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Comment: Re:Everyone is a potential criminal in L.A. (Score 1) 405

by rotor (#46565383) Attached to: L.A. Police: <em>All</em> Cars In L.A. Are Under Investigation

So, make the Abnegation the leaders and you're all set. Except then the psychos in the Erudite will envy that control and will start a war to gain it. Oh, and Marcus will be acting as an Abnegation while he's really a self serving psychopath who learned that to hold power he could act as a selfless person.

Funny - I though Divergent was poorly written drivel (around a somewhat entertaining story), but as a reaction to your post it seems pretty intelligent.

Comment: Re:A lot of hunters are asshats (Score 1) 397

by rotor (#46564973) Attached to: Drone-Assisted Hunting To Be Illegal In Alaska

3 to 4 weeks - not months. And it will be on the ballot this fall to outlaw it. It's a trickier vote than you'd think too. On the surface, baiting seems like cheating to me as a bow and firearm hunter, but I have not hunted bear. I know that there is a population problem in Maine and there are public safety concerns as the move into more suburban and urban areas. I also know from my years in the woods (hunting, camping, hiking, etc) that they are very hard to spot. I've only seen a handful of bears in the woods and only one that I might have been able to get a shot off on if I'd been hunting for it. State Biologists are currently supporting the baited bear hunt as a way to control the population.

Back to the topic though, I certainly don't support drones for hunting. At least not for animals like moose. Here in Maine I've never known anyone who's had a moose tag and come back without one. Maybe in Alaska it's different, but they don't appear to be all that hard to hunt (though I've never had a moose tag myself).

Comment: More rugged (Score 1) 495

by rotor (#45586739) Attached to: I wish my cell phone was...

I have a flip-phone at this point and it's held up reasonably (Samsung Convoy 2), but it costs more to replace it with another rugged flip-phone than to "buy" a new smart phone now. Give me a rugged smart phone with reasonable reception and I'll consider it, but right now the only choice (sharing minutes with family on Verizon) is that Casio that can't pick a signal no matter where you are.

Comment: Very close to my take on it (Score 4, Interesting) 732

by rotor (#45348405) Attached to: Movie Review: <em>Ender's Game</em>

I thoroughly enjoyed the movie version of Ender's Game, but agree wholeheartedly with the reviewer's take on what succeeded and what failed. In fact, I probably enjoyed it so much because I expected much less. The glaring failures were all necessary to make a successful movie, but they still managed to indicate the most important philosophical points. Yes, Graff was harder than in the book (and Anderson's softness was used to make up for this), Bean was introduced too early and wasn't adversarial at first like he should have been, and what were they thinking with the romantic overtones with Petra... But we know why Ender did what he did and how it affected him, and that didn't change from the book.

My one sadness about this movie is that it didn't inspire my son to read the book (he started it last year, read the first paragraph of Graff's pre-chapter conversation, and decided he didn't want to read it). But at least my copy is now on loan to one of his friends who was inspired to read it.

Comment: Re:Still Be Purchased (Score 1) 443

by rotor (#45214387) Attached to: I wish my car could...

Maybe it's just the area I live in, but I know absolutely nobody who owns anything larger than an F150 (or equivalent) who doesn't use it for things that a smaller truck wouldn't work for*. Unless you count the SUVs being used as family haulers. Even then - kids are more involved these days in travel sports with lots of equipment requirements. Being limited to a sub-compact doesn't work with more than one kid anymore. Granted, most could get by with a wagon or minivan, but the SUV isn't as ridiculous as people make them out to be.

* side note - I actually know several people who don't want a larger truck so they're hauling 8000+ pound trailers with trucks rated for 7000 or less. I'd rather have them driving the 350 even though the 150 (certain models without the trailer fully loaded) would do.

Comment: Re:Here we go! (Score 1) 303

by rotor (#40831833) Attached to: Peter Jackson Announces Third Hobbit Movie

Funny - I really enjoy the beginning of the Silmarillion, but as many times as I've read about half way through the book I just cannot finish it. It holds my attention very well to a point (and it's been many years, so I couldn't even tell you what that point is anymore), but then gets rather long-winded. I want to read the rest because I keep hearing about all of these great stories that I haven't gotten to yet, but I just haven't been able to get there. Maybe next time I start at the mid-point.

Comment: Re:The most used ten chords (Score 1) 576

by rotor (#40819097) Attached to: Study Finds New Pop Music <em>Does</em> All Sound the Same

I also dislike a lot of "modern metal", but I don't really care about understanding the words. Which is very fortunate since I very much enjoy folk metal and don't understand more than a few words of Finnish or Swedish (words I happened to pick up from listening to folk metal). What I don't like about a lot of the modern bands is the fact that they focus more on the aggression than the music. Yeah - having a good angry rhythm is great, but if the "melody" consists of one or two notes played fast with no variation, it gets awfully boring. On the other hand, if you've got a guitarist throwing more notes than should be humanly possible out there, but has no ear for melody it's just as bad.

I'll second your list of Tyr, Subway to Sally, and Skycad, and I'll also add in Finntroll and Korpiklaani as a couple bands I consider "required listening" for folk metal.

"In matters of principle, stand like a rock; in matters of taste, swim with the current." -- Thomas Jefferson

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