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Comment: Re:how is this possibly news? (Score 1) 580 580

Not sure if you're intentionally trying to be obtuse or missing the point due to the slightly complex wording.
Half (6) of the 12 day care facilities are below the state average.
What the source is trying to say is that considering silicon valley is an ultra-modern place, they would expect most (if not all) day care facilities to be above state average.

Comment: Re:Midrange? (Score 3, Informative) 114 114

I never said that I'm using 4k.
After your response I think my original comment might make me look like a resolution whore.
My point was NOT that the card should be labeled low end because of 4k. Rather, it should be labeled high end.
I play at 1920x1080 resolution. So from my perspective, the card is high end.
It's just that cards get labeled based on series (like Nvidia x60 series is mid-end) which is primarily based on price.
When there are graphics cards available from $30-3000, the low, mid and high end will be different based on a person's usage and perspective.

My point was that for vast majority of people (according to Steam Hardware survey: > 98%) who would be gaming at 1920x1080 or less, this card would be high end.
(Note to self: Well done on conveying exactly opposite of what you are trying to say without using sarcasm, negation or typos)

Comment: Re:Airline anaolgy is incorrect (Score 1) 448 448

I think what the article is trying to say is that in general we (as consumers) will be at loss even if we want just few extras but not everything.

So say probably you don't want to pay $60 for cable. They may provide a cheap option for $20 which includes free and local channels. However (say in your case) when you add 'true' science channels + HBO + AMC + Showtime (or similar), you'll reach $50 or so. So you'll pay a very similar price losing out 100+ channels. You may not want those channels but those channels are handy when you have friends/relatives (w/kids) over. Primarily the argument is that we won't gain much (if anything).

From the article: "People who once could not afford to visit family members across the country may now be able to find bare-bone tickets within reach."
I think these changes are targeted to cord cutters more than current cable customers. I'm a cord cutter but recently I moved to Comcast's Internet+HBO (includes free and local channels) plan. I'm missing few channels like Comedy Central but I'm ok with streaming from www.comedycentral.com

Comment: Re:Microsoft's 1990's business plan. (Score 5, Insightful) 162 162

I would like to believe you. I really really want to but what's the guarantee?
The adoption of Win 8.x is still quite low. After Steam announced SteamOS, we have seen few companies port their gaming engine to Linux and some hardware manufacturers have started giving some standing to Linux (not saying equal to Windows). Microsoft is at a low right now and 'embracing' seems like a business need more than just a change of heart. How do you know that it won't 'extinguish' cross platform support when it defeats the competitive options.
This is like we had a bad tyrant and we suffered tremendously under this tyrant and it took a DoJ anti-trust lawsuit and a very long amount of time to see meaningful competition in this space again. Now the tyrant is back saying pretty please.
My reply is simple: Fool me once...

+ - Google Announces Motorola-Made Nexus 6 And HTC-Made Nexus 9 1 1

An anonymous reader writes: In addition to Android 5.0 Lollipop, Google today also announced the first devices running the new version of its mobile operating system: the Nexus 6 and the Nexus 9. The former is a phablet built by Motorola, and the latter is a tablet built by HTC. The Nexus 6 is going up for pre-order on October 29, starting at $649. The Nexus 9 meanwhile is going up for pre-order this Friday (October 17), and you’ll also be able to get it in stores on November 3.

Comment: Re:Why not KDE (Score 2) 403 403

Linux noobs generally do NOT use Debian.
They start with ubuntu or some of it's derivative like Mint.
On a personal note, I use Linux Mint as my primary OS and recommend it to any noob who asks me on how to start using Linux. I have no qualms admitting myself as a Linux noob :)

+ - Is there any scenario where violating net neutrality acceptable? 1 1

rcht148 writes: Ever since I heard about T-Mobile's 'Music Freedom' announcement, I have been asking myself this question. If you're unaware of it, T-Mobile recently announced that music streaming from some services (Pandora, iHeartRadio, iTunes Radio, Rhapsody, Slacker, Spotify and some others) will NOT be counted against the customers 4G LTE data cap. I love T-Mobile for the much needed shake-up to the wireless industry that they provided and thanks to them my wireless bill has gone down by almost 40%. In lay man terms this promo sounds great because you get more for your data (Your 2GB 4G LTE plan now means 2GB 4G LTE + music streaming from some providers*). I can't seem to accept this as an engineer. It violates the definition of net neutrality. So, I've been asking myself the broader question, in what scenario does a net neutrality violation become acceptable? If you're a net neutrality supporter do you find this service acceptable?

+ - It's Time To Split Linux In Two 7 7

snydeq writes: Desktop workloads and server workloads have different needs, and it's high time Linux consider a split to more adequately address them, writes Deep End's Paul Venezia. 'You can take a Linux installation of nearly any distribution and turn it into a server, then back into a workstation by installing and uninstalling various packages. The OS core remains the same, and the stability and performance will be roughly the same, assuming you tune they system along the way. Those two workloads are very different, however, and as computing power continues to increase, the workloads are diverging even more. Maybe it's time Linux is split in two. I suggested this possibility last week when discussing systemd (or that FreeBSD could see higher server adoption), but it's more than systemd coming into play here. It's from the bootloader all the way up. The more we see Linux distributions trying to offer chimera-like operating systems that can be a server or a desktop at a whim, the more we tend to see the dilution of both. You can run stock Debian Jessie on your laptop or on a 64-way server. Does it not make sense to concentrate all efforts on one or the other?'

Comment: Re:Overreaction (Score 1) 265 265

How so?
In our cities today, this is already true. There are areas where prices are very high and poorer people can't afford to buy houses there. The same thing would apply for this 'dome city' too.

The article says "may be free to wander through by day, but they will surely find no residence there"; just like our current divide of richer areas vs poorer areas.

Then the article says "It won't be long before there will be those who will be desperate to get inside; and it means an authority will be established to decide who can, and who can't."
Why do you need that? Free market economy will control the prices of housing in the dome just like our current housing rates as per school district lines or proximity to other valuable services.

I don't see how this is any different from our current rich/poor housing divide.

VMS must die!

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