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Comment: Re:Phones (Score 0, Troll) 144

by petehead (#27330645) Attached to: All Five Smartphones Survive Pwn2Own Contest

A quick Google Pulled up the Phones as: Phones (and associated test platform) * Blackberry(TBA)
* Android(Dev G1)
* iPhone(locked 2.0)
* Nokia/Symbian(N95-1)
* Windows Mobile (HTC Touch)

I have the HTC Touch. It has a built in security feature: It will crash whatever you are running to try to exploit it. If anyone here figures out how to exploit it, please tell Microsoft. Not so that they will patch it, but so they can use it as an example to developers for how to code.

Comment: Re:Let her know what you think! (Score 3, Interesting) 873

by petehead (#26815681) Attached to: Senator Diane Feinstein Trying to Kill Net Neutrality

...let her know that you will definitely not vote for her again...

She'll be 79 years old when her current term ends. I don't know that she cares about future votes. And by the way, how many 75 year olds do you know that you would feel comfortable dealing with all of these issues?

Comment: Re:So.. (Score 5, Insightful) 282

by petehead (#26646685) Attached to: Cox Communications and "Congestion Management"

I'm no more interested in the quality of another customer's service with this product than any other -- when I go out to eat, I'm not going to let them overcook my steak to be sure they get your souffle just right. Why should this be different?

They didn't sell you a steak and me a souffle. They sold us both a buffet. All of the other customers get their food as normal, but I'm a big fat guy. Instead of taking my plate, sitting down, and eating, I stay up at the buffet and eat there without even putting the food on my plate. I'm in the way of others trying to get food and eating most of it myself. Now the management is going to make me get in line to eat rather than stay at the buffet.

If you want your steak, you've got to get a dedicated line.

P.S. Hometown Buffet is gross.

Comment: Re:Waiting.. (Score 1) 449

by petehead (#26625303) Attached to: Apple Awarded Patent For iPhone Interface

Just as an example: I'll bet Apple patented the magnetic cord of the MacBook

US patent application number 11/876,733 filed October 22 2007.

And lets look at what happened with that. My girlfriend left her charger at home on a trip so we were going to get a new one. Come to find out that they cost $80. $80.00! For a charger! And of course, there are no other options. Keep in mind that this $80 charger has ratings of 1.5/5 (60W) and 2/5 (80W) on Apple's own webstore.

Television

+ - New Energy Efficiency Rules for TVs Sold in CA

Submitted by petehead
petehead (1041740) writes "The LA Times reports on regulations expected to pass in 2009 that will not allow energy inefficient TVs to be sold in the state. "State regulators are getting ready to curb the growing power gluttony of TV sets by drafting the nation's first rules requiring retailers to sell only the most energy-efficient models, starting in 2011... The regulations would be phased in over two years, with a first tier taking effect on Jan. 1, 2011, and a more stringent, second tier on Jan. 1, 2013. Purchasers of Tier 1-compliant TVs would shave an average of $18.48 off their residential electric bill in the first year of ownership, the Energy Commission estimates. Tier 2 sets would save an additional $11.76 a year...The Consumer Electronics Assn. presented three scenarios to the commission, showing 10%, 20% and 30% drops in product availability and each of their potential financial effects.""
Image

How To Cut In Line and Not Get Caught 256

Posted by samzenpus
from the no-cuts dept.
ewenc writes "A psychology study of hundreds of people waiting for front-row access to U2 concerts points to the best ways to cut in line and not get caught. 'Super-fans' are most irked by queue-jumpers. People were equally peeved whether someone cut in front or behind, and cutters who jumped beside a friend were less likely to attract scorn."
Medicine

Stretching Before Exercising Weakens Muscles 339

Posted by kdawson
from the everything-you-know-is-wrong dept.
Khemisty writes "Back in grade school you were probably taught the importance of warm-up exercises, and it's likely you've continued with pretty much the same routine ever since. Science, however, has moved on. Researchers now believe that some of the more entrenched elements of many athletes' warm-up regimens are not only a waste of time but are actually bad for you. The old presumption that holding a stretch for 20 to 30 seconds — known as static stretching — primes muscles for a workout is dead wrong. It actually weakens them. In a recent study conducted at the University of Nevada, athletes generated less force from their leg muscles after static stretching than they did after not stretching at all. Other studies have found that this stretching decreases muscle strength by as much as 30 percent. Also, stretching one leg's muscles can reduce strength in the other leg as well, probably because the central nervous system rebels against the movements."
Space

First Images From 50-km Enceladus Flyby 95

Posted by kdawson
from the over-the-shoulder-spinning dept.
CheshireCatCO writes "The first pictures from yesterday's flyby of Enceladus are now public. At closest approach, Cassini was set spinning to cancel out the apparent motion of Enceladus so as to capture unsmeared images during the 40,000-mph flyby. Although it wasn't clear that this would work (errors in pointing could easily have made the cameras miss their targets), the maneuver panned out beautifully, producing spectacular images of the surface. Images show the 'tiger stripes' at the south pole, including at least one location that has been identified as a source of a jet, as well as considerable vertical relief, easily visible thanks to the low sun-angle near the south pole at present. Processed, enhanced images should follow shortly."
Data Storage

How To Use a Terabyte of RAM 424

Posted by kdawson
from the every-factor-of-25-helps dept.
Spuddly writes with links to Daniel Philips and his work on the Ramback patch, and an analysis of it by Jonathan Corbet up on LWN. The experimental new design for Linux's virtual memory system would turn a large amount of system RAM into a fast RAM disk with automatic sync to magnetic media. We haven't yet reached a point where systems, even high-end boxes, come with a terabyte of installed memory, but perhaps it's not too soon to start thinking about how to handle that much memory.

"Out of register space (ugh)" -- vi

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