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Comment: This is not Monsanto (Score 1) 400

by pandymen (#44809587) Attached to: Interview With Professor Potrykus, Inventor of Golden Rice
No one is telling these people they can't save their seeds from these crops. GMO does not necessarily mean that it is "closed source" and owned by the company that made it. That is just how big agriculture businesses like Monsanto operate. There is nothing indicating that will occur in this case.

GMO just has a stigma in that some people believe that they have hidden health side effects. The Monsanto lawsuits against farmers is another thing entirely. There are plenty of GMO crops out there besides the "Roundup Ready" seeds you are referring to.

Comment: Agile nothing new in other industries (Score 1) 136

by pandymen (#40947983) Attached to: Scrum/Agile Now Used To Manage Non-Tech Projects
Agile/Scrum is nothing new in other industries. I work in the engineering consulting business. We often have teams of 100+ engineers from multiple disciplines working on one project. When my programmer buddies explained what scrum was, it was very similar to the methods we use to run projects.

Comment: Less Abundant == Expensive to Refine (Score 1) 169

by pandymen (#35058738) Attached to: Molybdenite As an Alternative To Silicon
You will probably never see this in practice in any large scale semiconductors because of two reasons: 1. There is already an established process and infrastructure to refine silicon. 2. Mo costs more due to rarity and does not have a well established industrial process to refine it. As it stands, it is incredibly expensive and requires large amounts of energy to refine: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicon#Purification Mo being rarer to begin with will have a higher material cost, and will also probably be that much more difficult to refine. I am not sure what processes there are to distill/refine Mo into the superpure state needed for semiconductors, but I cannot imagine that there are established processes that can handle the worldwide demand for semiconductors.

Comment: Make the investigation public (Score 1) 92

by pandymen (#34817774) Attached to: BP Gulf of Mexico Rig Lacked Alarm Systems
Here's a buzzword for you that is applicable in this situation: Crowdsourcing Put the internal paperwork the government has received on an easily accessible website (or wait for Wikileaks to do it). This spill received enough attention and affected enough lives that the general public would be interested to see what is going on and do there own investigations of the facts. There are plenty of professionals in manufacturing design and control systems design that would be more than willing to give some of their own time to read up on some of the facts. I would personally like to see the cause and effect tables and their alarm database for the rigs control system/SIS system. I would rather see for myself than take a journalist's word for it.

Comment: Re:This is not about Net Neutrality (Score 1) 548

by pandymen (#34391858) Attached to: Level 3 Shaken Down By Comcast Over Video Streaming
RTFA. They aren't targetting video traffic specifically. They are targetting L3 as a whole. It just happens that Netflix is the reason that L3 traffic is spiking due to the huge usage in the U.S. Essentially, Netflix pays L3 for content delivery. This results in a huge spike in content delivery from L3 through to Comcast. Comcast now charges L3 for the extra content delivery because they do not have an agreement with Netflix, but an agreement that needs to be updated with L3.

Comment: "Quality" Procedures = More Paper (Score 1) 511

by pandymen (#31559664) Attached to: What Is Holding Back the Paperless Office?
Quality procedures force those in my office to keep a record of their hand markups. We need to be able to document all of the checks that took place to get a document out the door...hand marked, initialed, and dated. Then, when we kick something up for approval to go out the door, I need to print out fresh copy. Project managers also like their own hard copies to look at. Basically, although I may not have a problem looking at documents on my computer, those responsible for the overall project do.

Comment: Re:The Taxicab Story in Washington, DC (Score 1) 232

by pandymen (#31469822) Attached to: GPS Log Analysis Uncovers Millions In NYC Taxi Overcharges
It's all on the passenger in my opinion. I believe taxis in New York are just like those in Chicago where there is a poster showing the rates and rules. Any passenger can easily tell if they are getting overcharged by checking the meter against the poster. The only people who might get exploited are the totally hammered people going from bar to bar. In which case, the extra 4 dollars is about half the cost of a drink...so it doesn't really matter much in the long run. When I am totally hammered in a taxi, I don't really care how much they charge me as long as I get there.

Real Programmers don't write in PL/I. PL/I is for programmers who can't decide whether to write in COBOL or FORTRAN.

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