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+ - Google Announces Motorola-Made Nexus 6 And HTC-Made Nexus 9 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "In addition to Android 5.0 Lollipop, Google today also announced the first devices running the new version of its mobile operating system: the Nexus 6 and the Nexus 9. The former is a phablet built by Motorola, and the latter is a tablet built by HTC. The Nexus 6 is going up for pre-order on October 29, starting at $649. The Nexus 9 meanwhile is going up for pre-order this Friday (October 17), and you’ll also be able to get it in stores on November 3."

+ - It's Time To Split Linux In Two 7

Submitted by snydeq
snydeq (1272828) writes "Desktop workloads and server workloads have different needs, and it's high time Linux consider a split to more adequately address them, writes Deep End's Paul Venezia. 'You can take a Linux installation of nearly any distribution and turn it into a server, then back into a workstation by installing and uninstalling various packages. The OS core remains the same, and the stability and performance will be roughly the same, assuming you tune they system along the way. Those two workloads are very different, however, and as computing power continues to increase, the workloads are diverging even more. Maybe it's time Linux is split in two. I suggested this possibility last week when discussing systemd (or that FreeBSD could see higher server adoption), but it's more than systemd coming into play here. It's from the bootloader all the way up. The more we see Linux distributions trying to offer chimera-like operating systems that can be a server or a desktop at a whim, the more we tend to see the dilution of both. You can run stock Debian Jessie on your laptop or on a 64-way server. Does it not make sense to concentrate all efforts on one or the other?'"

+ - Is there any scenario where violating net neutrality acceptable? 1

Submitted by rcht148
rcht148 (2872453) writes "Ever since I heard about T-Mobile's 'Music Freedom' announcement, I have been asking myself this question. If you're unaware of it, T-Mobile recently announced that music streaming from some services (Pandora, iHeartRadio, iTunes Radio, Rhapsody, Slacker, Spotify and some others) will NOT be counted against the customers 4G LTE data cap. I love T-Mobile for the much needed shake-up to the wireless industry that they provided and thanks to them my wireless bill has gone down by almost 40%. In lay man terms this promo sounds great because you get more for your data (Your 2GB 4G LTE plan now means 2GB 4G LTE + music streaming from some providers*). I can't seem to accept this as an engineer. It violates the definition of net neutrality. So, I've been asking myself the broader question, in what scenario does a net neutrality violation become acceptable? If you're a net neutrality supporter do you find this service acceptable?"

Comment: Re:Overreaction (Score 1) 265

by rcht148 (#47420535) Attached to: Dubai's Climate-Controlled Dome City Is a Dystopia Waiting To Happen

How so?
In our cities today, this is already true. There are areas where prices are very high and poorer people can't afford to buy houses there. The same thing would apply for this 'dome city' too.

The article says "may be free to wander through by day, but they will surely find no residence there"; just like our current divide of richer areas vs poorer areas.

Then the article says "It won't be long before there will be those who will be desperate to get inside; and it means an authority will be established to decide who can, and who can't."
Why do you need that? Free market economy will control the prices of housing in the dome just like our current housing rates as per school district lines or proximity to other valuable services.

I don't see how this is any different from our current rich/poor housing divide.

Comment: Re:Thankful for the FOSS drivers on older hardware (Score 3, Informative) 134

by rcht148 (#47166807) Attached to: Testing 65 Different GPUs On Linux With Open Source Drivers

I second this.
I installed Linux Mint 17 recently and first went with the AMD proprietary fglrx drivers.
Overall any video (file playback or gaming) would always be choppy and jittery.

I decided to give the open source radeon drivers a shot. The performance is much better. All the choppiness/jittery is gone.
I may have lost some fps but it was completely worth it.

Comment: Re:12.64 percent in only 17 months (Score 2) 187

by rcht148 (#47152865) Attached to: Windows 8.1 Finally Passes Windows 8 In Market Share

It is a shame the next update still won't have the promised start menu.

I think it makes complete business sense NOT to give start menu to Windows 8.x users.
If they did give it to a Windows 8.x user like me for free, I would lose a major incentive to buy an upgrade to Windows 9.
Not saying that start menu will be the only change in Win 9 but the start menu guarantees that I will be upgrading.

+ - The Truth on OpenGL Driver Quality->

Submitted by rcht148
rcht148 (2872453) writes "Rich Geldreich (game/graphics programmer) has made a blog post on the quality of different OpenGL Drivers. Using anonymous titles (Vendor A: Nvidia; Vendor B: AMD; Vendor C: Intel), he plots the landscape of game development using OpenGL. Vendor A, jovially known as 'Graphics Mafia' concentrates heavily on performance but won't share it's specifications thus blocking any open source driver implementations as much as possible. Vendor B has the most flaky drivers. They have good technical know-how on OpenGL but due to an extremely small team (money woes), they have shoddy drivers. Vendor C is extremely rich. It had not taken graphics seriously until a few years ago. They support open source specifications/drivers wholeheartedly but it will be few years before their drivers come to par with market standards. He concludes that using OpenGL is extremely difficult and without the blessings of these vendors, it's near impossible to ship a major gaming title."
Link to Original Source

+ - AT&T reportedly considering $40 billion DirecTV acquisition->

Submitted by rcht148
rcht148 (2872453) writes "If the idea of Comcast buying out Time Warner Cable to become the largest cable company in America wasn't enough to make you worry about media consolidation, news tonight from the Wall Street Journal just might. Reportedly, AT&T has approached DirecTV to begin "possible acquisition" talks, a deal that the WSJ says could be worth over $40 billion. If it were to happen, it would give the combined company something on the order of 26 million TV subscribers, making it second only to the hypothetical Comcast/TWC combination of 30 million."
Link to Original Source

+ - New Report Notes Over 99 Percent Of Mobile Threats Target Android->

Submitted by MojoKid
MojoKid (1002251) writes "Google's open source Android platform has the distinction of being the most popular mobile operating system in the world. That's great in terms of dominating the market and reaping the rewards that come with it, but it's also for that very reason that Android finds itself the target of virtually every new mobile malware threat that emerges. According to data published in F-Secure's latest Mobile Threat Report, over 99 percent of the new mobile threats it discovered in the first quarter of 2014 targeted Android users. To be fair, we're not taking about hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands, or thousands of malware threats — F-Secure detected 277 new threat families, of which 275 honed in on Android."
Link to Original Source

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