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Comment: Re:Sulfur (Score 1) 81

by pepty (#49160449) Attached to: Craig Brittain (Revenge Porn King) Sues For Use of Image

It is generally well established that correspondence between two individuals is private and that for one of the parties to share that correspondence it is considered appropriate to ask the other for permission prior to sharing.

Isn't that consideration based on the assumption that the individuals have a long term private relationship, something that would lead to an expectation of privacy? Letters to a casual acquaintance wouldn't fall under that rule, would they? How about selfies sent by someone being flirtatious with someone they don't know very well yet?

Comment: Re:Easy life (Score 1) 145

by pepty (#49160411) Attached to: Research Suggests That Saunas Help You Live Longer
Pick your definition for empiricism. In modern science (my experience is protein structure prediction) it involves calculating average parameters from large datasets (empirical: CHARMM, AMBER) as opposed to generating them ab initio (theoretical: Hartree-Fock). It certainly doesn't involve cherry picking anecdotes from websites that hawk anti-aging supplements.

Comment: Re:Easy life (Score 1) 145

by pepty (#49160089) Attached to: Research Suggests That Saunas Help You Live Longer

Yes really. Anecdotal evidence is still evidence.

tend to prefer empiricism and general pattern-recognition to theory-directed research because in the area of health it is so fraught with false positives, statistical failures, presuppositions and downright fraud due to industry influence.

So your answer to the problems of false positives and statistical failures are studies where n = 1.

Ok.

Comment: Re:The wrong conclusion was drawn (Score 2) 145

by pepty (#49159481) Attached to: Research Suggests That Saunas Help You Live Longer

The wrong conclusion was drawn from this observational study. Saunas are very stressful. People who are weak can not tolerate many saunas and therefore avoid them. Healthy people don't have a problem with them and take more of them.

Meanwhile, in the actual article:

After adjustment for CVD risk factors ...

Comment: Re:Easy life (Score 1) 145

by pepty (#49159405) Attached to: Research Suggests That Saunas Help You Live Longer

Completely missed the point of my post:

How do you establish the control group: people who could keep running but choose not to? Otherwise you are conflating the benefits of not being at risk for arthritis, tendinosis, vertabrae/disk issuses, torn meniscus, etc. with the benefits of exercise.

It's just as true for weight training.

Plus: anecdotes?

Really?

Comment: Re:Sulfur (Score 1) 81

by pepty (#49159113) Attached to: Craig Brittain (Revenge Porn King) Sues For Use of Image
Tangential but relevant: You take a picture and send it to someone. Or write a letter and send it to someone. What conditions have to be met before there is a legal expectation of confidentiality for that someone? Written contract? Verbal contract? Can just having an intimate relationship create the contract? Can the nature of the picture/letter alone create that contract?

Can someone with a legal background connect the dots for me?

Comment: Re:Easy life (Score 4, Insightful) 145

by pepty (#49159015) Attached to: Research Suggests That Saunas Help You Live Longer

And we're not talking about those painful last 5 years where you can't do anything, but 5 years of vitality to your productive mid-life.

Cite? I'm genuinely curious. The trick is finding research that is based on intervention, not just observation. For example: studies of runners. People who are still running at age 55+ have been intensively selected by their joints over the years, many people will have experienced knee/hip/ankle/back problems well before that age and quit. How do you establish the control group: people who could keep running but choose not to? Otherwise you are conflating the benefits of not being at risk for arthritis, tendinosis, vertabrae/disk issuses, torn meniscus, etc. with the benefits of exercise.

Comment: Re:Because Bureaucracy, stupid. (Score 1) 243

by pepty (#49144393) Attached to: The Peculiar Economics of Developing New Antibiotics
You are aiming at the wrong target. It's not some sort of zero sum game where spending more on physician samples or TV ads means spending less on R&D. Each dollar spent on ads more than pays for itself in extra revenue. And the system doesn't put HR, advertisers, and sales people above R&D - their jobs are all just as short lived these days in pharma. If you are going to blame anyone blame the investors - every free dollar goes to stock buybacks, not advertising. Anyway, I don't really see the congress and the senate directing the NIH on which drug candidates to pursue and which congressional districts to spend the money in working much more efficiently.

Comment: Re:i always thought this was a good idea (Score 1) 243

by pepty (#49133703) Attached to: The Peculiar Economics of Developing New Antibiotics

what really caught my attention was the plot of introduction and bacterial resistance over time. the newest antibiotics produced had a "shelf-life" of an order of magnitude less than their predecessors.

Some of that is because most new antibiotics aren't really all that new. The one on that list with the shortest "shelf life", levofloxacin, is a fluoroquinolone. We had already been using fluoroquinolones for 25 years by the time lefofloxacin came around.

Neutrinos have bad breadth.

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