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Submission + - Ask Slashdot - Private-cloud file hosting software for linux, like Google Drive?

TarpaKungs writes: I'm Asking Slashdot because I *know* this is a growing problem, but I have failed to find a suitable soution. Here's hoping the collective intelligence of Slashdot will prevail :)

OK — you have lots of android devices and maybe a several Chromebooks: Google Drive is great — it works well, it has user selectable offline caching ("Keep on device") — and most importantly, it handles updates from multiple clients gracefully. The main problem with this is reliability (will the service stay there), security, privacy and cost.

"Cost" because I have several terabytes of data (mostly photos, but a lot of other important files and documents) on an existing linux infrastructure which is well maintained, raid-ed and backed up. A small fraction of this it would be nice to replicate to all my client devices. The rest would be nice just to have on demand, subject to a network connection.

"Privacy and security" because I have lots of data that I don't want to lose control of.

I have been searching for a long time and have yet to find any self hosted software that has the technical abilities of Google Drive or Dropbox. Adding to that, the ability to maintain a secondary sync'd full copy of specific shares on linux (eg on my laptop) would be cool — but not crucial. However a general access linux client is a must.

I'm not looking for the all singing all dancing features of Google Drive such as live spreadsheets in my browser or any of the ancillary features like email and calendars. Simply good honest robust file serving with client offline mode (aka local cached copy, user selectable file by file or folder by folder) and no issues with multiple clients updating files.

I've tried Tonido and Owncloud and neither play nice with POSIX user permissions — they seem to want to own the files and manage access at a server level. Owncloud free seems also to be limited to a single share and enterprise pricing on both products is very high (3 to 4 figures) with no hobbyist/home licensing tier.

Simpler scenarios like SFTP and SMB of course do play nice with the local user permissions, but are not so bright on the client side — ie no offline mode. I did look down the WebDAV route but again, I have failed to find any client apps that are smart about offline mode. I suspect Google and Dropbox add some additional stuff to their protocols to push notifications of changes to other connected clients and also to manage the concept of "who has the latest copy".

So I guess what I am looking for is either a whole server/client suite that works or at least an SFTP/SMB/WebDAV client that is a bit smarter. Here's hoping the collective intelligence of Slashdot will prevail :)

Comment Local newspapers are worth buying (Score 1) 106

I pay for my (weekly) local newspaper. Where my mum lives, they have a weekly print newspaper too, but there it's also available in either a subscription or one-off PDF each week, so sometimes I buy that PDF if there's a story in I want to read, as the local newspapers only sell in a relatively small geographic area. I wish my local paper did PDF too, I'd buy it like that. But, until then, I buy the print version. There's lots to read that you just can't get elsewhere, and the websites for these local papers only report national and regional headlines, they don't put any of the local content on their website at all.

Comment Re:Local newspapers will survive in an online age (Score 1) 106

Exactly. I pay for my (weekly) local newspaper. Where my mum lives, they have a weekly print newspaper too, but there it's also available in either a subscription or one-off PDF each week, so sometimes I buy that PDF if there's a story in I want to read, as the local newspapers only sell in a relatively small geographic area. I wish my local paper did PDF too, I'd buy it like that. But, until then, I buy the print version. There's lots to read that you just can't get elsewhere, and the websites for these local papers only report national and regional headlines, they don't put any of the local content on their website at all.

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