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Comment: Re:It didn't matter whether it was last year or ne (Score 1) 236

by petermgreen (#46829385) Attached to: ARIN Is Down To the Last<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/8 of IPv4 Addresses

Making IPv6 work is basically their only option.

Trouble is "Making IPv6 work" requires other people to deploy it. I dunno what things are like where you live but here in the UK the only access providers that offer IPv6 connectivity are the boutique ones.

Comment: Re:Overhead *should* be small. (Score 2) 183

by petermgreen (#46825951) Attached to: How Much Data Plan Bandwidth Is Wasted By DRM?

It's not the direct overhead of the DRM, it's the way the drm is structured forcing the user to do things less efficiently. If the drm system only allows streaming then you have to push the data over whatever network you have at the time and place you want to watch and if you want to watch it more than once you have to push the data multiple times.

Without drm you can just download it once on the most economical connection you have available.

Comment: Re:Not sure how I feel about this one (Score 4, Informative) 293

by petermgreen (#46825577) Attached to: Aereo To SCOTUS: Shut Us Down and You Shut Down Cloud Storage

If Aereo wins, the cable companies would be able to save money by erecting Aereo-style antenna arrays for their cable feeds, bypassing payments to the networks.

I doubt it, Aereo's legal position relies on one antenna per user. That also means one data stream per user.

So switching to doing things aereo style would require a cable company to massively re-engineer things.

Comment: Re:We are not anywhere near running out of address (Score 1) 236

by petermgreen (#46825297) Attached to: ARIN Is Down To the Last<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/8 of IPv4 Addresses

If you go by http://ipv4auctions.bstocksolu... a /8 is worth roughly USD 100M.

This assumes that either the seller is allowed to split the block or the price per IP for a /8 is comparable to the price per IP for a /8 block is comparable to the price per IP for the much smaller blocks you see sold on that site.

Comment: Re:Wasn't allocation always the problem? (Score 1) 236

by petermgreen (#46825229) Attached to: ARIN Is Down To the Last<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/8 of IPv4 Addresses

With IPv6 they are trying to allocate blocks in such a way that they almost never have to give a network a second block that is not continguous with it's initial block. So it should hopefully convege much closer to one block per multihomed network than IPv4 has.

Still the number of multihomed networks is only going to grow over time and whatever you do each such network is going to want at least one entry in the global routing table.

Comment: Re:Wasn't allocation always the problem? (Score 1) 236

by petermgreen (#46824845) Attached to: ARIN Is Down To the Last<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/8 of IPv4 Addresses

ie it would take MIT 5 years to re-engineer their network to free up say half of their allocation

I call BS, it would only take that long if it was a low priority job. If they were told in no uncertain terms to sort it out or be kicked out of the internet I'm sure they could deal with it much quicker than that.

Comment: Re:We are not anywhere near running out of address (Score 1) 236

by petermgreen (#46824785) Attached to: ARIN Is Down To the Last<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/8 of IPv4 Addresses

Why would you choose that option when we have a way of bypassing it?

Because people will do what is individally best for them, not what is best for the community as a whole.

If I want to run a server for the general public to access over the internet it needs to have an IPv4 address until such time as the vast majority of clients can reliablly access IPv6 servers (I would not consider teredo to be "reliable", it's overcomplicated and fights against NAT rather than working with it).

Similarly if I want my users to be able to access resources on the public internet I need IPv4 addresses for the intent side of my nat boxes until such time as the vast majority of servers are available on IPv6.

If I deploy IPv6 it will not change whether those systems need IPv4 addresses. To do that requires OTHER PEOPLE to deploy IPv6 which they are often unintertested in doing.

Comment: Re:It didn't matter whether it was last year or ne (Score 1) 236

by petermgreen (#46824665) Attached to: ARIN Is Down To the Last<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/8 of IPv4 Addresses

so we have another 5 years of eking out of old order before people REALLY have to take notice.

Possiblly much more than that.

XP and andriod 2.x are dying. They aren't dead yet but in a few years time their relavence will likely have declined to the level where website operators think it reasonable to stop supporting their default browsers. Once that happens we will be able to use SNI (and tell the holdouts still on XP to "use firefox or chrome damnit")

Once that happens it will be possible to put multiple SSL websites behind one IP reducing the IP demand on the hosting side. With end lusers put behind CGN, SSL web hosting running multiple sites per IP and basic VM hosting using front end load balancers to let them share IPv4 IPs it should be possible to keep IPv4 going for a long time.

One interesting question is what price will IPv4 addresses reach, currently it seems to vary from about $7-$25 per address depending on block size (http://ipv4auctions.bstocksolutions.com/)

Comment: Re:Hmm... (Score 1) 236

by petermgreen (#46824519) Attached to: ARIN Is Down To the Last<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/8 of IPv4 Addresses

I suspect the former.

ISPs NEED to provide their customers with the ability to access resources on the IPv4 internet from end devices that only support IPv4. For most ISPs (massive ones that have problems with running out of private v4 space excepted) who can't give all their customers public IPs the easiest way to achive that will be to deploy NAT44. Once they have deployed the NAT44 there is no real pressure to get arround to deploying IPv6 as well.

Some ISPs may consider building a v6 only access network and using ds-lite instead of using traditional NAT44. There are certainly advantages to that approach but I suspect it will be the exception rather than the rule and mostly seen with ISPs who are building new networks from scratch.

We may see some NAT64 (especially on mobile) but as well as philosophical objections (messing with dns) it has the big problem that it can't support v4 only client devices.

Comment: Re:Pulling him over (Score 1) 407

by petermgreen (#46823617) Attached to: Supreme Court OKs Stop and Search Based On Anonymous 911 Tips

The bigger question is was this "anonymous caller" a real member of the public reporting a real crime or was it a cop laundering illegally obtained evidence.

A key principal of the US legal system is that if the cops break the law while obtaining evidence the evidence so-obtained and anything derived from it is thrown out. The idea of this is to keep the police following the law. The problem is that rather than actually follow the law the cops and spooks engage in "paralell construction" where illegal evidence is used to decide who to target but a "clean" chain of evidence is built up later to justify the arrest.

Comment: Re:What's the cost to use a real rng vs psudo (Score 1) 86

There are a couple of issues with hardware RNGs

1: Pretty much every hardware RNG will have biases in the output. So you still tend to end up needing a prng-like layer to clean things up.
2: If the RNG is integrated into a processor or similar (which is the only way it will gain mass deployment) then it raises the question of whether you trust the processor vendor to implement it properly and without the influence of the spooks. The more paranoid members of the crypto community don't trust hardware vendors that much.

Comment: Re:THROUGH North Korea?! (Score 1) 234

by petermgreen (#46798801) Attached to: Russia Writes Off 90 Percent of North Korea Debt

Even if it does happen that they cut it off from time to time the pipeline may still be valuable to russia. If russia has multiple export routes to/via different countries then the impact of any one route being cut (for example exports to europe could potentially be cut off by sanctions over the ukraine situation) is reduced.

"If that makes any sense to you, you have a big problem." -- C. Durance, Computer Science 234

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