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Comment: Re:Damn Meant to include this (Score 1) 351 351

While a definition relating to organic farming itself is given, definition #3 is likely the origin of the term.
From google:

Organic
1. of, relating to, or derived from living matter.
"organic soils"
synonyms: living, live, animate, biological, biotic
"organic matter"

Chemistry
of, relating to, or denoting compounds containing carbon (other than simple binary compounds and salts) and chiefly or ultimately of biological origin.

(of food or farming methods) produced or involving production without the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, or other artificial agents.
synonyms: pesticide-free, additive-free, natural
"organic vegetables"

2. Physiology
of or relating to a bodily organ or organs.

Medicine
(of a disease) affecting the structure of an organ.

3. denoting a relation between elements of something such that they fit together harmoniously as necessary parts of a whole.
"the organic unity of the integral work of art"

synonyms: structured, organized, coherent, integrated, coordinated, ordered, harmonious
"a society is an organic whole"

characterized by continuous or natural development.
"companies expand as much by acquisition as by organic growth"

Comment: Re:Board Game design (Score 1) 155 155

Scrabble has some flexibility in regards to skills, at least if you're looking to make it enjoyable. My wife is not a native English speaker, so if we play together, we throw out the standard scrabble dictionary and allow words from her native language as well as proper nouns. I'm not sure how highly competitive play goes, but I usually adopt the approach that I need to maximize my score, while minimizing tile usage. This makes the game just math, with valid plays restricted to the set of tile combinations listed in the official scrabble dictionary. Playing informally with my wife, we just use a set with different elements. 2 letter combinations can be extremely valuable, and the set of valid 2 letter plays is fairly small, making it easy to memorize over time, after that a good working knowledge of valid 3-4 letter combinations combined with a good strategy can make a player dangerous.

Comment: Re:something new. (Score 1) 578 578

I can't speak for Chinese or Korean, but Romanized Japanese is a pain in the ass. Even writing only in the Kana, Japanese is rough. The Kanji isn't actually that difficult to learn, helps greatly with understanding the language and even learning only a couple hundred characters (which can be done fairly quickly) can help immensely (also, the more you learn, the easier they get). A benefit to non native speakers is that each character has an abstract meaning associated to it that can often be learned in the student's native tongue. Even if the student forgets how to read/pronounce the character, as long as the character isn't being used solely for phonetic properties, the student can probably get a basic understanding of any signs/documents using those characters. I'm a bit out of practice with my Japanese, I couldn't "read" a sign to you in the traditional sense of the word "read", but if it includes characters I still remember, I can still provide you the general gist. It may not sound useful, but being able to differentiate male and female toilets is often a useful skill when travelling, as well as being aware of warnings.
A lot of this is lost when the language is Romanized, and can even make translation difficult as the Kanji don't represent "words" as much as they represent abstract meaning.

English and its (relatively) close relatives do well with Romanized characters as they've evolved together for quite some time and therefore seem natural and simpler to native speakers. Japanese got a hell of a lot easier to learn once I got over my apprehensiveness about learning Kanji.

Comment: Re:What I like (Score 1) 155 155

I would tend to agree with that for any game played professionally, maybe the competition itself may still be enjoyable, maybe even more than normal at that level, but the amount of work you would have to put into it to maintain your skills would seriously detract from the day to day enjoyment of it. I'd apply that to poker, chess, settlers of catan or counter-strike.

Comment: Re:Board Game design (Score 1) 155 155

I don't mind chance in games, so long as it complements the skill/strategy aspect of the game. I like poker as an example, chance determines the hands in play but a skilled player can turn the weakest hand at the table into the winning hand, at the same time chance can override a seemingly impossible to beat hand.

And then there is Mario Party which destroys relationships.

Comment: Re:Let this be a lesson (Score 1) 75 75

Unfortunately, didn't look closely at the package when we bought it, on the box it states that a connection is required. Getting home we found out that PvZ doesn't just require a connection, it requires PS+, I'd have passed on it for that reason alone except my significant other really, REALLY wanted it and isn't as "principled" as I'd sometimes wish ;)

We ended up getting a PS+ account in order to play it, maybe it would have worked after initial sign in with networking disabled, I suppose I could always test it.

Comment: Re:Let this be a lesson (Score 1) 75 75

I more or less posted this on the last thread, I can't speak for Xbox One as I do not have one, but the PS4, it's games, disc or download work just fine without a network connection as long as THE GAME doesn't require an internet connection.

During the outage I only had 2 games I was unable to play, Destiny (where online is kinda the point) and Plants vs. Zombies Garden Warfare because for whatever reason EA requires a network connection on that game even though it has a local play mode. The rest worked, regardless of whether or not they were on disc or downloaded.

The early bird who catches the worm works for someone who comes in late and owns the worm farm. -- Travis McGee

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