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Oracle

+ - Oracle extends RHEL support to a decade and offers Ksplice trial for RHEL 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A few weeks ago, Red Hat announced it was moving from 7 years of support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux to a full decade. Today, Oracle announced that it was also extending its support duration for Oracle Linux from 8 years to 10 years. Apparently, they're also offering a free trial of Ksplice for RHEL in a move to convince more RHEL customers to switch to Oracle Linux, which advertises free Ksplice rebootless updates, legal indemnification, and lower costs (complete with an amusing cost calculator).

Personally, I'm holding out until Canonical counters by guaranteeing a full millenium of support for Ubuntu LTS releases."
Science

+ - Faster-Than-Light Neutrino Results May Be Due to Bad Cables-> 1

Submitted by thomst
thomst (1640045) writes "Adam Mann of Wired.com reports the finding that neutrinos may exceed lightspeed could be due to faulty optical cable connections.

Scientists from the OPERA collaboration at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy have “identified two issues that could significantly affect the reported result,” wrote OPERA spokesman Antonio Ereditato in an email. The first issue is a faulty connection of the fiber-optic cable bringing the GPS signal to the experiment’s master clock. The experiment’s GPS may also have been providing the wrong timestamps during synchronization between events.

When the Large Hadron Collider begins goes operational next month, the OPERA researchers will use it to re-test their findings on neutrinos' lawless behavior ..."

Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Plumber Injection Attack in Bowser’s Castle-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Security Advisory SMB-1985-0001: Plumber Injection Attack in Bowser’s Castle

Ksplice, working in conjunction with Lakitu Cloud Security, has released a high-severity advisory about a Plumber Injection attack in multiple versions of Bowser's Castle. An Italian plumber could exploit this bug to bypass security measures (walk through walls) in order to rescue Peach, to defeat Bowser, or for unspecified other impact.

This vulnerability is demonstrated by "happylee-supermariobros,warped.fm2". Attacks using this exploit have been observed in the wild, and multiple other exploits are publicly available. A patch has been made available."

Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Ksplice apparently running on 100,000 servers->

Submitted by quartertime
quartertime (1764250) writes "Remember Ksplice, the startup that has been claiming they have technology to make rebootless updates for the Linux kernel? When they launched their commercial product last year, we weren't sure whether people would pay $4/month for it.
Well, it turns out that the answer is yes — according to their birthday blog post about having reached all 7 continents, more than 2 million rebootless updates have been installed on over 100,000 production servers.

Personally, I'm looking forward to when IBM's Watson starts updating its own code to fix all the bugs introduced by us humans."

Link to Original Source
Security

+ - One year of rebootless kernel updates on Linux->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "One year ago, nobody believed you could update your kernel without rebooting.

It's been a year since we reported on the launch of Ksplice Uptrack, a subscription service for rebootless kernel updates on Linux. In that time they've deployed on 100,000 production servers, shipped 2 million rebootless kernel updates, and seen adoption on all 7 continents. I'm personally holding out until there are rebootless updates IN SPACE."

Link to Original Source
Hardware

+ - Simultaneous Tx/Rx Radios Developed->

Submitted by ericn32
ericn32 (1351963) writes "Researchers at Stanford University have developed a radio technology that could lead to significant improvements in radio signal throughput. Currently, radios must transmit and receive simultaneously on different channels, or alternate transmission on a single channel, due to the fact that a radio may become "overwhelmed" by the signal it is transmitting and not listen to incoming signals. These radios overcome this problem by ignoring the noise they produce and can simultaneously transmit to another radio while receiving signals from another on the same channel.

Stanford University News via ZDNet"

Link to Original Source
Firefox

+ - Firefox 5 To Integrate Tab Web Apps->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "We are hearing that Firefox 4 is now scheduled for a late March release and that the company has some issues fixing the right bugs as more non-blocking than blocking bugs are patched. However, on a positive note, the UI design team has posted some intriguing mockups of partial Firefox 5 interfaces. The big change will be the creation of a site-specific browser, which turns websites into tab apps within Firefox 5. This is the first time we are seeing Mozilla ideas how to deal with the app-ification of the Internet and a strategy to keep the web browser relevant."
Link to Original Source
Games

+ - Valve beats Google, Apple for profits per employee->

Submitted by AndrewGOO9
AndrewGOO9 (1251062) writes "It should come with little surprise that Gabe Newell is well on his way to being one of the wealthiest men in gaming. In an age when console gamers would have many believe that the PC was on it's way out the door, Newell and Valve's Steam stand as sentinels of the platform, offering a ridiculous amount of content to the 30 million users. With the lion's share of the downloadable market on the PC, it's no wonder that Steam has become the go-to for many and an incredible financial opportunity for Newell and Valve."
Link to Original Source
Linux

+ - Why the NSA builds its own hardware 1

Submitted by quartertime
quartertime (1764250) writes "Remember Reflections on Trusting Trust, the seminal paper describing how to hide a nearly undetectable backdoor inside the C compiler? A new piece describes how to hide a nearly undetectable backdoor in a PCI card. The mechanism is to install some code in the PCI expansion ROM, which is run as part of
BIOS initialization, which patches the BIOS to patch grub to patch the kernel to insert a remote backdoor. I wonder whether with China's dominance of the computer assembly industry, this method has already been used as part of their espionage efforts? This I think makes clear why the NSA has its own chip fabrication plant."
Security

+ - Why the NSA builds its own hardware

Submitted by quartertime
quartertime (1764250) writes "Remember Reflections on Trusting Trust, the classic paper describing how to hide a nearly undetectable backdoor inside the C compiler? Here's an interesting piece about how to hide a nearly undetectable backdoor inside hardware. The post describes how to install a backdoor in the expansion ROM of a PCI card, which during the boot process patches the BIOS to patch grub to patch the kernel to give the controller remote root access. Because the backdoor is actually housed in the hardware, even if the victim reinstalls the operating from CD, they won't clear out the backdoor. I wonder whether China, with its dominant position in the computer hardware assembly business, has already used this technique for espionage? This perhaps explains why the NSA has its own chip fabrication plant."
Security

+ - Why the NSA builds its own hardware

Submitted by quartertime
quartertime (1764250) writes "Remember Reflections on Trusting Trust, the seminal paper describing how to hide a nearly undetectable backdoor in a compiler? Here's a piece about how to hide a nearly undetectable backdoor in hardware. One can install a backdoor in the expansion ROM of a PCI card, which patches the BIOS to patch grub to patch the kernel to grant the attacker remote root access. Even after the victim reinstalls the operating system from CD, the backdoor will still be there. Given that China builds much of the world's computer hardware, I wonder whether this sort of thing is already part of the Chinese espionage playbook?"
Security

+ - Analysis of a hardware backdoor->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Remember Reflections on Trusting Trust? We know we can't trust our compilers, or our operating systems, or our userspace software. Now even our hardware might be out to get us. This post describes how to install a backdoor in the "expansion ROM" of a PCI card, which patches the BIOS to patch GRUB to patch the Linux kernel to give the controller remote root access. The upshot is that even if the compromise is detected and the victim reinstalls the operating from CD, the backdoor will still be there. Now you know why the NSA builds all its own hardware!"
Link to Original Source

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