Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?

Comment Re:Unionize (Score 1) 350

We don't need to bring unions in to fleece dues out of everyone, jump in the middle of workplace disputes, destroy advancement based on merit, destroy the incentive to go the extra mile and be a star performer, etc etc. Perhaps if you are a cog turning a screwdriver for a living they are all well and good, but in IT where people work with their minds, it needs to be a creative, innovative, free environment.

Unions didn't kill the motion picture industry.

Comment Re:high HB1 minwage as well maybe even forced OT p (Score 1) 350

These visas are for experts of extraordinary skill, training, and achievement, people who are expensive even when you can find them and recruit them.

The one way that to prove no United States citizens were available for the job: pay twice the prevailing wage. If businesses are willing to do that, then they are bringing in someone they need.

There shoud be a $250,000 salary minimum against a 200%-of-prevailing-wage minimum.

Otherwise, they are separating Americans into spoiled consumers and unemployed workers. It doesn't work, because workers and consumers operate out of the same economic households.

Comment Re:Unionize (Score 1) 350

... most in Congress are more loyal to the executives in the IT industry demanding higher quotas...

In case anyone doubts, as I once did, that Congressperson Gerry Connolly is the outsourcing plant in the Democratic party, I offer the following quote from a recent e-mail to constituents:

"Right now, almost anyone avoid background checks buy purchasing a weapon at a gun show."

Comment Re:All of them are doing this... (Score 1) 151

Also. Microsoft did not exactly get "smacked down" by the Unites States Justice Department for claiming that their browser was integral to the operating system, a claim, Ed Felten disproved in ninety seconds in open court. Unable to win, Microsoft crowbarred the Judge off the case and got his ruling voided.

Also, Microsoft did not develop its own "Office Suite." They bought the number two or number three brand in spreadsheets, in word processing, etc., and warned everybody, especially corporate and government purchasing executives, not to expect competing software to employ the operating system fully.

Comment Re:All of them are doing this... (Score 1) 151

The first monopoly belonged to IBM. Microsoft took it over. IBM had just signed a punishing agreement with the Justice Department, so they could not extend the IBM brand into new territories in their old, less aggressive way.

Microsoft was not so restrained. They obtained code they did not create, wrapped it as their own operating system, sold it to IBM, and muscled their way up from there.

Comment Re:Non-removable apps (Score 1) 151

It happened to Microsoft, it was pretty much the exact same thing there with bundling IE with Windows.

Despite overwhelming evidence, Microsoft attacked the presiding federal judge and got the court decisions steamrolled. In other words, it won a case it should have lost, setting an example for us all.

Comment Re:All of them are doing this... (Score 1) 151

It's not a Google vs. Apple competion thing. It's the small startup in a garage vs. Google thing.

This is a fundamental attack on Android by its monopoly-seeking competitors. The FTC and the Justice Department let Microsoft barge into everyone's applications business thirty-some years ago and since then intellectual property protection services have reduced "anti-trust" to a threat that only corporate lawyers can make and that no corporation, foreign or domestic, has to take seriously.

Apple and Microsoft don't want anyone else collecting screen-rent from every garage.

They want Android, the Google investment, to be free just like the label says, only without a source of payback. Otherwise, what? All licenses for Android voided? Gee, too bad Google couldn't monopolize. Oops, I meant monetize.

Comment Re:Why do this? (Score 1) 112

To put pressure on Apple to lower prices, and on other manufacturers as well.

Consumers did not see the cost of their phones directly, but demanded the best from carriers. Thus they wanted an iPhone first, and their preference in carriers, if any, second. Carriers paid Apple for customers. Apple had a monopoly on the oligopoly.

Comment Re:this is getting old (Score 1) 206

The United States military protects China's freedom to trade worldwide. It does not protect the economic interests of the people of the United States.

U.S. Foreign debt is not like a bank loan. Regarding China, nearly all is held in the form of U.S. governments bonds specified in U.S. currency. The United States will always be able to pay off its dollar obligations and the only factors keeping it from doing so today are anti-inflation policy and trade policies, both of which at this point favor China more than the United States.

The Romans regarded roadways as military structures. China is currently financing a bigger canal from the Pacific to the Atlantic and it would make sense that they would want reliable transoceanic roads to service their outlying colonies in North America.

It's been a long time since the United States military was dedicated to the interests and the security of the U.S. It protects the gobal economy. Any government dominating the global economy gets to set the military agenda of the United States -- among the many ways it gets to influence the federal government.

China does not have to worry about going broke in the process of establishing a worldwide empire. The colonies are there to finance their own colonialization.

Comment Control, not thrift. (Score 1) 420

They don't want efficiency. They want innovation.

They don't want to innovate. They want to control the commercialization of new technologies.

Everybody in charge focuses on control first. Since they don't thoroughly follow what you're doing, they monitor by watching you do it.

They don't want anybody else doing what they do.

The two most common things in the Universe are hydrogen and stupidity. -- Harlan Ellison