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Comment: Re:Hulk hogan could code too (Score 1) 578

by pepty (#46731785) Attached to: Michael Bloomberg: You Can't Teach a Coal Miner To Code

Wow, the economy must be recovering like crazy if the McDs and Walmarts are on such a hiring spree!

Not the good king of crazy though. The middle class jobs that were lost during the recession aren't being replaced with new ones, instead there has been an increase in new low wage jobs. Who is going to buy all of the fancy embossed hand crafted leather kindle covers?

Everyone I know who uses maids and gardners, the "landscaping company" is a half-dozen recent immigrants, one of whom owns the company. Maid services are similar. These are small businesses, with successful owners.

Odd. Upthread you said gardeners and maids are making $50 per hour. One comment later and it's only the people who own the landscaping or housekeeping company who make that, the rest are borderline impoverished. Successful owners with borderline impoverished employees. Um, hooray? Is that the model for our new economy?

But in any case, you can certainly live on $20/yr - I've done it. Living like a student with roommates and cheap everything, but sometimes that's life.

Yep sometimes life means not being able provide for your kid. Or being able to save for retirement. It's not just twentysomethings stuck in these jobs.

Comment: Re:Read the article. (Score 1) 136

by pepty (#46731589) Attached to: Crowd Wisdom Better At Predictions Than Top CIA Analysts

"What is the chance that North Korea will launch a multi-stage missile before June 2015?" People enter a guessed % of probability. They get 3000 random people to respond. People's guesses are wildly all over the place. However. . .

When you average out all those responses, the resulting number is spooky accurate. So-called, "Wisdom of the crowd."

Luck has both nothing, and everything to do with it.

How can a probability be spooky accurate when it is in reference to a singular event that can't be repeated over and over again?

Comment: Re:Hulk hogan could code too (Score 1) 578

by pepty (#46729881) Attached to: Michael Bloomberg: You Can't Teach a Coal Miner To Code

There are very few such jobs.

There are a huge number of those jobs, and they are increasing all the time. The living wage is typically 3-7 dollars higher than the minimum wage, depending on the local cost of lliving.

Look into how much a maid or gardener makes per hour.

OK. Maids and housekeepers : $10.22 per hour median. Gardeners: $11.51 median. (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013

Most are self-employed or small businesses doing very well (depends on where you live, but paying ~$50/hour isn't uncommon).

Wages at 90th percentile: maids and housekeepers: $15.34, gardeners: $18.38. You may pay $50 to have your lawn mowed, but it's doubtful that anyone involved earns $50 per hour/$100k per year unless it's the owner of the landscaping company.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 111

by pepty (#46728225) Attached to: $250K Reward Offered In California Power Grid Attack

TV news is generally forgettable, but two TV news reports from the '90s really stood out for me:

1. After a series of brush fires considered likely to be arson, a reporter stood in front of a canyon, named the location, and reported the fire dept was saying it would be particularly dangerous if someone started a fire in this canyon or others similar to it, because of reasons X, Y, and Z ...

2. After several kids were hospitalized after ingesting jimson weed tea, the news report warned kids not to make jimson weed tea by showing pictures of jimson weed, talking about where it typically grows, which parts of the weed are used, and then saying the side effects include hallucinating for days.

Comment: Re:Level of public funding ? (Score 2) 292

by pepty (#46722029) Attached to: Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

curve which approaches a line asymptotically will make its big progress early (taking t as the horizontal axis) and small gains afterward. It will still get closer, but not in a way that makes a big change.

That probably makes the most sense for fields that address things like Grand Unified Theory/ Theory of Everything in physics. In fields where the goal for the most part is technology (chemistry,biology, solid state physics) the curve isn't approaching an asymptote, at least not anytime soon.

Comment: Re:so what.... (Score 1) 77

by pepty (#46687885) Attached to: 3D-Printed UAV Can Go From Atoms to Airborne in 24 Hours
The posed challenge was "When they can print a motor and power supply", not "when will it make sense to print a motor and power supply". In this case, if you can make a proof of principle speaker, you can make a proof of principle radial motor, neither of which will probably be very practical. One coil, no bearings is enough to make it spin (til the plastic bits melt/wear out).

Comment: Re:so what.... (Score 1) 77

by pepty (#46687559) Attached to: 3D-Printed UAV Can Go From Atoms to Airborne in 24 Hours

You're delusional. You have no idea if that speaker's performance even comes close to the performance of a dollar store speaker, how much it cost, how long it took to print and what its useful lifespan is.

More like you're too lazy to read to the end of a comment:

How good a motor and a PSU you can print and how many different printers it would take to make all of the components are other questions.

I have no problems discerning between a proof of concept and a viable commercial device/ viable commercial process. If you wanted to specify the latter, you should have done so in your posed challenge instead of getting snippy later on.

And printing transistors? That's so far away from anything that's even remotely possible, I'm speechless.

You don't get out much, do you?

Fully Printed, High Performance Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors on Flexible Substrates

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nl401934a

Lucent started printing transistors in the '90s. PARC and their partners are developing printed memory, transistors, and sensors as commercial products.

Do you have any inkling of a clue of the material purity required and cleanliness and precision required? Jesus Christ!

Yes I do: very litte. A transistor is DIY at home if you are making them big and primitive, which is sufficient to answer the question you asked. You don't have to make a CPU or mosfets by the truckload to make a single power supply.

Comment: Re:so what.... (Score 1, Informative) 77

by pepty (#46680271) Attached to: 3D-Printed UAV Can Go From Atoms to Airborne in 24 Hours

airframes are trivial. When they can print a motor and power supply, then maybe they'll have something

They can print copper and silver wire, as well as strontium ferrite magnets. Switching from a linear motor (the 3D printed speaker below) to a rotary motor wouldn't be difficult.

http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2013/12/fully-functional-loudspeaker-3-d-printed

A PSU ... capacitors, resistors, semiconductors, induction coils, and transistors can all be printed. How good a motor and a PSU you can print and how many different printers it would take to make all of the components are other questions.

Comment: Re:Ethics is Relative. PERIOD. (Score 1) 402

by pepty (#46669955) Attached to: NASA Can't Ethically Send Astronauts On One-Way Missions To Deep Space
My thoughts are more along the lines of: selling a good lie doesn't make the goal worth the costs. I'd also say there's a big difference between high risk and planned death. A mission without plans for supplies continuing indefinitely or a way back is a suicide mission; a plan that exposes astronauts to a sievert of radiation and engineering mishaps is a high risk one. It's the difference between Kamikazes and the Doolittle (Tokyo bombing) raid.

Comment: Re:Ethics is Relative. PERIOD. (Score 1) 402

by pepty (#46669683) Attached to: NASA Can't Ethically Send Astronauts On One-Way Missions To Deep Space
Yep. And sending the first robot out, running into difficulties, sending out the improved robot, having it fail to deploy, sending out the replacement, realizing there are new problems you want to address, and sending out a new type of robot would still be faster than planning and sending a manned mission. It would also be cheaper, so you could send some robots to Europa and Enceladus too. Why wait til a ~2035 manned mission to learn stuff we could be learning about via robot this decade?

Those who can, do; those who can't, simulate.

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