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Submission + - First discovery by an @Home project (

pq writes: In a paper published today in Science, astronomers are reporting the discovery of a radio pulsar in data acquired at the world's largest radio telescope and analyzed by hundreds of thousands of volunteers in 192 countries for the Einstein@Home project. This is the first scientific discovery by a distributed computing project, and specific credit is being given to Chris and Helen Colvin of Ames, Iowa, and Daniel Gebhardt of Germany. More at MSNBC etc.

Submission + - replace a freeway bridge in one night (

An anonymous reader writes: In Ottawa tonight a freeway bridge is being ripped out and replaced in one night. A replacement section of the bridge was built in a nearby park, and will be hauled in place with heavy lift equipment, with a projected downtime for the major freeway of less than 24 hours. There is a webcam to watch the progress.

Submission + - End of the World in 2012 ?

sas-dot writes: The NewYork Times sunday magazine carries an interesting article on the Final days of Earth as predicted by Mayan Calendar, which is Dec 21, 2012. From the article i quote "Far from its origins, divorced from its context and enlisted in a prophetic project that it may never have been designed to fulfill, the Mayan calendar is at the center of an escalating cultural phenomenon — with New Age roots — that unites numinous dreams of societal transformation with the darker tropes of biblical cataclysm. To some, 2012 will bring the end of time; to others, it carries the promise of a new beginning; to still others, 2012 provides an explanation for troubling new realities — environmental change, for example — that seem beyond the control of our technology and impervious to reason. Just in time for the final five-year countdown, the Mayan apocalypse has come of age."

Submission + - Amateur astronomers pursue next great discovery

Davemania writes: CNN has an interesting article on how internet has changed amateur astronomy by providing them an ever increasing amount of astronomy data. Following in the footstep of SETI@Home, astronomers and researcher are increasingly enlisting the help of internet users to help them analyze images and data in pursuit of the next major breakthrough. A example of this identified in this article is the Systemic Project that allows enthusiast to look for extrasolar planets.

Anything cut to length will be too short.