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Comment: Re:Article is totally misleading (Score 1) 269

by ph0rk (#47883821) Attached to: Massive Study Searching For Genes Behind Intelligence Finds Little
No, because cognitive ability is still highly heritable in behavior genetic work (think twin studies). Candidate gene studies (the tradition GWAS grew out of) tends to have null results because there are thousands of genes related to cognitive abilities, and they likely do not work in a simple additive way (think necessary and sufficient conditions).

So, while I would certainly agree that candidate gene studies are unlikely to find a "smart" gene or genes, this statement:

so there is something much more important than genetics in determining IQ.

doesn't quite follow from these results.

Comment: Re:classroom tools (Score 1) 210

by ph0rk (#45722537) Attached to: Datawind Not Blowing Smoke: $38 Tablet Coming To the US

Graduate students and professors need to "publish or perish". I'm hoping that at least some of them will use at least some of their publishing time to write free textbooks.

It is unlikely that a free textbook (or any textbook, really) will count for tenure, in either the social or physical sciences, barring very high level technical textbooks.

So, yes, they would be wasting their time unless already well established. That rules out grad students and early career professors.

Comment: Re:Apple made the same mistake (Score 2) 390

by ph0rk (#45298927) Attached to: Smartphone Sales: Apple Squeezed, Blackberry Squashed, Android 81.3%

However, people are getting more educated and tech-savvy in general.

That is false: familiarity with facebook does not mean tech-savvy.

A surprising portion of even the very best and brightest 18-22 year olds would still hold a floppy disk completely level if you told them the bits might fall off.

Comment: Re:Apple made the same mistake (Score 2) 390

by ph0rk (#45298909) Attached to: Smartphone Sales: Apple Squeezed, Blackberry Squashed, Android 81.3%
It has always seemed to me that an iPhone only really made sense if you were already an almost completely Apple shop. If you already use OSX everywhere, have a few apple TVs or airport speakers lying around, an iPhone is tops for integration.

I've never understood why anyone would buy one that didn't already have at least one OSX machine.

Comment: Re:Med students (Score 1) 446

by ph0rk (#43824845) Attached to: Med Students Unaware of Their Bias Against Obese Patients

Even if X is often correlated with Y, it doesn't justify the assumption that X always implies Y.

While that is true, the safe bet is still going to be that X implies Y.

If the first premise is true (X is highly correlated with Y), then to expect Y when one finds X is only natural (and takes less processing time).

Now, if we had some clear cases where X doesn't lead to Y, for example when Z is present, then we can solve the problem of unfairly expecting Y by also looking for Z. Hunting for Z will probably be more fruitful in the long run than trying to train people to ignore stereotypes that have evidentiary support.

What's the difference between a computer salesman and a used car salesman? A used car salesman knows when he's lying.

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