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Submission + - Man spanks himself to death

phrackthat writes: Clifford Ray Jones of Detroit died in a Darwin Award worthy fashion. In the ultimate case of distracted driving, he was spanking it to porn on his phone while negotiating a turn on a ramp and rolled his 1996 Toyota. He was partially ejected from his car's sunroof because he wasn't wearing a seat belt. He also wasn't wearing any pants. He died at the scene. Nothing in the story about whether the car was stick(y) shift or automatic. Additional details here.

Comment Trump missed his true calling (Score 1) 875

He should have been a story writer for the Onion. Seriously, this guy is like a walking-talking Mad Lib generator. Some of the weirdest shit comes out of his mouth. Someone should whip together a Trump headline generator that puts out the most over-the-top senseless crap and and auto-post the results to free press release sites. The general press is bound to be fooled by a few of them (Hell, Trump may even adopt a few for himself as campaign positions).

Comment Re:Money isn't enough (Score 2, Insightful) 818

The police don't have to prove that anyone thought it was a bomb. They only have to show that there was probable cause to believe that Ahmed intended for the device to be perceived as a bomb. Given that his sister had been suspended for threatening to blow up the school and Ahmed had been suspended just two days prior at another school and the fact that the clock was not his design and clearly not intended to function as a clock (as the housing, which looked like a briefcase, would keep one from reading the clock face), they should have little to no problem to show probable cause (which under the law is not 51% probability, just a substantial possibility).

Comment Good luck collecting $15 million (Score 1) 818

I don't believe the demand is made in earnest. No one, particularly the law firm representing him, believes that the demand has even a remote relationship to the damages (if any) he may have been perceived to have suffered. It's a publicity stunt - it provides free publicity to a small Texas law firm who may be angling to acquire more Muslim clients and it's a few more minutes of notoriety for Amhed's family (who will probably start another online fundraising efforts to fund the lawsuit).

This kid was sheltered from scrutiny by his family and his parents refused to permit the school to tell its side of the story. Now, the school and the police will be able to get their sides of the story on the record. Plus, I don't think little Ahmed would hold up well in a lengthy deposition or cross-examination by a competent lawyer.

If the school doesn't pay something in "hush money" then the family will eventually dismiss the suit to "spare Ahmed from being re-victimized." Can anyone imagine getting jurors to agree that this wasn't a hoax?

Comment Good luck getting $15 million (Score 1) 2

I don't believe the demand is made in earnest. No rational person, particularly the law firm representing him, believes that the demand has even a remote relationship to the damages (if any) he may have been perceived to have suffered. It's a publicity stunt - it provides free publicity to a small Texas law firm who may be angling to acquire more clients and it's a few more minutes of notoriety for Amhed's family (who will probably start another online fundraising effort to fund the lawsuit).

This kid was sheltered from scrutiny by his family and his parents refused to permit the school to tell its side of the story. Now, the school and the police will be able to get their sides of the story on the record. Plus, I don't think little Ahmed would hold up well in a lengthy deposition or cross-examination by a competent lawyer.

If the school and city doesn't pay something in "hush money" then the family will eventually dismiss the suit to "spare Ahmed from being re-victimized." Can anyone imagine getting jurors to agree that this wasn't a hoax?

Submission + - "Clock boy" threatens to sue city and school if they don't pay him $15 million. 2

phrackthat writes: The family of Ahmed Mohamed, the boy who was arrested in Irving, Texas, when a clock he had went off in school, has threatened to sue the school and the city of Irving, Texas if they do not pay him $15 million as compensation for the supposed indignities he endured when he was arrested.

To refresh the memories of everyone, Ahmed's clock was a clock he disassembled then put into a pencil case that looked like a miniature briefcase. He was briefly detained by the Irving city police to interview him and determine if he intended for his clock to be perceived as a fake bomb. He was released to his parents later on that day and they publicized the matter and claimed Ahmed was arrested because of "Islamophobia".

Comment Hard cases make bad laws (Score 1) 108

It's often said that "Hard cases make bad laws", but our narrow rules pertaining to standing to challenge an unconstitutional law make sure that only hard cases will be heard. Evidence obtained from illegally intercepting communications under FISA won't be used against the average Joe or even against the low level criminal (we have Parallel Construction for that. In the end, the truly bad laws can only be challenged by the most despised people - terrorists, crime lords, drug kingpins, etc. When that happens the judge will be thinking two things - 1. I can't let this scumbag get off on a technicality and 2. If I follow the constitution and this guy walks then I'll never be appointed to a higher court or find a job in the private sector if I ever decide to leave the bench.

The narrow rules on standing present a structural obstacle to challenging bad laws and all three branches of the government like it that way.

Comment Re:One of the probs with weeding out the intellige (Score 1) 113

Many police forces conduct a form of intelligence testing as part of the hiring process. If you are too intelligent then you will be booted because they think that police work will be too boring for you and you'll quit. The police departments across the land provide much of the "talent" pool for the FBI, DOJ, DEA and other three letter agencies which naturally leads to the three letter agencies brimming with fools.

It would be more accurate to say that you read about the New London, Connecticut police department and extrapolated from that one case to "many".

In truth, I had heard of this from HR personnel and officers in the LAPD, Sacramento and Seattle PD as well as from corrections departments as far back as the early 90s when I applied. Additionally, the written tests included very obvious personality and IQ testing. The New London case merely brought it out in the public light.

Comment One of the probs with weeding out the intelligent (Score 2) 113

Many police forces conduct a form of intelligence testing as part of the hiring process. If you are too intelligent then you will be booted because they think that police work will be too boring for you and you'll quit. The police departments across the land provide much of the "talent" pool for the FBI, DOJ, DEA and other three letter agencies which naturally leads to the three letter agencies brimming with fools.

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