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Comment: Technological advancement (Score 1) 85

by redalertbulb (#40709879) Attached to: Patents On Genes: Round Two

With technology moving on as it does, patenting single genes for use in targeted tests will soon become pointless. In a few years (it is happening already), exome sequencing, followed by variant confirmation via Sanger sequencing (directly sequencing the gene, not using a patented kit) will be the normal way to do diagnostics. Nobody will be paying for a single (or even multi) gene testing kit.

Now, if companies decide to try and patent entire exomes (or genomes), things may turn nasty.

My 2 cents (or pennies, where I hail from).

Comment: Re:Tag: whatcouldpossiblygowrong (Score 1) 143

by redalertbulb (#27326285) Attached to: Scientists Reverse Muscular Dystrophy In Dogs
I apologise for the use of the word 'idiotic', I must have been in a bad mood. My point however, is still valid. This treatment is not a cure, but it is true that it may alleviate symptoms to the point of extending life to allow successful procreation. However, (speaking as a father) I would not want to risk any child of mine having this disease, even if this treatment was successful, any male child would still likely die before I did.

As to your final point, I would tend to disagree. Who decides what is 'good' for the human race?

Comment: Re:Tag: whatcouldpossiblygowrong (Score 1) 143

by redalertbulb (#27310099) Attached to: Scientists Reverse Muscular Dystrophy In Dogs
This could increase the rate of this disorder in the whole human race.

Idiotic thing to say for an X-linked disease such as DMD. Females can carry one copy of the gene without showing any symptoms, therefore natural selection cannot breed this disorder out of the population. Males with the disorder generally die before they are old enough to father a child.

Nothing is more admirable than the fortitude with which millionaires tolerate the disadvantages of their wealth. -- Nero Wolfe

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