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Comment: Re:re; You Should? (Score 2, Insightful) 454

by pepty (#46820139) Attached to: The US Public's Erratic Acceptance of Science
The Big Bang question actually conflates 2 questions: "did the universe start with a Big Bang?", and "was it 13.8 billion years ago?" Hell, I would have answered "somewhat confident" to that question because I didn't remember off the top of my head what the current estimate for the age of the universe is.

Comment: Re:TSA-like Money for Fear (Score 1) 270

by pepty (#46820047) Attached to: Expert Warns: Civilian World Not Ready For Massive EMP-Caused Blackout

tests have been done; ECUs did fail and required a reset (disconnecting from the battery) before the car was driveable again.

http://www.futurescience.com/e...

We tested a sample of 37 cars in an EMP simulation laboratory, with automobile vintages ranging from 1986 through 2002. Automobiles of these vintages include extensive electronics and represent a significant fraction of automobiles on the road today. The testing was conducted by exposing running and nonrunning automobiles to sequentially increasing EMP field intensities. If anomalous response (either temporary or permanent) was observed, the testing of that particular automobile was stopped. If no anomalous response was observed, the testing was continued up to the field intensity limits of the simulation capability (approximately 50 kV/m). Automobiles were subjected to EMP environments under both engine turned off and engine turned on conditions. No effects were subsequently observed in those automobiles that were not turned on during EMP exposure. The most serious effect observed on running automobiles was that the motors in three cars stopped at field strengths of approximately 30 kV/m or above. In an actual EMP exposure, these vehicles would glide to a stop and require the driver to restart them. Electronics in the dashboard of one automobile were damaged and required repair. Other effects were relatively minor. . Twenty-five automobiles exhibited malfunctions that could be considered only a nuisance (e.g., blinking dashboard lights) and did not require driver intervention to correct. Eight of the 37 cars tested did not exhibit any anomalous response. Based on these test results, we expect few automobile effects at EMP field levels below 25 kV/m. Approximately 10 percent or more of the automobiles exposed to higher field levels may experience serious EMP effects, including engine stall, that require driver intervention to correct. We further expect that at least two out of three automobiles on the road will manifest some nuisance response at these higher field levels. The serious malfunctions could trigger car crashes on U.S. highways; the nuisance malfunctions could exacerbate this condition. The ultimate result of automobile EMP exposure could be triggered crashes that damage many more vehicles than are damaged by the EMP, the consequent loss of life, and multiple injuries.

Comment: Re:TSA-like Money for Fear (Score 1) 270

by pepty (#46809013) Attached to: Expert Warns: Civilian World Not Ready For Massive EMP-Caused Blackout

Let's assume that it even is possible to maintain control, and glide the plane to some sort of impromptu landing (I don't think it is), this area is so densely populated, anywhere they land, they WILL land on people.

Well if it's like that show Revolution where everything electronic fails utterly and completely all at once, the airplanes will pinwheel out of the sky - with their electronic running lights still lit. Cause it looks cooler that way.

Comment: Re:TSA-like Money for Fear (Score 1) 270

by pepty (#46808969) Attached to: Expert Warns: Civilian World Not Ready For Massive EMP-Caused Blackout

It only takes one explosion. That isn't a nuclear Armageddon. It is returning a major post-industrial computer based society to a horse and wagon based economy in seconds, without having the horses and wagons to do the work not to mention the computers, computer controlled vehicles (engines), and other electronics.

Almost all cars that weren't actually driving at the time would survive an EMP just fine. The most common repair would just be disconnecting the battery for a few seconds.

Comment: Re:TSA-like Money for Fear (Score 2) 270

by pepty (#46808905) Attached to: Expert Warns: Civilian World Not Ready For Massive EMP-Caused Blackout
tests have been done; ECUs did fail and required a reset (disconnecting from the battery) before the car was driveable again.

http://www.futurescience.com/emp/vehicles.html

We tested a sample of 37 cars in an EMP simulation laboratory, with automobile vintages ranging from 1986 through 2002. Automobiles of these vintages include extensive electronics and represent a significant fraction of automobiles on the road today. The testing was conducted by exposing running and nonrunning automobiles to sequentially increasing EMP field intensities. If anomalous response (either temporary or permanent) was observed, the testing of that particular automobile was stopped. If no anomalous response was observed, the testing was continued up to the field intensity limits of the simulation capability (approximately 50 kV/m). Automobiles were subjected to EMP environments under both engine turned off and engine turned on conditions. No effects were subsequently observed in those automobiles that were not turned on during EMP exposure. The most serious effect observed on running automobiles was that the motors in three cars stopped at field strengths of approximately 30 kV/m or above. In an actual EMP exposure, these vehicles would glide to a stop and require the driver to restart them. Electronics in the dashboard of one automobile were damaged and required repair. Other effects were relatively minor. . Twenty-five automobiles exhibited malfunctions that could be considered only a nuisance (e.g., blinking dashboard lights) and did not require driver intervention to correct. Eight of the 37 cars tested did not exhibit any anomalous response. Based on these test results, we expect few automobile effects at EMP field levels below 25 kV/m. Approximately 10 percent or more of the automobiles exposed to higher field levels may experience serious EMP effects, including engine stall, that require driver intervention to correct. We further expect that at least two out of three automobiles on the road will manifest some nuisance response at these higher field levels. The serious malfunctions could trigger car crashes on U.S. highways; the nuisance malfunctions could exacerbate this condition. The ultimate result of automobile EMP exposure could be triggered crashes that damage many more vehicles than are damaged by the EMP, the consequent loss of life, and multiple injuries.

Comment: Re:"beofuels from corn" is not just stupid (Score 1) 158

by pepty (#46803097) Attached to: Biofuels From Corn Can Create More Greenhouse Gases Than Gasoline

But I have measured that I get AT LEAST 10% less millage in my 2013 Mazda on gasoline diluted with alcohol than I do with pure gasoline.

Assuming that's true: is it likely to be due to the way the ECU and the emissions system treat the ethanol/fuel mix? Lots of cars are optimized for lowest production of NOx, carbon monoxide, etc, as opposed to highest efficiency. Just an example: the PZEV version of my Mazda gets 10% less HP and torque than the same car with the then standard (non California) emissions package.

Comment: Re:So - who's in love with the government again? (Score 2) 396

by pepty (#46798021) Attached to: Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon
I read TFA. You're assuming the breweries would actually follow through with that, as opposed to dumping or finding some other taker for the spent grain (compost, etc). If they dump it the loss of revenue and cost of disposal might amount to ... 3 cents per sixpack. Does that sound like a beer price crisis on the horizon to you?

TFA also mentions that the price of dairy products would rise due to the farmers having to pay more for feed.

Yup. That's why I said the price of feed would go up.

Comment: Re:So - who's in love with the government again? (Score 3, Insightful) 396

by pepty (#46796303) Attached to: Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon
How about reading more than the headline and the comments to see if the government has a point?

FDA rule would require brewers and distillers to keep extensive records to allow for traceability in the event of a problem, and to adopt new safety procedures, for example by storing and shipping spent grain in closed sanitized containers.

Is that really so unreasonable? If records aren't kept there's a chance problems have been missed. And oh, the horror of having to ship animal food in containers that have actually been cleaned.

Luck, that's when preparation and opportunity meet. -- P.E. Trudeau

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