the original, it includes the couch-seat, but is also binary compatible with the original. Instead of the power-hungry ECL technology, however, the scale model is built around a Xilinx Spartan-3E 1600 development board. All software is available if you want to build one for your own living room. The largest obstacle in the project is to find original software."

Comment: Re:Obviously fake (Score 1) 238

by scatter_gather (#33037244) Attached to: Why You Never Ask the Designers For a Favor
Actually I taught my cat to fetch a dumbbell. Now granted, the dumbbell was the spool from a 35mm roll of film (this was a long time ago, pre-handycam era so sorry, no video), but she would fetch it just the same. I would toss it from the living room into the kitchen where she would run sliding all over the place as it bounced off chair legs. When she caught it she would bring it back and drop it in my shoe and await the next round.

A friend of mine taught cats to do tricks for movies and television, so it is really a bit silly to assume that cats can't learn tricks.

If you are good, you will be assigned all the work. If you are real good, you will get out of it.

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