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Comment "the end" (Score 1, Insightful) 622

Between the now completely humourless polls and the numerous slashvertisements for Drupal and now Bitcoin, it's now clear that /. has become just another corporate shill machine. Even the Ask Slashdot crowds aren't even trying anymore ("How can I get rid of undesired email?"... no, REALLY? wtf...)

Sorry, I can't take it anymore.

I'll miss you.

Comment Re:Separate Time Lines (Score 1) 454

The one good question posed by this article is about whether Marty and Jennifer would exist in 2015, after they have just gone off in the time machine w/ Doc Brown in 1985. At that point, we might think they should be removed from any future time line until they return safely to 1985. I can only surmise that when traveling to the future, the Delorean travels along the future time line it is leaving, without regard for any changes it may introduce by doing so.

The author fails to realize one key point, the fact that Marty and Jennifer returned afterwards. If Doc had wanted a more dramatic experiment, he would have sent Einstein back in time after the first time transition. It would have been the same as BTTF2, only with a dog and spanning a minute, instead of our heroes and 30 years.

It would also have been one hell of a shocker for Marty and Doc to see Einstein appear before it even leaves with the clocks marking two minutes more than it should.

Comment Of course there are two DeLoreans (Score 5, Interesting) 454

Of course there are two Deloreans. Doc's and Marty's. It's not a plot hole at all, the whole point is that they can't gut Doc's DeLorean for parts since it would create a paradox and prevent Marty from going back in time to 1885.

The cool thing is that at one point there are FOUR DeLoreans for a few hours in 1955, Marty I, Cowboy Doc, Marty 2 (with Doc) and Biff's.

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