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Comment Re:You don't say... (Score 1) 606

Are you saying they should do nothing, and hand out degrees to these kids, sending them into the world thinking that this sort of behavior will always be tolerated everywhere they go? Because that would be setting them up for failure, giving them the wrong idea of how society works, and thus not doing their jobs as educators.

Comment People Who Don't Get Over Those Old Games... (Score 4, Interesting) 157

actually exist. As an OpenTTD player, active that is, I can tell you that for some the fun of old games doesn't ever really go away. In the intervening decades since the original TTD, the community has actually advanced the game play well beyond what the creator was aiming at. If only graphics weren't so expensive to produce (time or otherwise), I think we'd see a major improvement on that too. But as I said, I'm an active player. There are similar communities, like the ones around Age of Empires 2 and Rise of Nations. The former seems to have a lot more success doing mods. This would be really, really awesome for games like Rise of Nations. I think it's a legitimate request even in the eyes of the copyright holders. In this case they've actively decided not to profit from the games online anymore. Users with legitimate rights (ie, purchased) should be free at least to keep their software functioning properly. The case could eventually gaslight the whole update scam some parts of the industry have been running for a long time. I'm not saying that someone should sanely be using software from the 1990s or anything, I'm just saying that they should have the right to try if they paid for the software. Similar to how you should not be limited on the number of devices you can sync a digital goods store to (if you violate the agreement in other ways, that's another issue, and arbitrary device limits are another way of forcing people to spend more money in some cases). In summary: fuck yeah.

Submission + - Georgia Institute of Technology Researchers Bridge the Airgap ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: Hacked has a piece about Georgia Institute of Technology Researchers keylogging from a distance using the electromagnetic radiation of CPUs. They can reportedly do this from up to 6 meters away. In this video, using two Ubuntu laptops, they demonstrate that keystrokes are easily interpreted with the software they have developed. In their whitepaper they talk about the need for more research in this area so that hardware and software manufacturers will be able to develop more secure devices. For now, Farraday cages don't seem as crazy as they used to, or do they?

"Anyone attempting to generate random numbers by deterministic means is, of course, living in a state of sin." -- John Von Neumann